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  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    WY
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    Default Mixing Public with Home Schooling

    For my gifted 2nd grader, we are now homeschooling one day a week (much to the school's dismay).

    However, I've just found that since he's in dual immersion - the schedule no longer fits with his gifted class so he's no longer receiving this service.

    This is grade 2??!! what will happen if he just doesn't get these services as the years go on???

    Any thoughts on continuing ONE day a week, homeschooling as his gifted service and any other experience at having to be the squeaky wheel parent to insure these services are provided??? (the school has commented that they felt the dual immersion piece was challenge enough for him??!! His "gift" is in math... not language???!!!)

    All thoughts welcome... I may turn into one of those accidental homeschoolers... OH DEAR! But... my kids LOVE school, so probably not...


  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    138

    Default

    Does he have an IEP?

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    WY
    Posts
    16

    Default

    no. not even sure what IEP stands for.

    ???

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    IL
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    17

    Default

    An IEP is an Individualized Education Plan. Gifted children and those with other special needs are often given an IEP. The parents, teachers, and any other professional necessary (i.e, a physical therapist for a child with physical challenges) have a meeting and create customized goals for the child in certain areas based on the child's skills and abilities. These are outside the stadardized goals for children in their grade. For your child that would most likely include math lessons/activities that go above and beyond what other children in his grade are doing. They might also include social goals, for instance, making sure he still feels like a part of the group in his homeroom class due to the change in enrollment and the gifted program. Whatever goals you feel are important. Insisting on an IEP might make the administration sit up and take notice that you are serious and are not going to let your son fall through the cracks.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    WY
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    16

    Default

    thank you so much. I do feel like the squeaky wheel. I've just learned they will not release his test scores until the end of the year. Have contacted superintendent about this. Luckily I already had his scores to enroll him for John Hopkin's CTY summer services.

    It's frustrating that it feels like we're not all on the same team. Next year is the formal "gifted" program, so I will be sure to ask about an IEP. I was under the impression this was not for gifted students.

    We shall see. Once again, thanks.

  6. #6
    Junior Member Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Hi-
    I have a somewhat similar question. Our school district just introduced a horrible math program (everyday math). I'm quite sure they're not going to dump it any time soon. Can I either pull my daughter from math class each day and teach her or just have her do something else during math time and homeschool her after school on Math? We are looking at other schools but not sure if either of them will work so we're trying to research our options. We do like the teachers, just hate the math program. Thanks!

  7. #7
    Junior Member
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    Jan 2011
    Location
    WY
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    Default

    What do you not like about everyday math? Our system uses it too, but I don't really pay attention to it. I have checked our state standards and the curriculum here - it seems to follow my daughters math lessons OK. I am just working our way through T4L during homework time or for "extra credit" points which can then be changed in. I also think it's really important to know what your child can tolerate and is ready for. It's either great for enrichment or review...

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    138

    Default

    Here are my opinions, take them for what they are worth. I am a former public school teacher. I taught regular and special education. I have degrees in education, special education (included gifted & talented), and child psychology.

    First, if you child is documented as gifted (ie by psychologist etc) then they should be eligible for services or accommodations. This could take the form of an IEP or a 504 plan. Both are legal contracts that the schools must adhere to. They are contracts that are completed by a team of professionals and the parents. If you don't have the gifted documentation then you'll need to ask for an evaluation to get it. It'd probably be easiest to seek the testing yourself.

    I would never pull my child out of school for one day or even one subject. I think the headaches it would cause and the damage my relationship with the district would undergo would negate the gains I was hoping to have.

    In all reality, the school system cannot educate a gifted child as well as the parent. The parent can provide experiences, a customized curriculum, and a 1-1 instructor. That isn't going to happen in school. And since gifted and talented programs are always on top of the list to be cut during tough budget times, you can't rely on them. Then you are left with an over whelmed regular classroom teacher who doesn't have enough time or resources to do that child justice.

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