Asd/adhd/speech delay homeschooling questions
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  1. #1
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    Default Asd/adhd/speech delay homeschooling questions

    Hi everyone,

    I have been homeschooling my 6-year-old for his kindergarten year, and just started using T4L. I have some questions for those homeschooling kids with asd or ADHD. How much information is your child able to retain? I can barely get my son to look at the screen or a hands on project for more than a few minutes. How many hours a day do you work on activities? Do you do the same activities over and over until it is mastered? What about when they just can't grasp simple things such as writing their ABC's what tips and tricks are you using to help your child learn? What about with language delay as well, I was doing some unschooling at first to try to focus on everyday skills, but I know academics needs to be in there as well. Also, how about socialization, I live in NC, but there are really no local groups around for homeschooling. What do you do to allow your child to interact more with their peers? Any tips or advice would be appreciated, thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Asd/adhd/speech delay homeschooling questions

    Hi Muna!

    My 8 year old daughter *likely* has ADHD (her father has it and she shows all the signs). However, I have chosen just to deal with it rather than medicating her or anything of that nature. I don't even mention it to the doctor because I feel medicating her isn't the answer. Keeping them still and focused can be hard. I allow for a lot of "breaks", however, at 8 years old, I do require her to concentrate (often with a LOT of reminders however).

    Now, I also have a 4 year old son who was born with some brain abnormalities and his speech is behind for his age (he's perfectly normal in every other way). However, he knows more than I'd guess most children of his age range (my gut tells me that he'll catch up with his language abilities as time passes - he keeps getting better and better). The key is to keep it fun, simple, and very interactive.

    Here's an example: I would print out coloring pages for each letter. I'd have him color the letter A and when we're done we put it on the wall. Make a BIG deal out of it! High-fives, etc. At 6 years old, I would also print out a "dot-to-dot" page for them to practice writing each letter. But let him have some control over it, such as using color pencils maybe. It will help make it personal to him, help keep him focused, etc. Allow him to doodle too if he wants.

    The next day, B. I'd put that on the wall after A and we'd review: "A, B" and so on throughout the alphabet. The same could be done with colors either with the alphabet letters or maybe with printed coloring pages of his favorite things. And something similar can be done for shapes too.

    Dealing with the language delay: My son was in Birth-to-3 and now Early Childhood. I've had the benefit of help/suggestions from people who specialize in this. The best thing I can suggest is to try to make everyday life an opportunity to practice. For example: At breakfast time give him a choice. "Would you like cereal or oatmeal?" This way he has some control (which feels great for him) and he has to say which he'd prefer. When he answers it's high-5 time! Good job! and repeat the word back to him (so he hears again from you the proper pronunciation).

    Another simple idea is to take pictures of things. Have him help you so he feels involved. It can be of his favorite toys, people, or anything else. Review the pictures with him (you could even print them out and make him a photo album) and say the word for each picture (ie: Mommy, Paw Patrol, Race Track, etc.)

    Socialization: Don't forget that socializing with you, family, and friends is socialization. Outside of that however you might want to consider 4-H or Boy Scouts as an option. Also, most libraries hold a LOT of little events for kids. I know my library does.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Asd/adhd/speech delay homeschooling questions

    Hi Katrah,

    Thank you so much for sharing how you are handling situations and giving me some advice. I am going to start soon with the ABC print outs and see how that goes, I think that is a great idea. Then continue to review. Was your daughter writing her name, words, etc before kindergarten year ended? I know my son absolutely hates writing and it's so hard to get him focused to try. I know now we do a few things from T4L,then hands on to try to compliment what the lessons were about. I do try to get him involved with breakfast, etc, but I am learning I need to just talk, talk, talk about every little thing I am doing and hope he picks it up. How is your son's speech is it much better as he is getting older? I really appreciate your giving me some advice and tips. I just want to make sure he is learning, I am doing everything possible to make sure he learns.

    Thanks a bunch

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Asd/adhd/speech delay homeschooling questions

    My daughter was sort of writing her name before kindergarten. But not well, not well at all. Interestingly, she also hates writing by hand. By the end of Kindergarten she was writing her name. She continued to have problems with writing some letters backwards until a few months into 1st grade. Completely normal and common. Keep in mind too: Kindergarten wasn't always what it is today. When I was in public school Kindergarten was still only 1/2 days and learning ABC's, 123's, colors, shapes, etc. (I'm 37 by the way - and I think I turned out alright... lol) Now in public school everything is a grade ahead and at least in my school district they have no classes for gifted or challenged kids (such things existed when I was in public school). But not all kids are the same, nor ready at the same time as others, and that's okay and what makes homeschooling such a wonderful option. You can tailor to what is right for your child, and not have to "teach to a standard", but rather teach what's right for your child.

    I would try something like getting him a letter/number trace book. Heck, print out a cool picture of something he loves and tape that over the cover (making it more fun and personal - let him pick out the picture). Pair that with something like some stickers of his favorite cartoon characters and when he completes a page, he gets to pick out a sticker to put on and maybe even spend some time playing a game on Nick Jr. (you'd be surprised many of those games have education in them, such as colors, color mixing, matching, etc.) Then move on to a blank handwriting pad, etc.

    Or pick out several activity books from Amazon or your local store. Show him only those that you've picked and have him pick out his favorite one. When it arrives in the mail, let him open it. It will hopefully create a lot of excitement knowing he picked it out, etc.

    One of my biggest challenges with teaching my daughter is that she gets incredibly frustrated very quickly and it turns into something like a temper tantrum. (To a degree that I don't think is typical.) When she does this I just tell her that it doesn't need to be perfect; that it's the effort that counts, and that we will be continuing to work on whatever we're working on once she calms down (essentially letting her know that no amount of whining or tantrums is going to make this lesson go away). Then I'll do something else such as housework until she's calm. I actually ignore her after letting her know we'll continue when she's calm. No positive or negative reaction from me for that type of behavior. Then when we start again I act like the tantrum never happened. I don't know if your son does that sort of thing, but if he hates writing as you describe, I'm guessing it's likely. At 8 years old, this type of behavior has become much, much less common.

    And YES! Focusing is an incredible challenge! Keep things in small chunks, ignore bad behavior (but do not let him go play with toys, watch TV, etc. until what you've assigned has been done). Keep things as quiet and distraction free as possible (easy to say, hard to implement, I know!), try to personalize things and let him pick out as much as possible, and TONS of praise when he completes what you've assigned.

    Yes! Talk, talk, talk! My daughter, who is my oldest - I didn't even have to think about her with her language skills. This girl, I swear she probably has better speaking skills and a more extensive vocabulary than many adults. But with my son, it was (and still is) hard. I am constantly repeating words back to him, saying words very purposefully, (ie: giving him a glass to drink: "Water". Covering him with a blanket, "Blanket".) And yes, my son's speech is much much better! I'll give some examples, when he started on Birth-to-3 he was maybe a little over 2 years old. He didn't even say Mommy - really about the only things he said where: "Car" & "Kitty". Now you can sometimes carry on a very simple conversation with him (he's 4 and 3 months. ie: "Do you like being tickled?" "Yeah! Tickle me Mommy!"). However, he still doesn't respond when I ask him a question and he doesn't know the words or how to make the sentence. For example, he goes to Early Childhood (where he works with a speak therapist, etc.) and when he comes home I'll ask, "How was school?" He just nods his head, I'm sure because he just doesn't know how to form a sentence yet to describe what he did. But he can now ask for things such as, "Mommy, I'm hungry.", etc. I also have to act as translator for him a LOT. His pronunciation isn't horrible, but certainly not on pair with his peers.

    On the subject of peers, did you know that boys naturally are often a little behind in speech/language? This is an interesting read:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2923747/

    And knowing that - truly can make a parent feel a little better. Remember, our kids are not cookie-cutters (as public school treats them). You know much better than some test, standard, government, etc. what is best for your child. Try not to get too caught up in where he "should be" and concentrate instead on just celebrating with him his milestones.
    Last edited by Katrah; 03-31-2017 at 09:02 AM.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Asd/adhd/speech delay homeschooling questions

    Hi,

    Thank you so much for sharing your tips and how you are handling things. My son does have the tantrums at times as well, but the biggest challenge with him I think is that he refuse to really look at what we are working on. If we are tracing or doing a hands on activity where he needs to look at the flash cards he is looking up or around and not looking at the task at hand. It drives me crazy. We spent 15 minutes today looking at the number 2 and he kept telling me "it was brown" no matter how many times we counted the pictures on the back(two mickey mouse pictures) or I explained that brown was a color and not a number. Kept repeating it was the number 2 after we counted, it is so much repetition over and over, but I am thankful I do get to homeschool him and you're right I need to be very proud of the accomplishments he makes and not compare. Sometimes, I think as a parent, you want your kids to be the best of best and forget that they are perfect just the way God made them. I am going to try your tricks with tracing though. I am so happy that your son's language is improving, YOU ARE A WONDERFUL MOTHER AND DOING GREAT. Thank you for all the help and it's great to be able to get someone else perspective.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Asd/adhd/speech delay homeschooling questions

    Ugh! I just wrote something rather long and lost everything due to the "I'm not a robot" pop-up! Gotta love technology sometimes! Anyway...

    It sounds like your son has a case of, "Mom doesn't know anything!" I know that one VERY well! It also sounds like those flash cards aren't holding his attention. I wonder about trying to approach things differently where you embed the learning into everyday life with things he enjoys or are disguised as things he finds (or would find) fun.

    I would consider doing something like an "Of the Week" where the stars of the week are: the color brown, the number 2 and the letter A (just in example).

    Here's some ideas:

    Does you son watch Cars? My two boys are obsessed with anything with wheels. You could print out two coloring pages of Mater (he's a brown vehicle from the show). Write "Mater" on the top of each. Put all brown shaded crayons in one cup and the other colors in another. Put a sticky note that says, "Brown" on the cup with brown colors. Tell him he must use more brown than any other color. Have him circle the letter A in Maters name. Have him write the number 1 on the top of one, and 2 on the other. Put them up on the wall and review.

    Play with brown play-dough together. Each of you make the letter A with your play-dough at some point. How many letters A are there? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jv73CEzY1jg

    Snack time: something brown. Cheerios in example. What color are the Cheerios? Put the Cheerios in a cup and give him an empty plate. Have him place the Cheerios in sets of 2 on the plate before he eats them. Have him draw the letter A on the plate with them. Give him a glass of water with a sticky note that says, "Water". Have him find the letter A on the sticky note. How many cups does he have?

    Listen to a story featuring a brown bear: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcslNWM_cfg&t=1s

    Lunch time: peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Cut the sandwich in 1/2 and put a sticky note on the plate that says, "peanut butter and jelly". Have him find the A's. How many A's are there? How many pieces are there to his sandwich? How many ingredients where used inside the sandwich? What color is the peanut butter?

    Listen to a song about the letter A: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6Jz0Jp4XBY

    Practice trace writing the letter A and number 2 with a brown colored pencil.

    Make some chocolate chip cookies. Don't put the chips inside the dough. What color are the chips? What color is the dough? Have him place two chips on top of each ball of cookie dough before you put them in the oven. Do one "oven batch" where you shape out the letter A with your dough on the cookie sheet. Have him place chips on the letter A in sets of 2. Have lots of laughs and giggles when you see what your letter A looks like when it comes out of the oven.

    Dinnertime: Serve up something brown. Off the top of my head: baked potato, baked beans, or a salad with croutons and shelled sunflower seeds.

    Serve your cookies for dessert in sets of 2 and if you have more members of the family, talk about your day!

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Asd/adhd/speech delay homeschooling questions

    Hi Katrah,


    YOU ARE A GENIUS!!! Recently, I started trying to get him to color more by picking coloring books with characters he like, but I would have never thought of the things that you are suggesting. Thank you so much, I am going to really try the sticky notes, picking number and colors to try to get him to identify it throughout the day, etc. I am going to get everything in place by Monday and pray he absorbs it better. I think that is such a wonderful idea and I really do see it working for him. I am going to let you know how it goes at the end of the week. I am very excited try and get him more excited to learn and pay attention. THANK YOU SO MUCH

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