Moving to Alabama
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  1. #1
    sjcrambl is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Moving to Alabama

    My family homeschools our 7 year old in Mississippi, where there are virtually no formal requirements and we are not required to pay to be a part of a church school or a private school. We are moving to Alabama soon and we'd like to keep home schooling our son. Can anyone offer any guidance on the least intrusive and least expensive way to do this?

    Thanks Sincerely

  2. #2
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Default Re: Moving to Alabama

    Hi. Welcome to the forum!

    I'm not in Alabama, but I have an interest in homeschool laws, since each state is very different. I find it fascinating that the makers of fifty different sets of laws can all be "right" . . . but seem to think the other 49 are "wrong".

    Alabama has three homeschool options. The third (use a tutor) isn't really homeschooling, as the tutor must be certified and must follow public school guidelines, including school hours.

    The other two options are designed for private schools, but you are allowed to homeschool under either of the options by declaring yourself a private school. The church school option is the least restrictive. All you have to do file a church school enrollment form with the superintendent of your local public school (one time . . . not annually). You have to keep an attendance record, but it does not need to be submitted to anyone. (The only time you would be asked for it is if you were to be reported for education neglect, which is about as likely as being reported for any other kind of child neglect.) Lastly, you have to abide by any policies of the church school . . . and, since YOU are the church school, you set your own policies. (Examples of policies include school hours, subjects taught, etc.) That is all you have to do.

    If you are uncomfortable calling yourself a church school, the private non-church-school option has a few additional requirements in addition to those for a church school. If you feel you meet some definition of a church school, that is definitely the least restrictive in Alabama.

    You have to register your private non-church school every year by October 10.

    Five days after the start of public school, you have to report names and addresses of everyone enrolled.

    Each week, you have to report new students or those who leave, as well as any absences.

    You have to keep an attendance record (report only absences).

    Oddly, the only subject Alabama specifically requires private schools to teach is P.E. (I guess they just assume you'll be teaching math, reading, etc.)

    And you have to comply with any other policies established by the private school. Again, since you are the school, you establish your own policies.

    I hope this helps until an actual Alabama resident comes along to share some practical experience in your state!


    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  3. #3
    lisa1968m is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Smile Re: Moving to Alabama

    Hi! Just wanted to say thanks for great info! We are also moving to Alabama and are lining everything up!
    Lisa Toney


    Quote Originally Posted by hearthstone_academy View Post


    Hi. Welcome to the forum!

    I'm not in Alabama, but I have an interest in homeschool laws, since each state is very different. I find it fascinating that the makers of fifty different sets of laws can all be "right" . . . but seem to think the other 49 are "wrong".

    Alabama has three homeschool options. The third (use a tutor) isn't really homeschooling, as the tutor must be certified and must follow public school guidelines, including school hours.

    The other two options are designed for private schools, but you are allowed to homeschool under either of the options by declaring yourself a private school. The church school option is the least restrictive. All you have to do file a church school enrollment form with the superintendent of your local public school (one time . . . not annually). You have to keep an attendance record, but it does not need to be submitted to anyone. (The only time you would be asked for it is if you were to be reported for education neglect, which is about as likely as being reported for any other kind of child neglect.) Lastly, you have to abide by any policies of the church school . . . and, since YOU are the church school, you set your own policies. (Examples of policies include school hours, subjects taught, etc.) That is all you have to do.

    If you are uncomfortable calling yourself a church school, the private non-church-school option has a few additional requirements in addition to those for a church school. If you feel you meet some definition of a church school, that is definitely the least restrictive in Alabama.

    You have to register your private non-church school every year by October 10.

    Five days after the start of public school, you have to report names and addresses of everyone enrolled.

    Each week, you have to report new students or those who leave, as well as any absences.

    You have to keep an attendance record (report only absences).

    Oddly, the only subject Alabama specifically requires private schools to teach is P.E. (I guess they just assume you'll be teaching math, reading, etc.)

    And you have to comply with any other policies established by the private school. Again, since you are the school, you establish your own policies.

    I hope this helps until an actual Alabama resident comes along to share some practical experience in your state!


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