Lesson Activities Discussing Gods, Goddesses, or Idols
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Thread: Lesson Activities Discussing Gods, Goddesses, or Idols

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    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Default Lesson Activities Discussing Gods, Goddesses, or Idols

    If you find a Lesson Activity that discusses gods, goddesses, or idols, please post the Lesson Activity Number and any additional descriptive comments here, to help other parents decide if they might want to skip or discuss that activity with their children.

    As with all of these "alert" threads, you do not necessarily have to object to the material yourself to post an alert. It's understood that everyone will have a different comfort level regarding various topics. The goal is to give parents the information they need to make decisions for their own families.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

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    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    I'm pasting an older post from forum member "Carla" below:

    Fellow Christian Homeschoolers,

    Today we, my dd and I, came across our first activity that we felt objectionable. Could we get a forum going on lessons/activities that we think needed to be "red flagged"? It would be a help to other parents who are careful in what worldly values enter their home. If parents are aware ahead of time they can preview the lesson to see if it is one they care to have their child do or skip.
    My lesson of concern is:
    5th grade social studies
    chapter: Olmec
    Lesson code 3 (on lesson plans)
    LA number 5841
    On child's screen it is:
    Olmec-Art & Religion
    In this lesson they are to "Draw your own jaguar god"

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

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    Jamie Gaddy is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Re: Lesson Activities Discussing Gods, Goddesses, or Idols

    I noticed that in 3rd grade language arts under Elements of Fairy Tales - there are two lessons -
    Once upon a Time
    Spirits, Wizards, And Witches

    These openly discuss spirits as beings that take on the form of humans -
    Jamie
    Homeschooling mom to 6 dear blessings!
    http://onlineeducationforkids.com

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    Sherry is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Thanks for this. I am new to Time4Learning and it is good to know christians are looking out for each other.
    God bless!
    Sherry

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    Daph is offline Member
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    Thank you very much on the "heads up" on the Fairy Tales section. BTW, I just learned that "heads up" is an idiom. So is, "it's raining cats and dogs" - which is actually is, at our house.

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    Jaelyn Rae's Avatar
    Jaelyn Rae is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    When learning about and/or exposing our kiddos to such things we have found it is pointless to restrict such ideas because they are an integral part of our society. We simply present them as either make believe (witches, wizards, etc) or cultural beliefs (gods, idols). They know the difference between little g "god(s) and God the creator so we don't have a problem with them learning about things like greek gods and mythology. Personally I love Fantasy and SciFi and think that restricting exposure for Christian children would be a shame. Imagination and make believe needs to be cultivated in every child, not discouraged.

    When it comes to topics like cultural gods or idols (i.e. egyptian) that is a fantastic opportunity to cross reference a bible study as worship of false idols/gods is biblical. We can then explain that not everyone has been told about God and that should they meet someone who believes in false gods, it would be really great to tell them about God. It is also important to stress that they should never try to force their beliefs on another, or be rude or critical, that they should simply explain what they believe and why in a loving, non-combative manner. We also encourage our kiddos to learn about others beliefs, not so that they will lose their own faith, but rather to gain a greater understanding of how people think and why, be in from cultural or environmental studies or personal exploration. We also encourage free-thinking and learning. If they are interested in other religions and philosophies we encourage that because we want them to choose to follow Christ based on a personal, informed decision, not because it was ingrained since birth. Those that are taught "this is how it is, period" are the ones who (generally speaking) lose faith once out on their own. We are confident that their hearts firmly belong to God and that by being proactive in exposing them to other world views, the likelihood of them possibly being seduced by evil ideas in the future is much lower. The draw or appeal for those involved with satanic or other similar practices stems from the allure of the unknown. If you face it upfront and remove the mystery, you expose evil for what it is, thus eliminating its power of attraction.

    Honestly I find it silly and more than a little disheartening when I see Christian parents, pastors, churches, etc criticize or restrict their youth from things like the Harry Potter series. By objecting, they are in effect giving the idea of wizards more credibility that it would have had otherwise, when they could simply enjoy it for what it is, pure innocent make believe. Banishing Harry Potter is the same as banishing the Little Mermaid, talking animals, princesses, knights, and dragons. They are all in the same category and should be treated as such - fantasy. There is a reason that they characters have survived since the beginning of time, because the human mind needs a creative outlet, a place to imagine and dream that is very different from the mundane, everyday world. It is only when a child is clearly having trouble differentiating reality from fantasy that parents should intervene, and even then not at all for younger children, let them live in a land of make believe for as long as possible. They will eventually grow up to be a normal, well adjusted adult, why hurry that along? Kids are forced to grow up way too fast these days, which is the main reason we opted to homeschool. Our days are spent exploring nature, playing make believe complete with sword fights and slaying the dragons, playing wizards (making spells from nature and nonsense words, not from evil/satanic rituals or chanting) to save the world, or simply getting covered in mud, fingerpaints, or both! As a result our kiddos are very happy, well adjusted, non-materialistic kids who have an amazing love and compassion for people and the world as a whole and whom have a love of God based on an attitude of humble gratefulness, that any Christian adult would be proud to emulate. Often while teaching them, I find myself learning from them just as much, as they have the benefit of innocence.

    Funny how they have been able to survive the "horrors" of being exposed to witches, wizards, and gods (oh my!) and not have it affect their faith, actions, or compassion in any way.

    NOTE: I just wanted to clarify that my intent is NOT to be critical of anyone wanting to remove such topics from their lesson plans. I simply wanted to point out that while it is good to be aware of such things, they (in my opinion) are just not that big of a deal so long as parents are doing their job and teaching "teaching their children in the ways of the Lord...". It becomes a problem for children who are exposed to fantasy without clarifying that it is not real, and without a strong foundation of what is right, and good, and true, which I believe is defined as teaching the Word of God.

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    hlockhart is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Amen

    I think Jaelyn hit the nail right on the head! I do not even want to add anything because she said it so perfect!

    Thank you for stepping out on a limb and saying what you did. I did not think it was critical at all - just your point of view. We need other people's point of view - our opinions are allowed to change. If nobody shared their views / ideas, we would not see how sometimes others are right.

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    Camp Family is offline Junior Member
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    We did the lesson for Olmecs BUT I told my son to disregard drawing the jaguar god and we had a discussion about idols and idol worship instead.
    lovehmschlg and savedbygrace like this.

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    papapendleton is offline Junior Member
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    We just started Time4Learning today (8-17-15), so I'm not sure how this comment will show up. This is Kim Pendleton and I have enjoyed reading your comments Jaelyn, because they were very eye-opening and helped me with a lot of my fears on some of the lessons, like magic, false Gods and etc. Thanks for you insight!

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    I agree jaelyn

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