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Thread: Profanity in 3rd grade LA show

  1. #11
    MomsHomeSchool101 is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    I let my kids use the OMG, but stress that the g means goodness or gosh...I have also noticed that the more I make a "big deal" of things the more my kids WANT to use the words.It seems now a days U cant do anything without using OMG..I am just grateful that I can keep my kids away from all the other negative things that come along with public school such as teen sex ...drugs...and violence.I can deal with the OMG, I'm sure our Lord will understand.

  2. #12
    MomsHomeSchool101 is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chandra Rose View Post
    That is too bad they definitely could have reworded it... bodily function humor I think should be fine if it is tasteful. It is natural and God's design. God has a sense of humor look at parts of creation...
    I agree....

  3. #13
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    PinkyMorche is offline Junior Member
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    We will be moving to third grade soon and very glad for the heads up and will be looking out for this. Thanks.

  4. #14
    Sanitized&PC is offline Junior Member
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    Encountering the OMG, would not cause us to stop our service, it would simply spark an object lesson about how we have to share our language and our world with others and they may not always respect our sensibilities. From there I'd encourage my children to correct it in their minds. My younger son is decidedly more sensitive about offensive religious epithets, he'd probably respond well to an opportunity to write a letter to the company discouraging them from producing more questionable material.

    We each have our own ways of dealing with profanities and perceived profanity. My kids have been banned from using what I call fluff words and all their cousins. Meaning if you would use a word to replace a known bad word then it's equally as bad because the intent behind the word is the same. i.e. "What the fudge was that?" In our house that's no different than saying the real word. Similarly, words that demean another are instantly bad. Even my husband and I won't use them. My kids think "Stupid" is the S word. We've discussed the four letter words, their meanings and their origins. From there we encourage them to articulate. Once they've demonstrated an ability to articulate feelings and frustrations without being offensive, we'll revisit what they are or are not allowed to say. In the mean time, we can try but we'll never be able to truly shelter them from ever hearing an offensive turn of speech, so, we just educate them.

  5. #15
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    Jaelyn Rae is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    We are on the same page as :Sanitized&PC: in that rather than avoiding the issue, we simply explain it and move on. We regularly use the acronym OMG however our kiddos understand it to mean "Oh My Goodness" (queue that little squeaky voice from Annie saying "Oh my goodness, oh my goodness!", thats all I hear in my head when I hear/read OMG). It's all about personal perspective.

    As for "standard" profanity, we intentionally taught our kiddos the words at a young age, while also teaching them that repeating them is not acceptable. That just because they may hear others saying them, it does not ever make it right or okay. We figured the earlier the better because it is simply unavoidable these days. You can only shelter your children so much. Even though we personally do not use profanity, something as innocent as eating out at a restaurant or going grocery shopping could potentially expose them. Rather than waiting for them to ask (usually at a very awkward moment) "what does f**k mean, we explained that some people choose to use certain words that are very bad words and those words are (...). Or worse by not teaching them, they might repeat the words not knowing what they mean.

    It was actually kind of hilarious when we had these "learning moments" (especially with our first) because I have never used profanity - despite (or perhaps because of) frequent exposure as a child. Its so bad that saying the words as a teaching tool (or even to repeat something said by another) is literally physically difficult, I become tongue-tied, uncomfortable and have to force the words out of my mouth. It has always been that way. So when we sat our kids down, my hubby had to be the one to say the actual words. Very silly I know, but something inside me just wont let me say them and I am not one to be "overly moral".

    In addition to the "bad words" we taught them that several other words are "not nice words" and also not acceptable. These would include stupid, hate, or using a body part to describe anything other that what it actually is (i.e. butthead), and any words used in a hurtful manner (i.e. she's such a baby). We also explained that words for bodily functions, while they may seem funny at times, generally do not need to be said unless used for their actual purpose (i.e. Did you fart? Yes. Well what do you say?).

    They will still occasionally repeat an objectionable word that we failed to include, and at that moment we simply explain that it is a bad/not nice word and then take a few minutes to come up with at least 5 other acceptable words that could be used in its place. It is a great opportunity to build vocabulary and teach a valuable lesson at the same time.

    As for the inclusion of "oh my G-d" in a lesson, this is a bit disturbing. Our kiddos are very independent (which is why I love the TFL platform) and I do not review/monitor every lesson. I will generally look through one lesson in each unit to see what they are learning about to create activities to compliment it or I will review the lesson if they need additional help on something. So the idea that they could be learning such things without my knowledge is unsettling, however I simply have to leave it to my kiddos to make the right decisions based on what they have been taught thus far and to make corrections as the need arises.

    Bottom line, while I would prefer that TFL not include things like this, it isn't a dealbreaker. It becomes a matter of "does the benefit outweigh the risk?".

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