5th Grade Social Studies
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  1. #1
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    Default 5th Grade Social Studies

    My son's 5th Grade Social Studies really has 447 lessons?!

    And my daughter's 7th grade has 173?

    Why are there so many lessons for 5th grade Social Studies? That seems quite excessive to me. Not sure how to plan for that, especially starting this curriculum mid-year.

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks much!!

  2. #2
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Hi. Remember that every school or curriculum will differ in their opinion of what a "fourth grader" or a "seventh grader" should be studying for social studies. In middle school, students are often required to have a certain number of social studies credits, but are given a choice about what social studies class to take. For example, they might be offered a choice between world geography, American history, or a specific period in world history. Social studies is such a huge and broad subject that to expect any student to study everything related to "social studies" before graduation would be impossible.

    I've been in your shoes. I would count the number of days left in your school year and choose several chapters from the social studies curriculum to study with that remaining time. You'll need to do a little counting to find a combination of chapters that have the approximate number of activities to correspond with the remaining number of days in your school year. Get your student's input, because we always learn better if we are interested in the subject matter. I found that chapters 14 and 15 in fifth grade social studies were perfect for a course on politics and economics to finish out a school year, but feel free to choose whatever works for your student.

    The seventh grade social studies is a great overview of American history . . . pretty much all of it! It is pretty common for American history courses to focus on a certain era, so I would feel free to choose a section from that course, as well.

    Don't worry they will "miss" something. We all do! Kids switching schools (due to moving, etc.) and kids changing curriculum will always need to re-study some things they already know or not study some things the other kids in the class have already studied. On the other hand, the other kids in the class likely weren't exposed to the material in your child's previous curriculum.

    There is great leeway with science and social studies, as well as higher level language arts.

    Good luck developing a great schedule for the rest of your school year.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  3. #3
    SnickerJunky's Avatar
    SnickerJunky is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by hearthstone_academy View Post

    Don't worry they will "miss" something. We all do! Kids switching schools (due to moving, etc.) and kids changing curriculum will always need to re-study some things they already know or not study some things the other kids in the class have already studied. On the other hand, the other kids in the class likely weren't exposed to the material in your child's previous curriculum.

    There is great leeway with science and social studies, as well as higher level language arts.

    Good luck developing a great schedule for the rest of your school year.
    ******

    I've been looking up the info for the standarized testing and they say that they will include Social Studies. How do we know if what our kids (mine is in 5th grade) have studied to this point will be on their test when there are so many assignments? I will feel awful if I have had him learning all of this (what appears to be more like history than social studies) and nothing he has worked hard to learn is on the test and he fails that part because of what IS on it.

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    As homeschool moms, we tend to feel WE are being tested when our student takes standardized tests.

    You can't really fail a standardized test. These tests simply indicate how your child's results compare with other students of the same age, nationwide. For example, if your child scores in the 50th percentile in social studies, this means that, out of every 100 students tested, fifty answered more questions correctly than he did and 49 answered fewer questions correctly. I wouldn't complain about a score like that at all.

    Remember that every student in the nation taking these tests is in the same boat. They have all studied different topics in social studies. The tests are designed to ask questions across a broad range of topics, so there is no reason for your child to be at a disadvantage. If he has studied just American history in depth for several years, he will do quite well on the American history questions and probably won't answer many of the other questions correctly at all. On the other hand, if he has studied a little American history, a little geography, and a little world history, he won't do so well on the American history portion, but will get a few of the geography and world history questions right.

    Standardized tests ask questions well above the student's expected grade level, too, so your son shouldn't feel bad if he doesn't know many of the answers.

    For a well-rounded education, avoid "teaching to the test". You could theoretically obtain a copy and only teach those things to your child, but that isn't the point of education. The kids are expected to get quite a few questions wrong on standardized tests. Unlike chapter tests or lesson quizzes, a standardized test isn't a measure of whether or not the child has mastered specific material.

    I hope this helps. My kids have all used Time4Learning and they have scored very, very well on the CAT-5 over the years.

    P.S. My own state only requires an average score in the 13th percentile to avoid state oversight. Some states require standardized tests, but don't have any specific ideas about where the student should score. They just want the score on record.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

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