Writing Problems 10 year old
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Thread: Writing Problems 10 year old

  1. #1
    ourbeautifulpath is offline Junior Member
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    Default Writing Problems 10 year old

    Hi Everyone,

    We are new to T4L and our son is enjoying it for the most part.

    The issue I am having is getting him to write. He just hates it and thinks I am being totally unreasonable wanting him to copy a couple of sentences of around 30 words a day!!! Major meltdown's today for a long time!!. He is happy to type,)but not what I would call in a proper writing) but writing he detests and makes his views known loudly!!!

    Do I force him to write, currently I am getting him to copy phrases or such things, as he will avoid writing at all costs - considering the lack of it, he doesnt do a bad job with his cursive - but he probably does a sentence or two a day if Im lucky.

    Has anyone else had this problem with their child, and how did you get around it.

    Just as an add on, he was unwell alot of last year, and so as far as writing goes he was writing The quick brown fox.... and he didnt mind that too much, but now he feels anything other than that is dreadful. I expect being sick for so many months last year hasnt helped the situation any at all, but where to go from here!!

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    Cam
    * Just an update, he seems to find it hard/ very slow to write, has never liked it or drawing etc either. While his vocal/vocab/comprehension is great, his punctuation, using capitals at the beginning of sentences, full stops etc is not great and even when copying writing he misses words, sometimes letters, the concept of Capitals and small letters seem to elude him as some are small letters the size of capitals, i's the size of l's etc. I was just talking to my husband and he said he had the same issues at school - maybe its some sort of processing issue? can anyone relate or have similar problems?
    Last edited by ourbeautifulpath; 03-15-2015 at 01:52 AM. Reason: Further information

  2. #2
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    It sounds like you are concerned about two separate things: penmanship and composition.

    I wonder if it's a "boy" thing? Both of my older sons hated to put pen or pencil to paper. I didn't have trouble getting them to use a word processor, though.

    I just let them use a word processor for writing and composition.

    If they struggle with the physical act of writing (putting pen or pencil to paper), and you insist they do their writing by hand, then you can't really evaluate how well they write (compose), because they will be reluctant to put what's in their head down on the paper. You might look at Time4Writing. The courses are only eight weeks long, and my kids have absolutely loved having someone other than me evaluate their writing. He would do the exercises on the built-in word processor, so he would be free of the physical manipulation of pencil or pen. The completion certificates give a great sense of accomplishment. You get a whole lot for $99.

    If it's penmanship you are worried about, I can only share my belief that a teeny bit of practice, done every day, is more valuable than long practice sessions that the child only wants to get out of. I would require one sentence of his choosing to be written every day in his very best penmanship. (Specify minimum number of words.) Keep these in a spiral notebook or something, so you can see the improvement throughout the year. After he writes one sentence, you can have him re-write it with your corrections (letter height, etc.). He'll soon realize that taking time to do his best the first time will avoid having to do it again.
    tadamom likes this.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  3. #3
    hgrfam is offline Junior Member
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    Default same struggle here

    I struggle with the same thing. My 10 year old son hates writing and unless he takes his time while writing it's so sloppy. This is only our second week homeschooling so I'm not an expert but we are going with 15 min of penmanship work every day. I found this site for free handwriting sheets: Amazing Handwriting Worksheet Maker . I can make fun sentences for him to practice writing. Then I'm also grading him on his penmanship on all other assignments and won't accept them if I can't read them. It makes him stop & think (with constant reminding) to write neatly or he'll have to start over. He is also logging in a journal. He can write anything he wants but still has to write it neatly. He loves doing comic's so I'm planning to incorporate those into art and require the penmanship as well. Just little things that make him practice writing everyday but not for very long at one time. I also just ordered some writing workbooks from amazon for like $5 and they include activities for 40 weeks of school. Haven't got them in yet to know how helpful they will be but anything to add little bits of extra writing in his day has to help. Good luck!
    cobwebmsnd likes this.

  4. #4
    RhondaL is offline Junior Member
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    I think, maybe, the first thing you may want to find out is 'why' your child hates writing so much. My 10 year old son hates it as well. It's not that he can't write, but that he finds it difficult to write. He has never drawn or colored either (though he enjoys painting as long as it's free hand with not guide lines). Our underlying issue turned out to be difficulties in conveying things from his mind to the paper and now that he has recently been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder it all makes total sense. I let him type when we absolutely can't avoid sentences for school work, but otherwise we work with his therapist to help.

  5. #5
    Ruth_Lanton's Avatar
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    What exactly are your goals for your child's writing? I, personally, separated out penmanship from other aspects of writing: grammar, spelling, capitalization, and "learning to organize thoughts on paper". Everything can be done on a computer except for the penmanship part.

    My penmanship goals for my kids are threefold:

    1) Be able to leave a legible note by hand, such as adding items to a shopping list or "I'm at Tommy's house, the number there is XXX-XXXX"

    2) Be able to read others' handwriting, in both cursive and print.

    3) Know enough cursive to sign names to documents and to write checks.

    If your child has already mastered enough handwriting to meet those goals, do you really need to continue with the penmanship practice?

    I did a lot more handwriting with my daughters because they didn't mind, and we didn't have a lot of computers in the house when they were little. But my son has fine motor skill delays and finds handwriting difficult and physically painful. So I only have him write the bare minimum needed- basic skills to survive in the world. The rest is all done on the computer. That's all the public school would have done for him if I hadn't pulled him out- instead of working on his handwriting, they were going to give him OT to work on "keyboarding skills" (which are already fine) and let him do more typing and less writing in all his classes.
    Ruth, single mom to Jack, 13, Hannah, 19, and Leah, 20.

  6. #6
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    I love what Ruth said. It's a sensible compromise. Some people just don't have the motor skills for beautiful handwriting, but they can still have functional penmanship skills. I'm thinking about how I would feel if someone insisted I learn to draw realistically. I've tried many times, and I'm just not capable of that. I can make my point with stick figures or a simple map, though, so my drawing skills are at least functional (usually ).

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  7. #7
    pgam is offline Junior Member
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    Not just a boy thing. My 10 year old daughter hates writing also but can float on the keyboard. What I do is add spellingcity.com to her daily lessons after time4learning because I don't think time4learning puts enough focus on spelling. So with spellingcity.com I use time4learning's spelling words list and create a weekly lesson using 10 of the words. I then add to the lesson instructions that she sees on her assignment page that she writes those words 3 times each in cursive Monday-Thursday in a notebook along with her signature also 3 times each. She gives me the notebook on Thursday when she's finished because she takes a test on Friday's on spellingcity.com and is graded. So it may not be a lot of writing but I'm happy to get that much out of her because she hates it so. Hope this helps.
    journey00 and cobwebmsnd like this.

  8. #8
    SandraG is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    I believe that it's just that our kids love the easy way to do things, so is the typing thing. When I grew up, everything didn't include typing, we had to read and write things mostly. Now, they are used to everything in which typing is the most important factor, and easier than writing. So, obviously kids will have a slight interest towards it. The only way, I think, to help kids write is that give them small paras to be written every single day, and if possible give him books to read, other than the books they need to study. If the kid gets interested in reading, then slowly he will write things too.

  9. #9
    lraegnd05443 is offline Junior Member
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    My daughter has always hated writing as well. I think alot of it has to do with her grip on the pencil. She has such a death grip on it that I'm amazed that it doesn't break. She was in public school from K through grade 3, and that's the way she learned, and I have not been able to undo that. Keyboarding is another thing. She does amazingly well with typing, but still needs practice with a pencil. She is 13. I have her do journal writing every day. She can choose the subject as long as she writes neatly and coherently; with proper sentence mechanics. She still grumbles about it, but she is getting better.

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