Homeschooling - 180 Days
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Thread: Homeschooling - 180 Days

  1. #1
    Niquexox is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Question Homeschooling - 180 Days

    Hello all!

    I'm REALLY considering homeschooling my daughters starting the upcoming school year of 2018/2019. Trying to make sure I understand correctly. We are required to only HS the children for 180 days? As in approximately 6 months?

    Thank you!

  2. #2
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Default Re: Homeschooling - 180 Days

    Hi! Georgia expects you to homeschool 180 days because that's the equivalent of a traditional "school year" . . . five days a week for nine months (or 36 weeks). They aren't counting days off (traditionally weekends). Although they have obviously based their expectations on a traditional school model, the actual schedule is up to you, as long as you provide 180 days of instruction.

    The state expects each day to consist of at least 4 1/2 hours of instruction. However, in the few states that require a certain number of hours of homeschoolers, parents legitimately count educational DVDs, arts and crafts, creative play in the younger years (have you noticed the blocks and clay in a kindergarten classroom?), music lessons, Little League or other sports, Scouting, 4H, church activities, volunteer work, part time jobs ("life skills"), field trips (family outings with some educational value), and casual parental instruction in things like cooking or auto mechanics.

    You don't need to submit any attendance records to the state, but it's a good idea to keep a calendar log in your records, just in case you were ever reported for suspicion of educational neglect (about as likely as being reported for any other kind of child neglect). Time4Learning keeps a record of your child's online work, so just add offline things to your calendar like, "trip to zoo, nature science, 4 hours" or "made dinner for family, home ec, 2 hours" or "practiced piano, music, 30 minutes".

    You also need to notify the state that you are homeschooling each year. You need to teach at least reading, language arts, mathematics, social studies, and science, but the state does not dictate the content of those subjects. For example, social studies can be American history, geography, community helpers, world history, the history of a certain time period, etc. You decide.

    Homeschooled students in Georgia must receive an annual standardized test. You do not submit the results to anyone. You keep this in your records for the same reason I suggested keeping a calendar log, above.

    Finally, you must write an annual progress report and keep it in your records for at least three years. Again, you do not need to submit this to anyone.

    I hope this helps you understand Georgia's homeschool laws.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  3. #3
    Niquexox is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Re: Homeschooling - 180 Days

    Quote Originally Posted by hearthstone_academy View Post
    Hi! Georgia expects you to homeschool 180 days because that's the equivalent of a traditional "school year" . . . five days a week for nine months (or 36 weeks). They aren't counting days off (traditionally weekends). Although they have obviously based their expectations on a traditional school model, the actual schedule is up to you, as long as you provide 180 days of instruction.

    The state expects each day to consist of at least 4 1/2 hours of instruction. However, in the few states that require a certain number of hours of homeschoolers, parents legitimately count educational DVDs, arts and crafts, creative play in the younger years (have you noticed the blocks and clay in a kindergarten classroom?), music lessons, Little League or other sports, Scouting, 4H, church activities, volunteer work, part time jobs ("life skills"), field trips (family outings with some educational value), and casual parental instruction in things like cooking or auto mechanics.

    You don't need to submit any attendance records to the state, but it's a good idea to keep a calendar log in your records, just in case you were ever reported for suspicion of educational neglect (about as likely as being reported for any other kind of child neglect). Time4Learning keeps a record of your child's online work, so just add offline things to your calendar like, "trip to zoo, nature science, 4 hours" or "made dinner for family, home ec, 2 hours" or "practiced piano, music, 30 minutes".

    You also need to notify the state that you are homeschooling each year. You need to teach at least reading, language arts, mathematics, social studies, and science, but the state does not dictate the content of those subjects. For example, social studies can be American history, geography, community helpers, world history, the history of a certain time period, etc. You decide.

    Homeschooled students in Georgia must receive an annual standardized test. You do not submit the results to anyone. You keep this in your records for the same reason I suggested keeping a calendar log, above.

    Finally, you must write an annual progress report and keep it in your records for at least three years. Again, you do not need to submit this to anyone.

    I hope this helps you understand Georgia's homeschool laws.
    Hi Kelly! I just wanted to double back and let you know that I really appreciated your helpful and informative response. Thanks so much!

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