New homeschooler with an Aspie...advice welcome!
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Thread: New homeschooler with an Aspie...advice welcome!

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    Poddygirl is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default New homeschooler with an Aspie...advice welcome!

    Hi all....
    I've decided to take the leap into homeschooling my 10 year old Aspie son. I feel confident that we are making the right choice, except the problem is we are not sure what the choice should actually be.
    Here's the thing. My son was diagnosed a year ago but we knew long before that something was wrong as far as school went. Since KG he would scream and cry every morning to go to school and every night before bed begging not to go the next day. Guaranteed I would get a call at least once a week from a teacher about his behavior....mostly his refusal to do the classwork. Once the diagnosis came it all made sense, so we pulled him from the school that wasn't doing him any good (if you're not a cookie cutter kid there you don't survive) and put him into a very small school with special needs trained teachers. He has improved academically and socially in the past 2 years there but he still begs and pleads to not go to school ever again. I know he is no longer being bullied and he is not being abused in any way...in fact, the staff is very supportive and gives him a lot of leeway if he's having an "off" day. Still, given his absolute hatred of traditional school and all things called "learning", we feel he may be happier at home and will excel beyond our expectations at this point.
    Here's the thing: I'm a fairly "lazy" parent, meaning I don't want to be doing charts, logs, lesson plans, etc etc, all the things that homeschooling seems to entail. Obviously supervision and help is needed and that's fine with me but not an 8 hour day of said chores...I dislike school just as much as he does. So I looked into T4L and K12 and FLVS type schooling for him, thinking it would be perfect because everything is done up and there are teachers online to follow up. Another homeschooling mom reminded me that what we are doing now DOES NOT WORK for him (traditional schooling) and that bringing the same thing home will simply be more of the same resistance. I tend to agree! So now what do I do? I'm fairly certain once he unschools a bit and relaxes, he will be more willing to learn....right now it's like beating a dead horse....but should I bring brick and mortar home or go the full hippie mom type thing, making up lesson plans on my home made paper that I slaved over all night lol? I'm at a loss here. I don't know what combining the two systems entails, nor do I even understand where I will be starting with him because his days are so very structured at school and I want a much more relaxed approach at home. He likes and needs structure yes but it gets really old really fast for him. If you're still with me at this point I appreciate it! Long post but I hope somebody can guide me. Thank you

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    fairylover's Avatar
    fairylover is offline Senior Member
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    First let me say welcome to homeschooling. It's not as frightening as it seems at first. I would take some time of deschooling. Don't do anything that looks like school at all for a bit. Just do fun field trips and things like that. Go to museums, historic sites, environmental centers. Try to find things that he is interested in. Let him read a lot about those subjects. When you start to add school back in, do it slowly. Maybe just one course at a time, like language arts if he likes that. Whatever he has the most interest in. Break the lessons up into very small segments. I love time4learning for this because the lessons are pretty short. The animation keeps my boy interested. In between the short lessons include some physical activity or a snack. My son goes out to check the mail. Or he will go up and down the block a couple of times on his bike. The point is to get him moving. Let his body work as much or harder than his brain. I think you will find K12 to be too rigid for him. I'm not familiar with the other program you mentioned.

    It is also important to connect with a good local homeschool support group. This is important for you as well as for your son. There is a forum for special needs kids. You might want to check it out for more advice in that area. You don't have to do the whole school at home thing. But you also don't have to reinvent the wheel yourself. Relax and enjoy your son.
    Kathi Homeschooling Mama to Twelve year old Dakota

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    Poddygirl is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Quote Originally Posted by fairylover View Post
    First let me say welcome to homeschooling. It's not as frightening as it seems at first. I would take some time of deschooling. Don't do anything that looks like school at all for a bit. Just do fun field trips and things like that. Go to museums, historic sites, environmental centers. Try to find things that he is interested in. Let him read a lot about those subjects. When you start to add school back in, do it slowly. Maybe just one course at a time, like language arts if he likes that. Whatever he has the most interest in. Break the lessons up into very small segments. I love time4learning for this because the lessons are pretty short. The animation keeps my boy interested. In between the short lessons include some physical activity or a snack. My son goes out to check the mail. Or he will go up and down the block a couple of times on his bike. The point is to get him moving. Let his body work as much or harder than his brain. I think you will find K12 to be too rigid for him. I'm not familiar with the other program you mentioned.

    It is also important to connect with a good local homeschool support group. This is important for you as well as for your son. There is a forum for special needs kids. You might want to check it out for more advice in that area. You don't have to do the whole school at home thing. But you also don't have to reinvent the wheel yourself. Relax and enjoy your son.
    Thank you for responding, Fairylover! I understand that "deschooling" term...I know he will need it but of course the part of me that's had traditional education beaten into me worries about his forgetting everything he has learned in school thus far....is that a valid concern? He actually finds the T4L lessons "babyish"....his words lol....so I guess if he finds them tedious or boring I will have to find alternatives but I do know that the majority of the work will be online. You've echoed my concerns about the K12 being too rigid, which is why I haven't embraced that idea. I will definitely take your suggestions! I also signed him up for Minecraft Homeschool, a new site that teaches history and social studies in a Minecraft world. He loves that game.

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    fairylover is offline Senior Member
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    Perhaps you need to move your son up to the next grade if he finds it boring. It may be too easy for him. I don't think kids forget the important stuff. I mean they may forget the dates and names that were memorized to pass a test but is that all that important anyway. I think as long as they can read and write and do basic math, the other stuff can be looked up if they really want to know it. Teach him how to research on the internet.

    Minecraft is a wonderful tool. My son has improved in his reading and spelling since he has been using it. One local homeschool group that we are a part of meets at a library once a month so the kids can play Minecraft and learn from each other.
    MamaToHerRoo likes this.
    Kathi Homeschooling Mama to Twelve year old Dakota

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    MamaToHerRoo is offline Senior Member
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    Love the recommendation for Minecraft, my daughter wants to get that game now, so you just put a mark in her column! I would also say that along the lines of games there are lots of things that are "educational" and still fun. Learning Games for Kids has lots of fun games.
    Linda
    Homeschooling one for 8 years and counting!

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