HS with my ASD son - new to this
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    JustanotherLEOW is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default HS with my ASD son - new to this

    SO I am new to the HS and very nervous. He struggles so much and we have tried public school in different set ups and also private school for a year and nothing seems to work for him. So we have decided to move to homeschooling with him. We have played with time 4 learning a few days while we have been home "sick" and it seems to work really well with his visual learning. He is 9 years old but still on K and 1st grade level. He has done really well in areas he normally would struggle in so I am holding on to hope that this will work for him. My biggest thing is keeping him tuned in to the program and not other things around the house. Can anyone give me some advice on ASD and SPD kids and home schooling? when he is asking for breaks do I let him have them I don't want to wear him out and he not be absorbing the information but I also don't want him to think he can do what he wants when he wants to do it.

  2. #2
    fairylover's Avatar
    fairylover is offline Senior Member
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    First let me say welcome to the forums and to homeschooling.

    My son did not have a diagnosis or anything like that because I never had him tested. However he has an extremely short attention span. For him, I have him work a little while and then take a break and do something active or eat a small snack. He would run around the house or take his bike to the corner and back. Something short. Then he was able to focus for another short period of time. He needed the breaks in between the school work. You might want to set a timer so he knows exactly how long the break will be. I have found that too long of a break can make it hard to get back to work.

    You may find it helpful to check out the special needs forum. They will probably have a lot of advice for you. The most important thing is to relax and enjoy being with your child. Have fun.
    Kathi Homeschooling Mama to Twelve year old Dakota

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    KLD99 is offline Junior Member
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    My daughter has Asperger's and is in the first grade. She is a sensory-seeker, so we do several things throughout the day that increase her ability to focus on school. Between each subject, we take a break to jump on the trampoline, swing, or play in the ball pit. We also change her seating depending on her mood -- from a swivel chair on which she can sway back and forth, a yoga ball on which to bounce, as well as a vibrating seat cushion. On occasion, we also use the Z-Vibe Pencil (vibrating pencil) that provides sensory input she likes but does not affect the quality of her writing. If certain sounds are causing distraction, she uses her noise-cancelling headphones. If she's having to watch an informative video, we have bean-filled socks or other squeeze toys that she can manipulate to give her physical input. My child likes video games, so I have educational apps on her tablet that she can play from time to time (such as Stack the States, Math Magic, Monster Physics, etc.). I also try to alternate computer/tablet time with tangible activities (such as doing a science experiment in the kitchen, creating a model of a scene in a book, setting up a candy store to practice buying/selling using real money, etc.) If you see attitude changes that indicate your child is headed towards a meltdown, it is always good to take breaks or switch up the learning environment. If your child is being resistant to doing any schooling, find the subject that he enjoys (for my daughter, it's Pokemon) and incorporate that subject matter into some of your lessons for the day. And giving your child choices in the process - such as, "do you want to practice addition or subtraction today?" or "which of these 2 books do you want to read?" or "about which of these 2 pictures do you want to write a story?" - can eliminate power struggles. My philosophy is that it's important for my child to learn the material, not to see how long she can focus on a subject at one sitting or worry about keeping to a traditional schedule. The beauty of home schooling is knowing that I have the flexibility to do what works best for my child to reach her educational goals.
    fairylover likes this.

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    fairylover is offline Senior Member
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    What she said.
    Kathi Homeschooling Mama to Twelve year old Dakota

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