New to Louisiana as well as home schooling
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  1. #1
    Mrs.Grant Been Blessed's Avatar
    Mrs.Grant Been Blessed is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default New to Louisiana as well as home schooling

    Hello everyone I am new to Leesville, LA as well as home schooling. I will be home schooling my 9 year old son and we both are very excited. We are new members to Time4Learning as well and school starts for us on the 22nd of August.
    Y.GRANT

  2. #2
    MamaToHerRoo's Avatar
    MamaToHerRoo is offline Senior Member
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    Welcome to Time4Learning! We are glad to have you here. What made you decide to homschool?
    Everyone has a story and we would love to hear yours!
    I have an 11 year old daughter, we live near Baton Rouge, and have been homeschooling and using Time4Learning for 4 years. We school all year long, taking our biggest break of the year between Thanksgiving and New Years. Living in Louisiana, you know how hot and muggie it has been, we spend summers in the air conditioning, and more time outside in spring and fall.
    Anyway, jump right in with any questions or comments you have, and again, welcome!
    Linda
    Homeschooling one for 8 years and counting!

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    Mrs.Grant Been Blessed's Avatar
    Mrs.Grant Been Blessed is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Thank you for the welcome and I'm glad to be here ! I decided to homeschool because my husband will be stationed in Ft. Polk. We had been doing lots of researching as far as the school system in Louisiana, and we were very unsatisfied so we decided that homeschooling would be best for us.
    Y.GRANT

  4. #4
    MamaToHerRoo's Avatar
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    I completely understand about dissatisfaction with the school system. Fortunately, homeschooling is pretty easy in Louisiana. Did you send in you letter yet? If not, let me know and I can probably get you copies. You know that there are two options in Louisiana for homeschooling, right?
    Look forward to your posts.
    Linda
    Homeschooling one for 8 years and counting!

  5. #5
    conniep is offline Junior Member
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    Help...we have moved back to La. (moved from Missouri) and I am trying to find copies of what to send in to choose option 2. I can find descriptions of the options, but haven't found who to contact to get the form or if a letter, who to direct the letter to. Also looking for others in the Monroe area. We have used Time4Learning for 2 years now.

  6. #6
    MamaToHerRoo's Avatar
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    Hi Connie,
    Welcome! Are you speaking of the "Non-public school, not seeking state approval" option? If so, you can find the address to send the letter to HERE.
    The letter basically is this:

    Today's date 
     
    Dr. Jackie Bobbett, Section Supervisor
    Division of Curriculum Standards
    P.O. Box 94064-9064
    Baton Rouge, LA 70804
     
    Registered Non-Public School (Not Seeking State Approval)
    School Year:  August 1, 2011 thru July 31, 2012
    Name of School:  (Enter your school name here)
    Contact Information:
    (Enter your name, address, phone number, emal)

    Total Number of students: (enter your total number of students here)

    Thank you,
     
    (Be sure to sign your name)
    Send a copy to the address above. I send my return receipt requested. Usually within a week you get a letter back from the school board, with a copy of your letter, date stamped as received. This will be your confirmation that you are in compliance. Some parents carry a copy of this letter with them when they are out during school hours with their children, but I have never had need of it.
    I hope this helps. The other thing you can do is make your letter more "letter like" and less "form like".
    Something like this:
    Dr. Bobbett,
    In accordance with the Louisiana statute regarding Registerd Non-Public Schools, Not seeking approval, I would like to inform you that ABC Academy (use your own school name here) will begin classes on (enter the date you wanted to start your school year) for th 2011-2012 school year. ABC Academy (your school name) has a total enrollment of (enter your number of children of school age) child (ren).
    We will operate for 180 school days during the course of 2011-2012.

    Sincerely,
    (sign, and put your contact information)
    Then follow the same instructions regarding mailing. Either style works just fine, I use the letter form, but many of my homeschooling friends use the form type.
    Linda
    Homeschooling one for 8 years and counting!

  7. #7
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    I am wanting to visit the home school community in Leesville/Fort Polk. We use Classical Conversations and LOVE it! Is anyone interested in a play date with a purpose?? I'd love the discuss the pros of classical education and encourage the home school community

  8. #8
    Unregistered Guest

    Smile Help???

    I am moving to Barksdale, La in a few months and have decided to homeschool my two children. Only I'm not even sure where to being. First let me ask this, what is the main difference of enrolling in option 1 or option 2 under LA homeschooling laws?

  9. #9
    MamaToHerRoo's Avatar
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    Hi, welcome to Time4Learning and to Louisiana. Here are the differences as I understand them.

    Option 1 is the Home Study Program. Option 2 is the Private School, Not Seeking Approval (this means YOUR private school is not seeking to be accredited by the state of Louisiana).

    In Option 1 you ask for approval annually. In Option 2 you tell the state how many students are in your private school.

    In Option 1 you must submit proof that the home study program is providing an adequate education. Proof comes in the form of curriculum outlines, titles of books used, standardized test scores, and/or statements from qualified persons (letter, usually from a teacher certified in Louisiana, that your child is progressing at the level and speed a typical Louisiana public school student). In Option 2 all that is required is that you state how many students are in your private school, and what day it starts, and that you will hold school 180 days a year. You do not have to go into curriculum choices, what books you use, or get a statement from any third party.

    To this point Option 1 has the most dealings with the state, while Option 2 has almost no dealings with the state. Most people I know, including my family, opt for Option 2. It requires the least involvement with the Department of Education, oversight, or asking permission of the two options.

    However...

    if your students are high school aged, there is good reason to work under Option 1. To be eligable for the TOPS scholarship, the level o f which is dependent on ACT scores, your child must be registered with the state under Option 1, no later than 10th grade. Note that this option is unfair to homeschool students because the basic requirements for a TOPS award are 2 points higher than the traditional public school student score.
    For example, if a public school student must get a 17 ACT score to qualify for the Tech level award (the lowest scholarship amount) the home study student must get a 19. Honors level award (the highest scholarship amount) requires public school students to get a 26 ACT, home study student must get a 28!

    I do not understand why the standards are higher for home schooled students, but I believe that it is this way to discourage home education of high school students. If your home schooled child has to score 2 points higher on the ACT for TOPS, your student might choose to graduate from traditional school instead. Every student graduated increases the graduation rate of the state, which is not very high. Home schooled students who complete high school courses do not "graduate" and therefore are not included in the graduation rate numbers. This particular reasoning is purely speculation on my part.

    I hope this helps, feel free to ask any other questions you might have. And once again, welcome!
    Linda
    Homeschooling one for 8 years and counting!

  10. #10
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Moving to Fort Polk soon..

    I am a homeschool mom...been doing homeschool for three years now. I have a 16yr old, 9yr old, and 6yr old. I plan to keep homeschooling when we move in the fall, to Fort Polk. I would love to have contacts there that know the "lay of the land" on homeschooling.

    Quote Originally Posted by MamaToHerRoo View Post
    Hi, welcome to Time4Learning and to Louisiana. Here are the differences as I understand them.

    Option 1 is the Home Study Program. Option 2 is the Private School, Not Seeking Approval (this means YOUR private school is not seeking to be accredited by the state of Louisiana).

    In Option 1 you ask for approval annually. In Option 2 you tell the state how many students are in your private school.

    In Option 1 you must submit proof that the home study program is providing an adequate education. Proof comes in the form of curriculum outlines, titles of books used, standardized test scores, and/or statements from qualified persons (letter, usually from a teacher certified in Louisiana, that your child is progressing at the level and speed a typical Louisiana public school student). In Option 2 all that is required is that you state how many students are in your private school, and what day it starts, and that you will hold school 180 days a year. You do not have to go into curriculum choices, what books you use, or get a statement from any third party.

    To this point Option 1 has the most dealings with the state, while Option 2 has almost no dealings with the state. Most people I know, including my family, opt for Option 2. It requires the least involvement with the Department of Education, oversight, or asking permission of the two options.

    However...

    if your students are high school aged, there is good reason to work under Option 1. To be eligable for the TOPS scholarship, the level o f which is dependent on ACT scores, your child must be registered with the state under Option 1, no later than 10th grade. Note that this option is unfair to homeschool students because the basic requirements for a TOPS award are 2 points higher than the traditional public school student score.
    For example, if a public school student must get a 17 ACT score to qualify for the Tech level award (the lowest scholarship amount) the home study student must get a 19. Honors level award (the highest scholarship amount) requires public school students to get a 26 ACT, home study student must get a 28!

    I do not understand why the standards are higher for home schooled students, but I believe that it is this way to discourage home education of high school students. If your home schooled child has to score 2 points higher on the ACT for TOPS, your student might choose to graduate from traditional school instead. Every student graduated increases the graduation rate of the state, which is not very high. Home schooled students who complete high school courses do not "graduate" and therefore are not included in the graduation rate numbers. This particular reasoning is purely speculation on my part.

    I hope this helps, feel free to ask any other questions you might have. And once again, welcome!

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