help-QUESTIONS
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: help-QUESTIONS

  1. #1
    Unregistered Guest

    Default help-QUESTIONS

    So i am interested in home schooling my 8th grader for the first time. I see i need to pass in a curriculum plan with application to assistant superintendent. I see their are websites that offer curriculum programs( time 4 learning). If i use my time plus a online program what else will i need to be approved for home schooling? Also do i have to be home with my 8th grader every minute of the day? This is in massachusetts. Thank you

  2. #2
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    OR
    Posts
    6,894
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default Re: help-QUESTIONS

    I don't live in Massachusetts, but I went searching online and found this Massachusetts homeschooling information. It looks like Massachusetts is one of the few states where there are not clear-cut homeschool guidelines. Homeschools are considered private schools and you need to negotiate with the school superintendent regarding what method of evaluation to use and whether or not he/she will approve your curriculum.

    Time4Learning is an online curriculum that was developed to be used in public schools and is aligned with all state standards. In fact, the developer only provides it to schools. Time4Learning has acquired a license that allows them to offer it to families and individuals. You might want to direct the superintendent to the developer's website (Compass Learning Odyssey). Since it is a very popular public school curriculum, he or she may already be familiar with it.

    You might want to print the scope and sequence for each subject for your student's grade level. Here is information about the type of reports you will be able to generate to document your student's progress. If the superintendent wants you to use a portfolio review instead of testing at the year's end, here is a page that was written to help Time4Learning members prepare a homeschool portfolio.

    I don't see where the law addresses the parent's presence in the homeschool, either. Instead, it says you need to discuss the length of the school year and the school day with the superintendent. I would read How Long is a Homeschool Day, first, because your student will probably not be spending more than about four hours per day on the online lessons. I don't know of any states that require the parent to always be present; in fact, many working parents homeschool, setting a lesson schedule up for their student before they go to work in the morning and looking over the completed work and helping with any confusion after work.

    Unfortunately, it looks like Massachusetts isn't one of the may states where you can simply comply with notification and testing laws and be automatically approved. The state leaves it up to the superintendent. Hopefully, the above resources will help with your discussions with that person until someone from Massachusetts comes along and offers some advice based on experience in your state.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  3. #3
    reb621's Avatar
    reb621 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    IN
    Posts
    51

    Unhappy MA homeschooling adopted kiddos who receive adoption subsidy

    Kelly,
    This is helpful to show your child's progress in homeschool, but here's another question for you (or anyone with experience with this):

    The Dept of Children and Families requires adoptive (and likely foster) parents of 18+-year-olds to provide a "letter from the school" that states what the child's CURRENT GRADE LEVEL is as well as what the child's ANTICIPATED DATE OF GRADUATION is (month and year).

    As you can imagine, unless I write the letter myself (which they apparently won't allow), my family is very close to losing our adoption subsidy for this child. I suppose I can grab the Time4Learning logo and create an official-looking letterhead and write a short letter with the required info, but whose name would I sign??? The DCS worker told me today that they will NOT accept a letter from me ("because you could be lying"), and that I must provide a LETTER FROM THE SCHOOL. I told her multiple times that we homeschool and we use the T4L online curriculum. Her response? "Well, who's YOUR boss? Just have your boss (meaning at the "school") write the letter." Oh, my. I was about to reach through the phone and shake her! ("There is no boss, lady! It's just me! And I carry the weight of their futures on my shoulders, so give me a break already!" )

    Any ideas for me? (This particular kiddo is an 18-yr-old junior, and my next daughter turns 18 in May, but is also a junior this year. Good grief. Letter from the school. Ha! It's the school's fault my kids are so far behind to begin with. Well, that and a pretty traumatic beginning to their lives. )

  4. #4
    reb621's Avatar
    reb621 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    IN
    Posts
    51

    Default Re: help-QUESTIONS

    Ah, I found something useful...once logged in, I was able to print a "Membership Letter" that I am attaching to a letter I wrote myself giving her current "grade level" and "anticipated date of graduation." At least the membership letter shows that I'm not lying! Plus I printed the High School "Lesson Plans-Scope & Sequence" page (have to be logged in to get to that, I think) and have noted on that page which classes she has already taken and when as well as which ones she'll take next year for her senior year.

    I love that students can take ANY of the courses ANY of their high school years, but it would be nice if there was some indication somewhere (at least for parents to see) of what "grade level" the courses would normally be. But I'm hoping this will satisfy MA DCS.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •