Getting started with 7th grader
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  1. #1
    Annette is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Getting started with 7th grader

    We pulled our child out of 7th grade at the end of November. He was failing everything and having social problems as well. He is just not mature enough for the pace of the very rigorous public magnet school academics, plus the intense social pressure of middle school. There were unhealthy influences and he was constantly landing in the disciplinarian's office. What a nightmare. Anyway, we are loving having him home with us, he seems happier already. We plan to start T4L next week.

    My questions:

    Does anyone have any thoughts about the best way to jump in? I have explored the site and feel pretty comfortable with how it works. I thought I might suggest he start the lessons at the beginning of 7th grade, or I could suggest he take the tests and if he seems to know the material, move on to the next test until he feels he needs to do lessons.

    Does the playground work for someone his age? Do 12yos like the playground or is it youngish for them? He's a pretty dedicated video gamer and plays T and M games.

    He is really burned out on school and all the pressures that come with it. I want to make our "homeschooling" as gentle and self-directed as possible. Any suggestions from other parents, especially of people his age and in his situation, would be appreciated.

    Annette

  2. #2
    Yca's Avatar
    Yca
    Yca is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Getting started with 7th grader

    welcome, annette! you'll find that lots of times, when a parent pulls a child out of school, tehy don't jump straight into another curriculum, but rather take some time to chill out and "unschool" or "deprogram". sometimes, if a child has had a particularly difficult time, its best just to take a step back and decompress. do things that provide educational value, but are non-stress. go to museums, science centers, take an art class together, etc.

    after that, going thru and having him take tests is a popular way to find exact placement - most that have switched over have used that method. if he doesnt' struggle on a test, you know he's fairly comfortable with the material. if he has a couple of problems, you might want to review it, if he bombs it, you know he hasn't had time to study it yet.

    hope that helps, let us know how it goes.
    ~ Yca ~
    (otherwise known as Jess )

    Wife to Dave and Mom to Red - 13, The Princess - 11, Fluffyheaded Diva - 6, and Sir Smiley - 3
    Read about our adventures HERE!


  3. #3
    Annette is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Re: Getting started with 7th grader

    Thank you!
    Annette

  4. #4
    SahmIam is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Getting started with 7th grader

    Welcome, Annette!

    It sounds like Jess has you covered, but if you have any other questions, don't hesitate to ask.
    Melissa.

  5. #5
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Default Re: Getting started with 7th grader

    Annette, you might consider placing him fifth or sixth grade science and social studies to begin with. Most seventh graders who have not previously used Time4Learning find those lessons plenty challenging. There is no seventh or eighth grade science and no eighth grade social studies, so you wouldn't run out of lessons so quickly if you placed him lower. After about fourth grade, the science and social studies lessons don't get more difficult. The difference is mainly in content, so it's fine for him to study a technically "lower" level.

    You also might consider allowing him to take notes to use on his science and social studies quizzes and tests. Note taking is a valuable skill to learn. You have to really analyze what you are learning in order to decide what is important enough to write down. Being able to use notes during test taking minimizing frustration for many students. This would be a great way to help minimize stress for him, without compromising his education. You don't want him "memorizing" trivia just long enough to "pass" a test anyway, do you?

    I use Time4Learning's eighth grade algebra (intended for advanced middle schoolers) for my high school age students. They have all enjoyed the playground so far . . . some games more than others, of course!

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

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