Help.... What is considered a "lesson"
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  1. #1
    alishahs is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Help.... What is considered a "lesson"

    Hi. I'm an Aussie living in China and have just started homeschooling my 5 year old as it is SO expensive here to send your kids to international school.
    Ok, I have read the GETTING STARTED GUIDE and have worked out how many lessons to do each day. I'm a little confused and want to know what is considered a DAILY LESSON or ACTIVITY. I need to do 5 weekly LA activities and am not quite sure that we are doing it right!?!?!
    Here is my example..... So I click on LA and the first heading says print awareness. When I click into Print Awareness there are two other subheadings called BACKGROUND & STORY and SOUNDS, LETTERS & WORDS. When I click onto Background and Story there are 4 activities with Star pictures above the headings. Are those 4 activities in BACKGROUND & STORY considered 1 daily lesson OR is it every single activity within the Print Awareness Section (meaning all the activities within the Sounds Letters & Words section too).
    Is anyone following me????

  2. #2
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    The problem is that parents are usually accustomed to defining a lesson as "the amount of work a student does on any given subject in one day". That isn't the definition used by Time4Learning.

    Time4Learning considers each subject a "book", divided into "chapters", which are divided into "lessons", which are further divided into "lesson activities". The "lesson activities" are those four activities with starts that you refer to. Access the lesson plans by logging in as a parent to find out how many lesson activities there are per subject. That will give you an idea of how many lesson activities per day your student must do in order to complete a level during a school year. (Divide the number of lesson activities available by the number of days in your school year.)

    Please let me know if you are still confused.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  3. #3
    alishahs is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default 5 minutes a day...?!?

    Thanks for your response.
    I have already accessed the lesson plans by logging in as a parent and finding out how many lesson activities there are per subject: 199 LA and divided that by 40 to get me 5 lessons a week etc... I understand all that. What I don't understand is what is the definition of a Language Arts activity? If it is, like you explained, just one star then that only takes my son 5 minutes to do. I have signed up with Time for Learning to be his full home school curriculum while we are living here in China. I don't want him to be loaded with hours of work but 5 minutes of LA per day and then 2 Math activities a week just doesn't seem like enough...he himself wants to do more. If he does more and goes ahead then he will finish his school year in a few months. Please advise.
    Thanks.

  4. #4
    alishahs is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Kelly, thanks for your response.
    I have accessed the lesson plans by logging in as a parent and found out that there are 199 LA activities, and there are 40 weeks in our school year. That means my son needs to do about 5 lesson activities per day. I understand all of that. What confuses me is the definition of the lesson activity, which I understand from what you are saying is one of the activities within the "lesson" that has a star above it. If that is the case, that means my son is doing one "star" lesson activity a day (which takes him about 5-10 mins). I have signed up with Time4Learning to be used as a full home school curriculum and 5 minutes of LA a day and 2 math activities per week doesn't seem like enough to me? If my son goes ahead and completes more lesson activities than what is required, then we will finish in a few months.
    Any advice?

  5. #5
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Hi. You might be interested in this article from the Time4Learning Homeschool Online blog: How Long is a Homeschool Day?

    Kindergartners need a lot of practical application of their lessons. Consider the kindergarten lesson about parts of a book. In a traditional school setting, the teacher would take a forty-five minute class period to teach and reinforce this concept. First, she would explain about the different parts of a book. (That's what the first part of the online lesson does.) Since she has many students, she would randomly ask questions of a few students to make sure they all understood. They wouldn't all "get it" the first time, so she would re-explain some of it in different language until most of the students indicated that they understood.

    Then, there would be some practical application designed to reinforce what they had learned. She might show some books and ask certain of the students: Who was the author of this book? Where can you find the title?

    Finally, she might give them a worksheet to do. Remember, kindergarten worksheets often contain only four to six exercises. This worksheet might show pictures of books and ask the student to circle the titles or try and guess from the cover picture what the book is about.

    Homeschooling accomplishes all of this much more efficiently, because you aren't dealing with the traditional school issues of crowd control. (See Education or Crowd Control? on the blog. )

    If you stay aware of what your student is studying, you can find opportunities throughout the day to reinforce what he is learning. An obvious example would be to discuss the parts of a book during his bedtime story. I sit with my kindergarten kids during their lessons because, as you have found, it doesn't take a lot of time. It would be nice if very young kids could do ALL their learning on the computer, but that isn't the best way to educate them at this age, so Time4Learning encourages additional, hands-on activities.

    Beginning in first grade, Time4Learning provides optional, printable resources for parents who want more. In kindergarten, the printable resources consist of the little readers from the online program. It's great to print these off and keep them sitting around for your child to read over and over . . . or, if he isn't reading, you can read them to him.

    Most parents include penmanship in their language arts program. You might want to use a site like SpellingCity to generate handwriting worksheets with words you choose from the online lessons. Again, most kindergartners can only print a few words before their attention span is exhausted.

    Another option is to email [email protected] and request to have the preschool program added to your student's account. Allow him to go through the preschool program at his own rate, and to do the activities there as often as desired.

    You can also search for coloring pages online to support the theme . . . and there's more to do than just color them. They can be painted, decorated with stickers or glitter, printed on cardboard so they can have holes punched in them to be laced, cut out and glued to construction paper, etc.

    You may also come up with ideas of your own. For the "parts of a book" lesson, I had my kindergartener make her own book, which took up an hour! Just fold some paper and staple it together. Add a construction paper cover if you have it. Help her write her name as the author and illustrator.

    Last, but not least, the Time4Learning Playground includes many educational activities that you can allow your child to explore.

    It's actually BETTER to quit while he still wants "more". It keeps the initial enthusiasm from dwindling. Formal kindergarten activities shouldn't take more than one or two hours per day. The rest of othe day should be spent painting, modeling with clay, playing with blocks or cars, playing in the sandbox, "helping" Mom or Dad, and so forth. Although my children's school day is usually over at noon, we do not allow TV, videogames, etc. until four p.m. That way, they are "forced" to find worthwhile play opportunities (and we do consider building forts, Legos, and other creative play to be "worthwhile".)

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  6. #6
    alishahs is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Thanks :)

    Thank you so much for all your advice! It all sounds GREAT to me. I am just new at this and its not something I am doing by choice so I've been a little lost.....
    Also sorry there are 2 replys from me.... the first one I thought got lost somehow (the page just wasn't loading) so I had to try and remember what I wrote and re-type it... he he. Sorry.
    Thanks again for all your help. I'm sure I will get into a routine of things soon... finger crossed.
    Alisha

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    Yca's Avatar
    Yca
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    alisha - no worries ... it takes us all a bit to get used to it. and even then, there are days when we wake up suddenly clueless and incapable of functioning
    ~ Yca ~
    (otherwise known as Jess )

    Wife to Dave and Mom to Red - 13, The Princess - 11, Fluffyheaded Diva - 6, and Sir Smiley - 3
    Read about our adventures HERE!


  8. #8
    JenniR is offline Junior Member
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    Hi there,

    Can I add a question to this thread?

    Like you Alisha, I have worked out the lessons needed to be done in a week according to the scope & sequence, then while going through what they'll be doing in a day, I'm wondering if the quizzes at the end of the lessons are included in the amount of lessons per week, or is that extra? Do they complete the quiz and not tick that off as a lesson/activity? Does that make sense?

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