How does a student use the Notepad or whatever it is called?
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  1. #1
    TwiMom is offline Junior Member
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    Default How does a student use the Notepad or whatever it is called?

    Do all students have access to the notepad? My son and I just started using T4L and we have run across a few things that ask him to Write in his Notebook. I didn't know that there would be anything like that with this program. He does LA 1, Math 1, Science 4 (could go higher since I think it will be too easy) and history 4 (again, might go higher level since it looks to be too easy).

    My son has AS and is dyslexic so I have to read everything unless it is read to him, but he is going through the assignments really quickly.

    Also, what is the LA Extensions suppose to represent? He did something today and it seemed more like science than LA???

  2. #2
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    It's good to have a spiral or three-ring notebook handy for the text based lessons. A few of them will instruct the student to write in their notebook, and it means just that . . . a real, paper notebook! Often, when my kids were younger, we would just discuss these activities.

    All of the language arts extensions are based on science and social studies themes. The first lesson in each unit will give information about the theme. The rest of the lessons in that unit will be language activities that support the theme. This is a great way to integrate language with other subjects. Since there are not many actual science and social studies lessons at the lower levels, this is also a way to add additional study for those subjects.

    I have had my kids in grades 1 and 2 do the language arts first and then do the language arts extensions. The reason for this is that the regular language arts program focuses on reading and phonics. The readers are decodable and "easier" than the readers in the language arts extensions. By the time they finish the regular language arts lessons, they are ready for the extensions. Also, both LA and LA Extensions give writing assignments using Story Creator. When two of these are assigned at once, it's usually too much writing. Lastly, by the time the student has finished the regular language arts, they have also finished the limited science and social studies lessons and are ready to benefit from the science and social studies themes in the language arts extensions.

    That's just how I worked it out for my own kids. From third grade and on, I had them do LA and LA Extensions at the same time.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  3. #3
    TwiMom is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks for the info.

    Since my son has AS it is difficult for him to write (he HATES writing actually) so that is why I asked. He is 13 and I just want him to get a better grasp on things, so we are doing the lower grades for the LA and Math. The Science and History (Social Studies) we could do in the higher classes, but I want him to get the reading in.

    Okay, since the LA Extensions covers science and history maybe we will continue those as well.

    I will just need to tweek some things so he can get everything done and doesn't get overwhelmed.

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