An hour of instruction is not a literal hour. Is that true?
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  1. #1
    Polly Ann Gulley is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Question An hour of instruction is not a literal hour. Is that true?

    I'm new to home schooling. I have been home schooling my granddaughter who just turned 7 since the first part of March. I use Time 4 Learning which by the way has been a God sent for us. My question is; Is it true that an hour of instruction according to Missouri law doesn't really mean a literal hour? If a math lesson is finished in say 20 minutes it can count as a literal hour? I'm confused. I have been counting every minute almost right down to the second. I want my granddaughter to have the best that I can provide for her. She wasn't getting anything in public school. That is why her mommy and daddy and I chose to home school her. Help Please. Thank you, Polly Gulley

    PS: I was also wondering if there were anymore grandma's out there home schooling.

  2. #2
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    Default Missouri Hours

    Quote Originally Posted by Polly Ann Gulley View Post
    I'm new to home schooling. I have been home schooling my granddaughter who just turned 7 since the first part of March. I use Time 4 Learning which by the way has been a God sent for us. My question is; Is it true that an hour of instruction according to Missouri law doesn't really mean a literal hour? If a math lesson is finished in say 20 minutes it can count as a literal hour? I'm confused. I have been counting every minute almost right down to the second. I want my granddaughter to have the best that I can provide for her. She wasn't getting anything in public school. That is why her mommy and daddy and I chose to home school her. Help Please. Thank you, Polly Gulley

    PS: I was also wondering if there were anymore grandma's out there home schooling.
    No, a hour is a hour. Most people will count 45min as an hour.
    I use the T4L duration report to get a good running time. Then I add up all the reading time and field trip times. You need 600 core hours and 400 non-core hours from July 1st thru June 30.

  3. #3
    Tricia7659 is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Hi Polly, I'm also a grandma(nanny) homeschooling her DGD. We just recently joined T4L so still learning our way around.

  4. #4
    MamaToHerRoo's Avatar
    MamaToHerRoo is offline Senior Member
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    Welcome! I think there are probably a fair number of grandparents homeschooling their grandchildren. And then there are parents like me, I'm 38 years older than my daughter, which puts me in the grandparent age group! I realize there are differences in homeschooling your child, or your grandchild, but sometimes it feels like I'm her grandmother instead of her mother. The world she is growing up in is so much different than the world I grew up in.

    As for the time issue, it is an actual hour. Just remember that a lot of things can be counted as school. Health and physical education would encompass not only teaching about healthy eating, but time spent playing or participating in organized sports like soccer, martial arts, swimming, horseback riding, tennis, etc.

    Don't forget to include reading time in hours of school. Educational videos and educational games like those found at Learning Games for Kids can also be included in instructional time.
    Linda
    Homeschooling one for 8 years and counting!

  5. #5
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    Default Age of Grandparent

    Hello, I am also of the grandparent age. I adopted two children at a way older age.

  6. #6
    MamaToHerRoo's Avatar
    MamaToHerRoo is offline Senior Member
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    We are glad to have you. I think it is very brave to adopt children when you are older. I hope that homeschooling works out well for your family!
    Linda
    Homeschooling one for 8 years and counting!

  7. #7
    Barbara Wilson is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    No, a hour is a hour. Most people will count 45min as an hour.
    I use the T4L duration report to get a good running time. Then I add up all the reading time and field trip times. You need 600 core hours and 400 non-core hours from July 1st thru June 30.
    If you started in August instead of July 1st - can you make up the time? We started August 26th. Guess I missed that one big time - I thought homeschooling kept to the same public school start and end dates.

  8. #8
    MamaToHerRoo's Avatar
    MamaToHerRoo is offline Senior Member
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    The homeschool year has start and end dates for record keeping purposes for the state. You can make up the time, no worries! The start and end dates actually give you longer to make the hours than a traditional school year. Your start in August will be fine. Consider that if you have school for 180 days at about 5.5-5.6 hours per day you will easily meet your 600+400 hours. Feel free to ask any questions you might have and happy homeschooling!
    Linda
    Homeschooling one for 8 years and counting!

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