No diploma issue
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Thread: No diploma issue

  1. #1
    dani747 is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default No diploma issue

    Hi all, hoping for some advice.

    We are homeschooling but under a private umbrella school. My question is just how big of a deal is it to not have an accredited high school diploma? I get that many colleges do not care as they are having the child take a placement test anyway, but what about the kids that are not going to college?

    We have a child that has special needs and will not be able to attend college. How hard is it going to be for her to get a job when she does not have an accredited high school degree? I do not think she will be able to sit through and pass a GED honestly. Test taking throws her completely! Maybe, with a great deal of work and hand holding we could get her through an on-line accredited high school, but it would be extremely stressful for her and me for that matter.

    Is the world going to accept a non-accredited, parent issued high school diploma, or is she going to be in a horrible situation for finding work?

    Can a kid go to an on-line community college with a non-accredited diploma without having to take placement tests?

    Thanks so much, Dani

  2. #2
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Dani, my eldest three kids have a homeschool diploma, signed by me. I went the extra mile of getting a letter from the school district, saying we homeschooled legally and were in compliance with all of our state's homeschool laws. I keep this with their diplomas, but we've never needed it. All of mine started in a community college, where they weren't the least bit interested in seeing the diploma.

    They have also gotten jobs at one time or another that required a high school diploma. In only one case did the employer want proof of graduation. My daughter took her nice looking high school diploma, in its lovely padded case, in to the Human Resources department. They photo copied it, and that was that.

    I'm not saying your student might not have difficulty with a particular employer or school, but here are some tips to make it less likely:

    Make a professional looking diploma. Many of those available online just leave a blank line for you to write in your student's name. Don't use those. Use nice paper (parchment or something) and have the student's name printed on it. I ordered one with a nice padded cover. You usually have a choice in wording, and many homeschool diplomas have "Homeschool Diploma" printed at the top, instead of the name of a high school. I chose to have my kids' say "High School Diploma".

    Don't apologize that it's "only" a homeschool diploma. Assume a homeschool diploma will be sufficient. If you ask whether the employer or school accepts homeschool diplomas, you make it easy for them to say "no". If you don't ask, the employer or school is put in the position of needing to (a) notice it's a homeschool diploma and (b) make an issue of it. Many won't do either.

    If challenged, be confident. Pull out the letter from the school district that says you homeschooled legally. Point out that homeschooling is a legal option in all fifty states. Ask to see written policy saying homeschool diplomas aren't acceptable. Many people might initially assume a homeschool diploma isn't okay, but few really know the law or their company's policy (if there is one). When you are confident, they often realize they have doubts.

    Students with any kind of diploma are expected to take entrance tests for most colleges. Just having a diploma from an accredited high school will not eliminate the testing requirement. Sometimes it depends on the classes they want to take, but many college classes have prerequisites relating to test scores. If your student has documented special needs, you can ask for accommodations, such as extra time on the test, having it read aloud to her, taking it with pencil and paper instead of on computer, etc.

    The best place to learn about homeschooling high school is Let's Homeschool High School.com.
    lovehmschlg and Reandeau like this.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  3. #3
    monnalu is offline Member
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    In California, to be eligible to take the NCLEX (Nursing Licensing Examination) and the be licensed as a vocational (practical) nurse or registered nurse, the person must have a high school diploma. I have read the regulations extensively and I cannot find any place that it says the diploma must be from an accredited high school. A special needs learner may not be aspiring to become nurse, but whatever she plans to do it is good to check out the regulations for that certificate or license.

  4. #4
    dani747 is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Thank you so much for the information! It all makes good sense. Look and act like you know what you are doing and folks won't bother raising a fuss. I really appreciate your time.

  5. #5
    MPA
    MPA is offline Junior Member
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    Hello,
    My name is Lori. I have home schooled kids for the last twenty year...First my children and now my grandchildren...
    my daughter has entered several colleges using only a homeschool diploma one being Art Institute... another being
    Ashford University... While no placement test is needed, she has to agree to take certain entrance classes.
    I hope this helps

  6. #6
    foxbridgeacademy is offline Junior Member
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    Clovis Community College (in New Mexico) offers online classes. I think that as long as you are not a degree seeking student you can take the classes without taking any placement tests (they use the Accuplacer). Later after you have a few classes with decent grades you can switch to a degree seeking student. I think this info is still accurate.

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