Accreditation
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Thread: Accreditation

  1. #1
    KNimmo is offline Junior Member
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    Default Accreditation

    I need some clarification on accreditation. I understand that accreditation doesn't apply to T4L because it is a curriculum, not a school. We see other homeschool curricula that says, We have AdvancED Accreditation. What is that, and how do those programs compare with T4L? Aren't they all "curricula," and not schools? I just want to make sure my daughter will be accepted by colleges. My email is [email protected] com. Thank you.

  2. #2
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Default Re: Accreditation

    Hi. Colleges do not require a student to have attended an accredited school to be accepted. Hospitals and other institutions can also be accredited, so the word does not mean what people often assume it means. Being accredited just means the institution has fulfilled the accreditation requirements of "someone, somewhere". These all vary and often include things like number or location of fire extinguishers. Unless you know the requirements of an accrediting agency, knowing an organization is "accredited" doesn't really tell you much.

    Many people mistakenly think of online schools as "homeschooling". There is a big difference. If something is saying it is accredited, it is an online school and not a homeschool curriculum. Many online schools will come up in a search of "homeschool" because they know people will accidentally use that term to search for them.

    When homeschooling, the parent is required to follow the homeschool laws in the student's state of residence. Online schools are required to follow the school laws (NOT homeschool laws) in the state where the school is located.

    When homeschooling, the parent will choose a curriculum and decide how to use it. Time4Learning is one curriculum you might choose. An online school will require a specific curriculum and tell you how to use it.

    When homeschooling, the parent creates, maintains, signs, and stands behind any documents the student needs. An online school will create, maintain, sign, and stand behind documents themselves. Time4Learning does provide templates within your parent dashboard that you can use to create your child's transcript and diploma.

    All fifty states allow a parent to issue a homeschool diploma for their own child. Employers are not allowed to discriminate against homeschool diplomas. Colleges are more interested in a student's entrance exam scores than in how they learned what they know. Many colleges actively recruit homeschooled students.

    It is for this reason that I encourage homeschool families to focus not on "getting through" a certain amount of work, but on the student actually learning and committing the material to their long-term memory. It will do no good to show on paper that the student has "taken" chemistry and perhaps earned a passing grade if they can't demonstrate that they still know the concepts.

    The best place to learn about homeschooling high school is the Let's Homeschool High School site.

    I hope this helped answer some of your questions and perhaps eased your mind a bit.

    Welcome to the forum!

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  3. #3
    KNimmo is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Accreditation

    Thank you so much for the info. Makes much better sense to me now. I just didn't want to get 3-4 years down the road and realize we've hit a roadblock regarding college admissions.

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