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  1. #1
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    Default Confused

    I'm homeschooling my teenager for 10th grade and maybe longer. I don't know how to participate? He does activities daily and I feel I need to do more or find worksheets for him like his school did. I don't know if he's learning. I'm also worried about the social aspects, how will he meet people now? Just a ball of nerves since I started this but he was just not able to go to public schools, struggled for years and no longer wanted to medicate him to just get him to go daily.

  2. #2
    Cardona.jessica.m is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Confused

    Hi. I know exactly how you feel. You are worried he is not learning what he is supposed to. I have those same worries. One of my friends who have home schooled all her children told me, the great thing about home school is you get to choose what they learn and what they excel in. My daughter doesn't like Social Studies however loves Math, so I only did some subjects for social studies such as geography as I know she will need that as an adult. However nothing to do with the Wars from the past as it wouldn't be useful for her for her future unless she planned to go into a field that required knowledge of History. Which I highly doubt she will with her lack of interest in it. I also made sure I challenged her with her current grade level and if she does well with that, I plan to up her math for a 6th grade level.

    As for the social aspect. I joined some home school groups via Facebook and met some great people to meet up with. They have all kinds of events for home school children to socialize. I would also considering putting him in a sport if possible through home school programs or non school affiliated programs.

    Hope that helps!
    Jessica

    Quote Originally Posted by Jkrouse46 View Post
    I'm homeschooling my teenager for 10th grade and maybe longer. I don't know how to participate? He does activities daily and I feel I need to do more or find worksheets for him like his school did. I don't know if he's learning. I'm also worried about the social aspects, how will he meet people now? Just a ball of nerves since I started this but he was just not able to go to public schools, struggled for years and no longer wanted to medicate him to just get him to go daily.

  3. #3
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Default Re: Confused

    Hi! Welcome, welcome!

    When homeschooling, the parent is the teacher, so you're absolutely correct in thinking you need to "participate". Time4Learning makes that pretty easy, though. Think of it as a fun online alternative to buying a stack of textbooks! (It's cheapter, too. High school textbooks are super expensive.) And the parent doesn't have to teach everything "from scratch" (although you should be available to answer questions when they arise). I've learned a lot over the years from saying, "I don't know, but let's find out together." Then we research the answer. After homeschooling six kids, I'm really smart now! (Said tongue-in-cheek . . .)

    Just as you would not hand a stack of textbooks to your child and say, "Go learn," you shouldn't give them their login information for Time4Learning and then step aside. Parents need to log in to their parent account each day to view their child's reports. Reports detail time spent on each activity and a percentage score for scored activities. (Some activities are not scored, because they are designed for teaching . . . not for assessment. Compare those activities to a teacher, standing in front of the class and explaining how to do something. Students aren't graded on that, even if they answer a few of the teacher's questions in the process.)

    It's also a great idea to print a report for each subject every week. The scores remain available as long as your membership doesn't lapse, but technology isn't perfect. Time4Learning is no more likely to experience a glitch than anything else that's online, but better safe than sorry! A paper back-up is always a good idea.

    Also look at the lesson plans/scope and sequence (under Resources in your parent login account, at the top right of the page). If your student has completed a worksheet, you will find the answer key there . . . and parents need to grade worksheets. Parents also grade writing assignments. If you see "N/A" on your student's reports in the score column for an Odyssey Writer activity, click on it to be taken to what your child has written. You can then print and grade it manually.

    Did you set up a plan for your child? You can do that by logging in to your parent account and clicking on Create Plan. Here are step-by-step instructions for using the Activity Planner. Your student can just work at their own rate, but it does sometimes help for them to have that tab when they log in that tells them exactly what they need to do. (The tab will only appear if you have set up a plan.)

    The best place to learn about homeschooling high school (with printable transcript and diploma templates and loads of helpful information) is Let's Homeschool High School.com.

    Time4Learning isn't an online school. It's a homeschool curriculum. You are the teacher, and you decide what your student must do to graduate from your family's home school. All fifty states allow a parent to issue a homeschool diploma to their own child. Employers are required to treat the homeschool diploma of a student who was homeschooled legally the same as any other high school diploma, so be sure you follow your state's homeschool laws. (Each state has its own homeschool laws. The best place to find these is on your state's Department of Education website.) Colleges are more interested in a student's placement scores than in how the student learned what they know, and many colleges actively recruit homeschooled students.

    That's a lot to take in! I hope it answers some of your questions and eases your mind. We'd love to hear more from you in the general forums, below.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  4. #4
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Default Re: Confused

    I just noticed that you said, ". . . for the tenth grade and maybe longer . . . ", so I'd like to be sure you understand that Time4Learning itself does not award high school credits for the courses. It is very easy for your student to graduate from your family's homeschool high school, but it can be more challenging to mix homeschooling with public school. Public schools vary in their willingness to accept non-public-school work for credit. There are no laws saying what they must or may not accept, so it often comes down to the opinion of the individual you speak with at the school, although some schools have made rules that apply to their own school, to be consistent.

    So don't assume your child's homeschool credits will be accepted at your local public school. Check ahead of time. Again, this isn't an issue if you homeschool all the way through high school.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

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