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  1. #1
    Amylou is offline Junior Member
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    Default New to T4L

    Hello! I withdrew my 12 year old from school over the Christmas break and after researching the various programs out there, decided on time 4 learning. I have actually started him in 6th grade, though he was in 7th (and failing) when I pulled him out of school. I presently have him on the schedule of: 1 hr Math, 1/2 hr other modules, daily.

    - Do those of you experienced with this system think that the time I've required is enough?

    - Do you think I should have started him on grade level?

    - How do I check the total hours he's worked in a day/week/month? I can only seem to find the individual times he's worked on modules (for example: 7 minutes, 5 minutes, etc...) I'm sure I could just add up all of the times, but if there's a daily cumulative time somewhere, please let me know

  2. #2
    jpenn's Avatar
    jpenn is offline Senior Member
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    Amylou, I would definitely start him right where you did. I might even start off slowly because he needs time to "deschool" really. You might break his math up into two 30 minute slots if need be. He will have access to grades 5, 6, and 7 within each subject. That is great for times when he above in one area and behind in another.

    Just remember, homeschooling is NOT like brick and mortar school. You choose the way you want to do things. If you want to school outside, go for it. If you want to school at the kitchen table or on the couch, go for it. Do what works for your son and you. Take breaks as needed. Include fun field trips, join a homeschool co-op, find a homeschool support group... Encourage your son to get involved in homeschool sports if he likes that sort of thing.

    You are checking his hours correctly. You will need to add them up. You can select the type of reports you want to see...tests only, lessons only...You can save them to your hard drive, transfer to a jump drive, print them off...

    Here is a great e-book for families new to homeschooling. It was written by homeschoolers and is comprehensive without being overwhelming.

    The links below will help you navigate Time4Learning just a bit eaiser:
    '
    Hints and Help

    Getting Started with Time4Learning


    Have your son try one of our sister sites, Vocabulary Fun. It is free to use and has lots for his grade and age level. You can also use another of our sister sites, Vocabulary Spelling City for free.
    Joyfully,
    Jackie

  3. #3
    MamaToHerRoo's Avatar
    MamaToHerRoo is offline Senior Member
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    Amylou,
    I have a different way of looking at how long my child works on something. She is capable of wasting a great deal of time because she gets easily distracted. So I can't say, work on math for 1 hour. Because from the time we start the clock, until an hour later, she might do 3 math assignments, or not even make it through one because she decided to draw a detailed dragon instead of doing math. Instead of giving her time limits, I tell her how many lessons she has to accomplish in each subject for the day. When she is finished, she is done with school. It is incentive for her to manage her time better, and not mess around. She is in control of whether school takes her 3 hours or 10 hours, by how focused she manages to stay. My daughter is working on 6th grade work also.
    Anyway, I thought I would just add the way we decide what is done in a day, and how long it should take for us. The way I decide how many lessons she has to do in each subject is by using the worksheet on the lesson planning page. I hope that helps.

    Happy homeschooling!
    Linda
    Homeschooling one for 8 years and counting!

  4. #4
    Amylou is offline Junior Member
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    Thank you both so much for your input! I can see how he is easily distracted, so I think I'm going to try the "do these lessons today" approach. I hate feeling like I'm fumbling through all of this, and believe me deciding to pull him from school was not an easy one. His older sister went through and graduated without issue, and I loved school growing up. He just has such a different learning style. And I have been adding field trips just in the few weeks we've been doing this. I'll tap him on the shoulder and say "let's go to the zoo!" and hand him a printed out exercise he has to do while we're there. Like "what was your favorite animal", "what animals did we see that are nocturnal", that kind of thing. He seems to enjoy the spontaneity. Again, thank you for your ideas, they've helped me a ton!

    Amylou

  5. #5
    MamaToHerRoo's Avatar
    MamaToHerRoo is offline Senior Member
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    I understand what you mean about different learning styles. I don't know if ADHD is an issue with your son, but for my it is a serious issue. I have decided that some portions of the way she learns might be different than what a brick and mortar school would expect, but that it is perfectly "normal" for her to learn the way she does. Her learning style is not a failing on her part, she is perfectly capable of learning. The failing was on the part of an institutional school setting designed to educate many children at one time, regardless of their individual needs. I've been homeschooling for 5 years now, and have discovered more and more homeschoolers who say that their children just don't learn like other children do (meaning: like the children do in public school, or even private school).
    It is the individualized attention and customized education that allows our children who learn "differently" to thrive in homeschool.
    I had another homeschool mom tell me that taking her son out of an education system that was designed to turn out cookie-cutter, white, fuel-efficient, subcompact cars, and deciding to homeschool her son allowed him to be the finely tuned, dynamic, fuel-injected, high-end racing machine she knew he could be. I thought that was pretty cool!
    Linda
    Homeschooling one for 8 years and counting!

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