Considering Homeschool, but need to keep public school & college open
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    nova13442 is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Considering Homeschool, but need to keep public school & college open

    I saw this curriculum isn't accredited because it's not a brick and mortar school. The site says "most" colleges and universities don't require that anymore. Can someone explain what colleges and universities in NC would accept this as the home school for high school? I have an 8th grader now, considering to move her to home school as soon as possible.

    Also, we have an early college high school program that lets students graduate with a high school diploma and an associates degree. I'd like to be able to transfer her back to that school if she would get accepted. Will the credits from her 8th grade study in this program easily transfer back into the public school forum if she would get accepted? (If she isn't accepted, i would be continuing her in home school through high school graduation.)

    Also, how difficult is it to transfer to home school mid-year? We are about a month into our school year, so I don't think there would be any critical academic impacts, but wondering if anyone has any experiences they can share?

    Thank you.

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    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Default Re: Considering Homeschool, but need to keep public school & college open

    Hi! There's so much to know when you're just beginning! Welcome to the parent forum, and I'll try to answer your questions one-by-one, below. It will be long!

    Quote Originally Posted by nova13442 View Post
    I saw this curriculum isn't accredited because it's not a brick and mortar school.
    No homeschool curriculum is accredited. A school can be accredited, even if it's an online school. It doesn't have to do with whether it's a brick-and-mortar school.

    Time4Learning is not an online school. It is a homeschool curriculum provider. Schools can be accredited, but a curriculum can't. Hospitals and other institutions can also be accredited, so the word often doesn't mean what someone assumes it means, despite appearing to contain the word "credit" (which is what stumps people).

    There is no such thing as an accredited homeschool curriculum. (There are accredited online schools, which are subject to school laws instead of homeschool laws.)


    Quote Originally Posted by nova13442 View Post
    The site says "most" colleges and universities don't require that anymore. Can someone explain what colleges and universities in NC would accept this as the home school for high school? I have an 8th grader now, considering to move her to home school as soon as possible.
    Here's one list, but it isn't exhaustive. You can check with the college your student is interested in attending in advance, but the reality is that you might get a different answer, depending on who you ask.

    For my kids, I filled out the college applications and assumed my children't homeschool transcripts would be accepted, choosing to address it later (by shouting "discrimination!") if they weren't. Homeschooling is legal in all fifty states. Five of my six have attended colleges so far, and three have transferred from one college to another. We have never had a problem with our parent-signed homeschool diplomas and transcripts being accepted. We are in Oregon. Some states' homeschool laws address how their colleges must handle homeschool graduates. From what I can find, NC leaves it up to the college.

    https://letshomeschoolhighschool.com/2019/02/09/homeschool-friendly-colleges-in-north-carolina/

    Quote Originally Posted by nova13442 View Post
    Also, we have an early college high school program that lets students graduate with a high school diploma and an associates degree. I'd like to be able to transfer her back to that school if she would get accepted. Will the credits from her 8th grade study in this program easily transfer back into the public school forum if she would get accepted? (If she isn't accepted, i would be continuing her in home school through high school graduation.)
    This is the general "homeschooling high school" information I have prepared for parents who are just starting. The answer to your question is at the bottom, but the rest is important information, too.

    When homeschooling, the parent is the legally recognized "teacher of record" who creates, maintains, signs, and stands behind any documents related to their child's education. All fifty states allow a parent to issue a homeschool diploma for their own child. Employers are not allowed to discriminate against a homeschool diploma. Colleges are more interested in a student's entrance exam scores than in how they learned what they know. Many colleges actively recruit homeschooled students.

    Time4Learning does provide templates within your parent dashboard to help you create your child's diploma and transcript.

    When homeschooling, the parent decides what the student must do to graduate from the family's home school. The parent decides how many credits they need, and in which subjects. The parent decides how many hours of work equals a credit. Many parents look at various high schools' graduation requirements online and model their requirements after some of those, changing things to suit their own child's interests and future goals. Every high school will have different graduation requirements and even students from the same high school will graduate having studied different things, so there is not one magic formula.

    For example, a high school might require two credits in science to graduate. One student may fulfill that requirement by studying chemistry and physics, and another might choose earth science and biology instead.

    In addition to the academic courses Time4Learning offers, parents also give credit for things like arts and crafts, piano lessons or music practice, organized sports or driveway basketball with a friend, Scouts, 4H, church or other organizational activities, volunteer work or part time jobs, the educational portion of family outings or vacations, and casual parental instruction in things like cooking or auto mechanics.

    Here are two articles that are often of interest to families who are just beginning to homeschool a high school student:

    Defending the Diploma
    The Truth about Homeschool Diplomas

    It can be quite straightforward for your child to graduate from your family's home school, since you will have custom designed a plan just for him. If you think you might consider sending him back to public school in the future, you should know that public schools do not have to accept non-public-school work for credit. This would be the case no matter which curriculum you used. Until the student begins earning credits (high school or sometimes middle school), schools will enroll a previously homeschooled student at the grade level that corresponds to their age. They still must enroll a high school student who otherwise meets residence and other enrollment requirements, but the student might be enrolled missing credits. Some high schools will allow a student to test to prove their homeschool credits, and a few states' homeschool laws specify that high schools must do this. Other states leave it up to the school to determine what they will accept, and it often comes down to the opinion of the specific individual you are speaking with at the school. Therefore, parents should think carefully about homeschooling a student who has reached high school level and make sure they are reasonably certain they intend for the student to graduate from the family’s home school.



    Quote Originally Posted by nova13442 View Post
    Also, how difficult is it to transfer to home school mid-year? We are about a month into our school year, so I don't think there would be any critical academic impacts, but wondering if anyone has any experiences they can share?
    Time4Learning held a live webinar awhile back about beginning to homeschool mid-year. It is available in recorded form on YouTube:

    <span id="docs-internal-guid-45710126-7fff-4284-75e9-5d7c353ca28e"><span style="background-color: transparent; color: rgb(33, 33, 33); font-family: Arial; font-size: 12pt; white-space: pre-wrap;">


    Finally, here is some important difference that explains the difference between using an online school and homeschooling:

    The Difference Between Online Schools and Homeschooling

    Many people mistakenly think of or refer to online schools as “homeschooling.” Homeschooling is not about the location where the learning takes place. It is about what laws must be followed and who is responsible for following them.

    When you enroll in an online school, the school is responsible for following the school laws (not homeschool laws) in the state where the school is located, plus any applicable national laws. The school will choose a curriculum, tell you how to use it, and impose a schedule. The school will create, maintain, sign, and stand behind any documents pertaining to your student’s education. The school will provide teachers for consultations and office personnel for records management. The school will arrange for any testing in accordance to laws for schools.

    When you homeschool, the parent is responsible for following the homeschool laws in the state where the student lives. (Each state has its own set of homeschool laws and they are all very different. Homeschool laws are also very different from the rules schools must follow.) The parent chooses a curriculum (Time4Learning is one curriculum you might choose), decides how they want to use it, and follows their own schedule. The parent creates, maintains, signs, and stands behind any documents pertaining to their student’s education. The parent is the “teacher of record”, even if using an online curriculum. (This is similar to a classroom teacher who might show their class a video or allow them to use a computer program. He or she is still the teacher.) The parent will arrange for any testing in accordance to the homeschool laws in their own state (which may be no testing, a portfolio review instead of testing, testing only every few years, or annual testing).

    A great place to find your state’s homeschool laws ishttps://a2zhomeschooling.com/laws/homeschool_laws_by_state_province_or_country/

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

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