Alphabet soup in London
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  1. #1
    terrioneale is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Alphabet soup in London

    Hello, I am Terri and I homeschool my 6 yo daughter Emily. She has epilepsy...that is official. We are also having her evaluated for ADHD and sensory processing disorder.

    Like many children with ADHD, I can't get her to sit still and focus on writing or reading, but she is addicted to anything on a screen (TV, iPad or laptop). So I thought that T4L might be perfect for her. We will start on Monday...new month and new curriculum.

  2. #2
    jpenn's Avatar
    jpenn is offline Senior Member
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    Welcome Terri and Emily! I think Emily will be able to focus with T4L due to the flash animation and interaction. Be sure to have her take frequent breaks. Try having her tell you a story that you write for her. Have her read it back to you. She may take more interest in writing when she actually sees her own story in print. Have her use a story starter for writing, tell a story into a recorder... just to get used to coming up with ideas. Use graphic organizers to help her organize her ideas. Keep in mind that a story for a 6 year old is not intense by any means... a few sentences to start with is acceptable. Have her start by drawing a picture first, then writing about it. A good book to use is "Draw, Then Write."

    Best wishes to you both!
    Joyfully,
    Jackie

  3. #3
    terrioneale is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    We have an hourglass egg timer set for ten minutes but it is hard to get her to make if half that long for written work. We shall see what computer work is like. And it is likely to vary day to day depending on how her seizures where at night.

    We have a fully fitted house with mini-trampoline, weights and chewy sticks. The SPD (sensory processing disorder) responds very well to simple exercises that help her focus. We also have a children's tent that has pillows in it, called her quiet room...she can go there (hopefully before she has a meltdown...otherwise I ask her to) and do just that...cool down.

    Thankfully, Emily is not my first child (number six in fact). It is taking everything I learned with my adult children to manage her...plus all I can read.

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