Anyone else think Science & Soc Studies is too hard???
Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    reb621's Avatar
    reb621 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    IN
    Posts
    51

    Default Anyone else think Science & Soc Studies is too hard???

    I know my 5th grader (11.10 yrs) isn't the most advanced with science and social studies/history and certainly HATES to read, but she is really struggling with the Science and Social Studies lessons at the 3RD GRADE LEVEL!

    I'm having to spend 45 min. per child each night just to RE-DO only ONE LESSON that they failed earlier in the day! Are my kids just that far behind, or is this curriculum just way too hard for special needs kids (developmentally delayed/ADHD/low average IQ)?!?!

    NOTE: If they miss questions like "Which is the dividend?," I just let those go. I don't care if they can name it as long as they can do the problems. It's the bigger, main idea questions that they're missing that I'm thinking are just way over their heads or something.

    Rebecca,
    Perplexed and Exhausted Mom

  2. #2
    mcmary is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    59

    Default

    Hi Rebecca,

    My daughter (grade 7) only uses T4L for language arts and social studies. She really likes it but the social studies quizzes require recall of a lot of very specific facts such as dates and names. What I have found to be very successful is that I sit with her during each lesson. We alternate reading the screens out loud and I'll ask her questions on each page. Examples are: "Summarize what this page said," "what does _________________ mean?," "what do you think is going to happen next?", "what did _____________ say about _________________?" These kinds of questions ensure that she is "getting it," making connections, building on prior knowledge, and making predictions. I've noticed that the quizzes are much easier now that we take the time to discuss the content. The information is sticking more. Plus, we take notes on names and dates because we know that the quizzes always includes those sort of questions. I know that this is very time consuming but it's a great way to learn. One of the major reasons that we decided to homeschool was because she processes more slowly and needs more time. One-on-one learning is ideal, and accomodations (such as reading material out loud to your child or scribing for them) are okay! If your daughter is quite delayed in reading/spelling/writing have you considered a separate literacy program such as Orton Gillingham? Verticy, for instance, offers a program designed for homeschoolers. My daughter had four years of NILD educational therapy (her main areas of delay were math and handwriting but also reading) and it made a WORLD of difference! I hope this helps-

    Mary

  3. #3
    reb621's Avatar
    reb621 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    IN
    Posts
    51

    Default

    Thanks for the suggestions, Mary. I think I'll have to rework our schedule so that these harder subjects are covered in the evening when Dad can entertain the other two. That way I can give her that required 1:1 time.

    Thanks, too, for the tip re: NILD therapy and the others. I wasn't familiar with any of those, so I'll definitely have to check them out.

    Rebecca

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •