Central Auditory Processing Disorder
Results 1 to 7 of 7
Like Tree4Likes
  • 2 Post By Delaware SpEd Teacher
  • 1 Post By monnalu
  • 1 Post By monnalu

Thread: Central Auditory Processing Disorder

  1. #1
    monnalu is offline Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    48

    Default Central Auditory Processing Disorder

    I was lurking on this board to see if there were any comments about those whose student has CAPD. I was amazed that there was none. I'm wondering how many of those children with ADHD actually have CAPD. My granddaughter exhibited signs of ADHD frequently and it was assumed that was why she had issues focusing. Medications were suggested, but my daughter refused to have her medicated. So we went in search of and discovered this uncommon disorder. Sure enough. Homeschooling my granddaughter with no background noises like TV or other children milling about the room has been effective. Homeschooling was frustrating at first because we did know what her problem was. Once we knew, I make her look at me when I give directions; she much repeat back to me what the directions are and what she understands them to mean; she must write down points she wants to cover in her writing; and she has handwriting practice everyday. She just completed 3rd grade and tested 3 grades higher. The correct diagnosis made all the difference for her. She has a very high IQ and understands many theoretical concepts.

  2. #2
    lovehmschlg's Avatar
    lovehmschlg is offline Forum Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    1,107

    Default

    Hi. Thanks for taking the time to write this post. My daughter hasn't been diagnosed with CAPD, but your suggestions are helpful to me and I'm sure it'll be for others as well.
    Janet
    enjoying homeschooling and learning with my kids, using T4L and T4W
    blogging our homeschool experiences at The Learning Hourglass


  3. #3
    Delaware SpEd Teacher is offline Junior Member Newbie
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    DE
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Have you read the new book "ADHD Does Not Exist"? The author, a medical doctor, makes a strong case that what is frequently called ADHD is usually another malady, like a hearing, vision, or neurological impairment. I am glad you got to the root cause of her learning disability!
    lovehmschlg and monnalu like this.

  4. #4
    msfournier67@hotmail.com is offline Junior Member Newbie
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1

    Default

    My son was diagnosed with High Functioning Autism (another neurologist called it "Aspergers"); ADD; CAPD and Sensory Integration with modulation dysfunction.

    I know my son was born with a cord wrapped around his neck two times that almost killed him as I was rushed in for an emergency C Section after a nurse argued with a doctor not to give me an enema, stating to her that my baby was dying.

    He looked normal at birth (physically) but a few months after he was born I knew something was wrong but I did not know what it was. At 18 months he was evaluated after a woman in my church advised me to do so.

    He did not talk until almost 5 years old. I pulled him out of school in May 2009, when only in the Second grade due to multiple suspensions and the teacher teaching him to read by memorization (big mistake!) and him failing to learn how to read, or anything else. I bought a book on how to teach him how to read (Why Johnny Can't Read...") and I bought "ClicknKid" computerized phonics game with 100 lessons. I also bought the Wizard of Oz series of books at a garage sale. I went through the phonics lessons (100 lessons) two times. I took the Wizard of Oz books and broke the words down by syllables (example: ab/ra/ca/dab/ra) I highlighted the sounds he learned in his phonics lessons. To make a long story short, what the school system could not accomplish I did. My son learned to read in less than 3 months and fluently in less than 6 months. I knew it was a crucial period because I read somewhere that if he did not learn to read by the 3rd grade the likelihood he would learn after that grade was very low. I thank God gave me the energy and wisdom to do for my son what the school system failed to do.

    I do not know whether any of those diagnosis have any real meaning as I learned that my son is intelligent and can learn. I learned many different strategies to help him as I needed to know how he learns (visually, kinesthetically, etc.) and I implemented the things I learned. I had my son with a homebound tutor last year (a prior special education teacher that was tutoring because she was retired) and he did not retain the little she taught him as she did not get up off her chair and implement other ways of teaching my son in his particular style. I have to say that he regressed some because of it but reminded me constantly of things that I had taught him. I am now considering whether I want to use time4learning again as it is the first homeschool software I began with when I put him back into the second grade.

    I did use another curriculum that was specialized for children with learning disabilities and it was shipped to my home and although it did teach me many strategies on teaching my son visually and in his learning style, I have to say that it was so much work and very frustrating as I could not get through the material because I was always on the phone with them trying to understand different things. That is why I am back at this site. It is now October 25, 2014 (when I write this), and my son has lost over 1/4 of his homebound tutoring because the North Syracuse Central School District (in upstate NY) only wants to give him 2 hours a day of homebound tutoring even though typical children with no disabilities get the same time. My son took a NY State test in English and Math that shows he is on Level 1 (way below his grade level) and even though the School District is aware of his pronounced issues, they refused to give him more than 2 hours of tutoring. I have filed a Civil Rights Complaint but am not holding my breath. I think it is better to just homeschool your child then FIGHT a corrupt School District who fails at teaching the kids with Special Needs out of just plain laziness and/or because they refuse to change their policies in order to save the "tax dollars" they receive which they funnel into other school programs instead of Special Education even though I have also paid my school taxes and my son should benefit from it but hasn't.

    I am going to try this curriculum now as it is better than receiving nothing from North Syracuse Central School District. I am so angry at them for failing to provide my son with a Free Appropriate Public Education but I hope this curriculum works for him! Well, wish me luck!

    M.F.

  5. #5
    monnalu is offline Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    48

    Default

    Bit of an update to my original post. My granddaughter completed all the 4th grade work by the week before Christmas. We had a little ceremony promoting her to the 5th grade. We have had many issues about writing--it is very difficult for her as her hands just get exhaused. Also, her writing looks like that of a 5 or 6 year old. We just discovered she has dysgraphia in addition to CAPD so that has been why it was a problem--she would do anything rather than write out by hand. She has taken a keyboarding course and learned to type so she can do the majority of the "written" work on the computer. I set up a OneNote notebook for her with pages for each topic in each subject. She helped me set it up so it would work with her style of completing her work.

    We will start back to school tomorrow in the 5th grade and see how she does with the OneNote. For those who do not have Microsoft Office, I am told you can use the online version for free--I have not verified this, but it worth checking out. I love OneNote because you can copy and paste directly from other documents and from the internet. It is a very easy program to use--that is how I organized all my lesson plans and lectures when I was teaching nursing classes. Everything is in one spot. I will you know how it goes.

    My granddaughter is so very bright and I am so thankful we discovered what was causing her issues. She is also learning to program her computer with Linus and to troubleshoot her hardware. She also studies Latin and hopes to start French next year.

  6. #6
    monnalu is offline Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    48

    Default

    Janet, I hope your daughter is doing well. Understanding the problem makes such a difference in how we approach teaching.
    Last edited by monnalu; 01-05-2015 at 05:05 PM. Reason: Left off a person's name
    lovehmschlg likes this.

  7. #7
    monnalu is offline Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    48

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Delaware SpEd Teacher View Post
    Have you read the new book "ADHD Does Not Exist"? The author, a medical doctor, makes a strong case that what is frequently called ADHD is usually another malady, like a hearing, vision, or neurological impairment. I am glad you got to the root cause of her learning disability!
    I have contended for decades that ADHD is something educators made up (and other adults) because they didn't want to take the time to analyze why children caused problems and had difficulty being in a classroom. Sometimes, it is something as simple as dyslexia (not that is simple, but it is single problem) or as complex as emotional problems. It was just easier to medicate the children into submission and quiet. Both of my children and grandchildren were labeled ADHD in primary grades. My son (now 44) has Asberger's, my daughter was just bored to death, my grandson wanted to spend more time on certain subjects and was not willing to go on with the teachers; plan (he was homeschooled until junior high), and then my granddaughter with CAPD and dysgraphia. None of them needed medicating.
    lovehmschlg likes this.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •