Central Auditory Processing Issues
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  1. #1
    Asiasmom is offline Junior Member
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    Smile Central Auditory Processing Issues

    My daughter is 7. She has Central Auditory Processing Issues. She also has ADD. She has always had issues with reading and writing. I have always homeschooled her. I have recently felt as though I was failing her somehow because she is not independent yet in reading and writing. She doesn't spell things independently such as letters to friends, or cards to relatives. She won't read independently. We recently had a friend of hers over, and he read a book to us. He is the same age as her. It was apparent to her that he was so much better at reading than her. It really hurt her. I don't know what to do to help her. I know T4L will be good for her. She is working at the 1st grade level. She really excels at T4L. She loves it so far. We have only been working at T4L for 3 days. She already has been asking for it. I worry about her writing skills too. I know I shouldn't worry so much, but I guess it is the mother in me.

  2. #2
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    jpenn is offline Senior Member
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    Hello Asiasmom,

    Take a deep breath and relax. Asia is going to be just fine. Seven is so very young. Kids that age are still learning "how" to read and write.

    My DD (now 14) has ADHD and CAPD so I can identify with you. I thought she would never learn to read, no really, I was scared she would be functionally illiterate. Reading only kicked in last year. I did everything in my power to help her and actually, life just happened and she bloomed when she was ready!! She finally found books she was interested in reading. Her reading isn't perfect, but she reads,enjoys it, and most of all, she comprehends it. I've also spent time fretting about her lack of writing skills. Silly Mom for sure. She is writing this year and I've been impressed with her way with words. Now, don't get me wrong, she isn't a journalist at all and her spelling is terrible (she also has dyslexia), but those things can be fixed easily. She can flow in her writing and most of all, she is enjoying it which speaks volumes to this Momma.

    All this to say, your sweet Asia will be just fine as time goes on. You will gently work on areas of need and praise her strengths. Find a book she really loves and read it to her (a short book she will be able to remember) over and over. Then you read a sentence and let her read a sentence. Eventually, you read a paragraph and let her read a paragraph. Before long, she will be reading the whole book by herself. Invite the little boy over again and celebrate as she reads the book to everyone. Another thing that can help, is shoulder reading. Sit behind her slightly with the book in front of the two of you. Read softly (loud enough for her to hear you easily) and have her keep up with you. It will prompt her. You will always be just a hair ahead of her.
    Joyfully,
    Jackie

  3. #3
    Bommy2 is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    I agree. Take a deep and relaxing couple of breaths. It will be ok. CAPD is a very stressful disorder to work with. T4L has helped us alot. Over the last few years I got a "library" full of books for my son to read in hopes that one day he would learn to read and then love to read. It has been a long and at times frustrating road however, we made it!!! He is now a bookworm. Maybe not perfect at all times but oh so much improved that he is fluent. He has a cousin that read fluently early on and it had him so frustrated and hurt because he knew that he wasn't nearly as good. However, I told him we all have our strengths and weaknesses. Turns out that his cousin is bad at math and hates it. Well, my son loves it and is good at it.

    My son hated yes hated learning his sight words. So, we made a game out of it which took the tension away from having to learn and made it a bit more fun for him. The other thing that I learned to do with him that made him proud was: 1. Got a notebook and decorated it the way he wanted. 2. Filled that notebook with books he would "checkout" of his own library. 3. Took smiley face stickers and put them on the side of books or lower edge of cover for different grade levels of reading.

    We started with alot of Step into Reading and other level books that were easy. Also, I would read alot to him and then go back a few hours later and have him "help" me read the story again. Slowly he gained his confidence. Although there were days when he would get stuck on even easy words.

    As far as writing goes...that will come along. It might be slower. My son used to say that he hated making the letters the way he was "supposed to". I found that by getting wipeoff boards and wipeoff books we could practice over and over. I let him "rest" with making letters for a while and then went back to it. Now, it is much better. Have you tried hand over hand when helping your daughter make the letters? I have had to do that with my other son that has autism. Both boys have had fine motor problems in the past. Now, after much trial and error we are turning a corner. The other thing I found that is really good for writing is.....not sure exactly what they are called but they fit onto your pencil, twist pencil or even on markers. They have indentations where the fingers go. Oh yes, one more thing. We have tried all different types of utensils to write with some mentioned above.

    Don't worry mom it's ok. It will be stressful at times. It will have bright moments sometimes. We can all related here. Hope some of what I said helps.

    Cheryl

  4. #4
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    Mamasaurus is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    My 9 year old daughter has Aspergers & auditory processing. She struggled with reading until this past summer - now she's up to grade level her writing is still at 1st grade level, but focusing on that at home was effecting other tasks & our relationship, so I hired a tutor at the YMCA for help every other week. I also gave her a free email account, which I have the password to, that she can type to family/friends with. Typing has made her writing better even if the spelling is still inventive

  5. #5
    jpenn's Avatar
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    Great to hear about your successes, Mamasaurus!

    Here is a link for fun keyboarding games. It is a sister site for T4L, and it is a free to use. Hopefully you DD will have fun as she practices her keyboarding skills.
    Joyfully,
    Jackie

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