dictionary & ASD
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Thread: dictionary & ASD

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    Jennifer Mookie Nichols is offline Junior Member
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    Default dictionary & ASD

    My 7 yr hasn't been diagnosed yet but it is suspected she has ASD. I was surprised last week that she struggled with learning to use a dictionary. She is very proficient in reading & comprehension at 4th grade reading level. So I'm wondering why the dictionary is so difficult for her to understand. Suggestions?

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    monnalu is offline Member
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    I can't address the dictionary issue, but my 43 year old son has ASD. He is brilliant, but as a child, simple arithmetic made no sense to him. He was 12 before he could actually multiply and divide and understand what was happening to those number concepts. We did not know at the time what his problem was, but today he is a college graduate in computer programming. So obviously, he finally got the theory of mathematics. He does calculus as entertainment. Just be patient and know that she will eventually find the connection that makes it real for her. It will be a journey. Good luck and blessings on you and your daughter.

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    Jennifer Mookie Nichols is offline Junior Member
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    Thank you for your kind reply. You also addressed another issue we were having with learning to tell time. I am being patient for I feel that it just hasn't "clicked" for her yet.

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    Ruth_Lanton's Avatar
    Ruth_Lanton is offline Member
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    Does she HAVE TO use a dictionary for anything? I agree it's a good skill to have, but it's not nearly as essential now as it was when I was a child. Most of the time, if I want to look up a word, it's faster and easier to google it, or go directly to dictionary.com and type in the word.

    7 is still very young. I was a "typical learner" and wasn't using a big dictionary at that age- just glossaries in the back of my reading workbooks. Those had fewer words, bigger text, and much simpler definitions.
    Ruth, single mom to Jack, 13, Hannah, 19, and Leah, 20.

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    lovehmschlg's Avatar
    lovehmschlg is offline Forum Moderator
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    Hi, Jennifer.
    Could it be that she doesn't know 'alphabetical order'? Could that be why the dictionary is difficult to understand? Not sure if it's more than that. If it's more than that, then I would use Google "How to use a dictionary". I came up with a lot of information. I would start with getting her a simple children's dictionary and explain what the different entries are.

    My daughter has Down syndrome. She's 17 and at a 4th grade level in LA, and 1st grade Math. She also does not know how to use a dictionary, but it's because she hasn't mastered 'alphabetical order' yet. Like Ruth mentioned, there are more important things that I'm focusing on. But at some point, I do want to address that again.

    As for telling time, that has been another struggle. I've managed to teach her how to tell time by starting with the hour, then half hour and then 15 minute increments. She can tell time now. But she cannot do math with time. Like it's 7:15 now and we'll be leaving in 30 minutes. We need to work on that. She will need that in life skills.
    Janet
    enjoying homeschooling and learning with my kids, using T4L and T4W
    blogging our homeschool experiences at The Learning Hourglass


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