Down syndrome
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Thread: Down syndrome

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    Hmschlg3 is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Down syndrome

    We are fairly new to T4L. Our daughter with DS is 11 years old. We are really struggling with basic math concepts. If anyone has any ideas, please share. How many using T4L have a child(ren) with DS using this program and what do you like or don't like about T4L. Any suggestions you share will be most helpful and greatly appreciated.
    thanks.
    Janet in Florida

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    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Default Re: Down syndrome

    Hi, Janet. My son has Down syndrome, so I wanted to welcome you. He's only four, so our "math" so far consists of getting him past the point where he realizes there's "one" or "more than one" of something.

    I have been reading "Teaching Math to People With Down Syndrome", which is available from Woodbine House. They also sell some hands-on math kits designed specifically for people with DS.

    A friend recommended "Teach Your Baby Math". It's intended for infants, but I see where a lot of the ideas would work really well for an individual with DS. My friend's daughter is thirteen and is doing great academically. She has always been homeschooled.

    Have you seen this page, about Time4Learning and Down syndrome?

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

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    MamaMary is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Down syndrome

    Welcome Janet! I am so glad to "meet" you I do not have a son with DS, but I do have three boys with APD and we live in Florida so I had to just give you a big welcome (((Hug))) I think Kel did a GREAT job giving you info for DS and I love her book suggestion. I just wanted to tell you that for my boys with processing disorders they went from struggling with math concepts to mastering them and scoring higher than any other year we've homeschooled. (we've been HS'ing since 98') The strong interactive graphics really pull their attention and the graphics add velcro to the information so it STICKS and STAYS in the brain!

    I look forward to getting to know you better,
    Mary (Big Warm Welcome Smile)

    PS- Where in Florida are you? (West Coast, East Coast, South, North Central) We are in Pinellas County.
    Mary, Child of the King of Kings, Jesus Christ! Wife to best friend and Mama to her four boys 91, 96, 00, 02, Homeschooling since 1998! Come visit us on our blog! http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/MamaMary/

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    thequeen is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Re: Down syndrome

    Quote Originally Posted by Hmschlg3
    We are fairly new to T4L. Our daughter with DS is 11 years old. We are really struggling with basic math concepts. If anyone has any ideas, please share. How many using T4L have a child(ren) with DS using this program and what do you like or don't like about T4L. Any suggestions you share will be most helpful and greatly appreciated.
    thanks.
    Janet in Florida

    my granddaughter is 14 and beautiful; she is at a 3 or 4 year old level; was in public school and contained until she came to be with me; i put her in public school and she was mainstreamed and hated it; her first class was spanish, go figure; the final straw was when she came home all dirty and said somebody was mean. i pulled her that day. i need a lot of help. she did real well with kindergarten but we have really stalled with first grade. in theory she is in 8th but i didn't know where to start so we started at kindergarten and she aced everything. but now that we are in first grade she doesn't like doing it any more; any suggestions?

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    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Down syndrome

    Is the first grade level too difficult, or does she just not like it? My friend's 18-year-old son with DS went through the kindergarten level several times, because he just wasn't ready for first grade, yet. The lessons can be done as many times as necessary.

    Also, she might respond well to the first and second grade social studies and science lessons, even if the first and second grade language and math are a bit too much.

    Would the preschool level be too easy for her? Besides songs, videos, and stories that are read aloud to the student, the preschool level has activities like dragging pictures of objects to a shadow of the same shape, deciding what object comes next in a pattern (moon, sun, star, moon, sun, ___), clicking on an object when told to find it ("Find the screwdriver" after listening to a book about tools), answering simple questions about a story she just heard, and some online coloring. The units are arranged according to topic, such as "The Zoo", "Space", "Food", and so forth. You could check out library books or find videos to go along with them to make the program a bit more "grown up" for her.

    See and Learn has some excellent, FREE printable things designed specifically for students with Down syndrome. So far, all that's finished is the Language curriculum, but it's terrific. The only thing is that it's based in the UK, so you end up with a few vocabulary differences, i.e. calling a "cookie" a "biscuit" and saying "Mum" instead of "Mom". They do have an American version available for purchase. I purchased the American version, because I didn't want to spend a lot of time printing and laminating the free materials, especially when I would need to tweak some of the language anyway. The American version is not available for printing.

    There are some Yahoo lists for parents who are homeschooling children with Down syndrome.

    For math, I have purchased Numicon . . . again, from the UK. If you go on YouTube and search Numicon, you can watch some videos that show how the program works. It's made up of "plastic stuff to play with" instead of worksheets, so it's pretty appealing. They have a special, very expensive kit for special needs, but I would recommend getting the regular kit for preschool, unless she can already add and subtract single digits easily. The kit is called First Steps at Home or something like that and it's in the neighborhood of thirty dollars for a lot of material and a guide book. The kit for special needs is actually pretty advanced, and it costs a couple hundred dollars.

    Go to the Woodbine House site and order some of their books like Teaching Reading to Children with Down Syndrome. You'll find some excellent resources there.

    This is my passion these days, so I could go on and on.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

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