Homeschooling 13 yro w/ Asperger's, dyslexia - Not reading, hates writing - Any tips?
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Thread: Homeschooling 13 yro w/ Asperger's, dyslexia - Not reading, hates writing - Any tips?

  1. #1
    TwiMom is offline Junior Member
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    Question Homeschooling 13 yro w/ Asperger's, dyslexia - Not reading, hates writing - Any tips?

    Hi, we are beginning T4L again, only done the free trail, really liked, just didn't have the funds to continue, but now we are back and ready to get started this week.

    My son is 13 w/Asperger's Syndrome and dyslexia, also has motor skills issues that contribute to hating writing. He is NOT a reader, loves books, just can't read them. He can read some words, but it is rough to read like a whole paragraph or most kiddy books. He don't like reading books meant for pre-k to like 2nd grade, they are either not interesting or he just thinks they are too babyish.

    He was/is doing tutoring once a month, but the guy doing it does everything with poetry, my son is not a poetry person. So the tutor told me this week in an e-mail to try Current Events. Have him to read an article in the paper (or I can read it to him) and he is to tell me what he thinks and should write it down. Going to give it a try.

    Any other tips? I know that I will have to sit with him throughout the time he is working on T4L because of the reading, but what else can I do?

    He will be doing some 1st and 2nd grade LA and Math to start just to see where he is and then move up from there. I know that sounds bad, but his disabilities have really held him back and we did not find out anything until he was 8.5. I knew that he was not learning the way he should have been in Pre-K and throughout his elementary years, but we could not get any help then. He does middle and high school science and history with my help.
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    lovehmschlg is offline Forum Moderator
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    Hi, TwiMom.
    First, let me welcome you back to Time4Learning.

    I can give you a few suggestions for the reading that I used with my daughter. Before my daughter learned to read fluently, we borrowed lots of audiobooks from the library. She would listen to them at home or whenever we were in the car. I also tried to read with her at least once a day, usually more. Even if it's only for 10 minutes. Several sessions of 10-minute reading are sooo helpful. I would also do buddy-reading with her. I would let her read the words she knew. Then we moved to sentences and then a page for her and a page for me.

    I found a wonderful book called "Reading Reflex" that taught me how to teach her to read. This is a review I found on it that expresses how I feel about this reading program. Between Reading Reflex and Time4Learning, my daughter learned to read within 6 months. And now she LOVES to read. By the way, she was 9 years old when I found this book and she learned to read. The Phono-Graphix method taught in the Reading Reflex book helps a child with special needs learn to de-code words without having to learn rules, like 'i' before 'e', etcetera. Time4Learning has helped her tremendously with comprehension and reading fluency.

    Oh, also, I found a reading therapist/tutor who uses the Phono-Graphix method. The book has a link for that. But may I suggest that it's so important to find a reading tutor that is a good match for your child. You could possible ask at your local library, local school or even a college student who is studying to be a teacher.

    I hope that helps.
    Last edited by lovehmschlg; 03-09-2015 at 12:52 PM.
    TwiMom and missmcneal1 like this.
    Janet
    enjoying homeschooling and learning with my kids, using T4L and T4W
    blogging our homeschool experiences at The Learning Hourglass


  3. #3
    TwiMom is offline Junior Member
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    Thank you lovehmschlg. I have seen that book a few times and wondered. I think it might be time to check it out closer. Thank you

    We have done audio books since my son was very young. We have had to make a list of what audio books we would like for our library to order. They got a bunch of new audios last year for the kids and teens sections, he listened to all the ones that were of interest to him in a matter or a few weeks. He still checks them out ever so often to listen to again and again and again. LOL

    It's just finding the right audio books for him. Our library (the whole system, 4 libraries in all) seem to cater more toward the girls, so that make it harder. We have 2 other libraries that we can "shop" at that aren't too far away, but again, they tend to cater toward the girls more.

    The online reading program that is his doing, Dynaread, is a great program and he did just READ with minimal help 5 lessons worth of paragraphs, but when I asked what they were about, he couldn't tell me, that is when he said he hears and sees it, but he don't get it.

    As far as a tutor goes, he is with one now, but he is geared more toward poetry and my son just can't wrap his brain around poetry. LOL So he suggested that we do Current Events. That worked well yesterday because it was something he was interested in, animals.
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  4. #4
    lovehmschlg's Avatar
    lovehmschlg is offline Forum Moderator
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    So it's the comprehension he's struggling with a bit. I think it's a good idea to read things that interest him. The tutor may be on to something there. If it's current events, then that's great. If you Google 'current events for kids' you'll find some great links online. We've subscribed to Time For Kids. My kids really enjoy that one. Also, God's World News for Kids. And like I mentioned in my earlier post, Time4Learning has helped my daughter tremendously with reading comprehension. Also, repetition is a huge benefit. She'll repeat lessons or re-read books. It really helps her to understand it better the second and third time. Of course, when I read with her, I'll also ask her questions and explain portions to her. We stop and talk about what just happened and what she thinks may happen next.

    Oh, I also wanted to mention some audio books we've purchased that my kids have enjoyed and are an excellent addition to our library. We purchased them from Lamplighter at a homeschool convention. I've added a link there for you.
    missmcneal1 likes this.
    Janet
    enjoying homeschooling and learning with my kids, using T4L and T4W
    blogging our homeschool experiences at The Learning Hourglass


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