How do I get him to follow through on work.
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Thread: How do I get him to follow through on work.

  1. #1
    renebward is offline Junior Member
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    Question How do I get him to follow through on work.

    After too many years of frustration dealing with the public school system regarding my 10 year old autistic son's IEP, I decided to try homeschooling, even though I work full time. We started mid year, but I started him at the beginning of 5th grade. He has already done more work in the past 2 months than he would ever actually get done at public school. The problem I am facing is getting him to actually follow through with each lesson. After 5 or 6 tasks he is ready to hang it up for the day. I'm afraid he won't get to the end of the 5th grade lessons before I have to send in proof of progress. I know that he is going to work at a slower pace due to his autism, but I want to offer him all of the help I can.
    If the subject is boring to him, he wants to move on to something else. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to motivate him to complete more tasks? I know it is partially me, because I am new to homeschooling. I guess my question is really, Is it ok to let him work at his own pace, or should I be pushing for more?

  2. #2
    lovehmschlg's Avatar
    lovehmschlg is offline Forum Moderator
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    Hi renebward,

    I would say that it is absolutely okay to let him work at his own pace. Maybe he only needs a break between lessons. Could you do something physical or some hands-on learning for a few minutes or even an hour before getting back to complete another lesson or two? What motivates him? Each child is different. My daughter loves to sing. She loves her T4L lessons...but if she needed motivation, I'd tell her she can play her x-box singing game if she completes 2 lessons.

    My daughter has Down syndrome. Although she is high functioning and works for long periods of time on lessons, her retention is not good. So she may not get through a whole grade level in one year. She needs to repeat lessons, especially in math, before she is ready to move on to a new concept. She still shows progress at the end of the school year. Her progress is just not as great as a typical child. But it's definitely progress.

    There are times that a particular subject is boring to her. When this happens, it's usually because it's hard to understand or too much reading. So I may sit with her and help her through it. If she's bored because it's too easy, though, we move to another lesson or another grade level. (we have access to a grade level up and a grade level down) I also look for other things to supplement whatever the lesson covers. We go to the library or look up videos online, on YouTube or on Netflix. Pinterest is another source that I go to for hands-on activities. It may help you to go into your parent administration page and look at his Lesson Plans under the Parent Tools tab to get more details on what his lessons are covering. This can help you find something to supplement in these cases where he is getting bored.

    I hope that helps! I hope others chime in too.
    Last edited by lovehmschlg; 01-07-2016 at 02:09 PM.
    Janet
    enjoying homeschooling and learning with my kids, using T4L and T4W
    blogging our homeschool experiences at The Learning Hourglass


  3. #3
    DaisyKnollAcademy is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    I had the same question. We struggle with that here too. My son gets wiggly or frustrated and we have to take breaks. Sometimes I have to click the mouse for him, as long as I know he is understanding the information. I am still not sure if he will stay at grade level or will be working at a slower pace. The older he is getting, the gap seems to be increasing.

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    lovehmschlg's Avatar
    lovehmschlg is offline Forum Moderator
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    Same here, DaisyKnollAcademy. Although my daughter is showing progress each year and she is reading very well, as her peers continue to grow, mature and move ahead, the gap is growing greater. And not just academically. So I'm learning to not compare her to other kids. I have to meet her where she is and help her to learn at her level. Any achievement or progress is celebrated!!
    I do help her a lot more than I did my other kids. My other kids got to a point where they could work independently most of the time. My daughter with special needs does need my help a lot. She does work independently at times, but with new material or concepts, she usually requires much guidance.
    Janet
    enjoying homeschooling and learning with my kids, using T4L and T4W
    blogging our homeschool experiences at The Learning Hourglass


  5. #5
    andreharris8205 is offline Junior Member
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    I have a fourteen year old, with a very mild form of Asperger's. He gets bored very easily, but he finds school to be completely useless and doesn't understand why he needs it. I have tried taking things away, and he simply does not care. He has completed work but it is rushed and I can tell he is not watching the lessons. I am also faced with the fact that he is a huge kid, and he gets very defiant. If pushed too far he will just simply shut down and cry inconsolably, and apologize for his behavior. He's a smart kid, and I don't want to lose him now that we finally know why he has struggled so much all of these years. This Mr. Mom has tried tough love, grounding, telling him I could be fined and/or go to jail for his truancy. He tells me he understands the seriousness of our situation, but I don't think he really does? His anxiety was so bad that he only attended three days of public school, and now more than half way through the school year. Like one of the other parents mentioned, he has actually completed more work since we started Home schooling, but it is not quality work. If I sit with with him, he becomes very anxious and usually tells me he wants to work alone. Problem is, he won't stay on task....hence my dilemma. Any suggestions?

  6. #6
    lovehmschlg's Avatar
    lovehmschlg is offline Forum Moderator
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    I can't think of any advice that might help, but while I was reading your post, Andre, I thought of a friend and her son.
    I have a good friend who has a 16-yo son with Asperger's. She does most of his work with him. It works great for them. But the reason I think it works great for them is that mom loves learning with him. She gets excited about the stuff they're learning. She often tells me about the book they are presently reading and how much they are both enjoying it and the discussions they have over what they're learning. So I guess her excitement rubs off on him.

    So I would just say to try to find ways to make some of his lessons more interesting by adding some hands-on activities to it or finding a youtube video or educational movie at the library to add to what he's learning. For example, of it's a lesson on atoms, go to Pinterest.com and find a model you can make together.

    I hope someone else can chime in here with some other ideas or suggestions from personal experience.
    Janet
    enjoying homeschooling and learning with my kids, using T4L and T4W
    blogging our homeschool experiences at The Learning Hourglass


  7. #7
    karenkevin16 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by andreharris8205 View Post
    I have a fourteen year old, with a very mild form of Asperger's. He gets bored very easily, but he finds school to be completely useless and doesn't understand why he needs it. I have tried taking things away, and he simply does not care. He has completed work but it is rushed and I can tell he is not watching the lessons. I am also faced with the fact that he is a huge kid, and he gets very defiant. If pushed too far he will just simply shut down and cry inconsolably, and apologize for his behavior. He's a smart kid, and I don't want to lose him now that we finally know why he has struggled so much all of these years. This Mr. Mom has tried tough love, grounding, telling him I could be fined and/or go to jail for his truancy. He tells me he understands the seriousness of our situation, but I don't think he really does? His anxiety was so bad that he only attended three days of public school, and now more than half way through the school year. Like one of the other parents mentioned, he has actually completed more work since we started Home schooling, but it is not quality work. If I sit with with him, he becomes very anxious and usually tells me he wants to work alone. Problem is, he won't stay on task....hence my dilemma. Any suggestions?
    I have to say first that I have no experience with this personally & am sorry you guys are struggling with this. Just an idea - what about making his school work his "job". I'm not suggesting paying him but explain to him that everybody has a job. The grownups make the money & take care of the kids. The kids' job is to go to school to learn. If grownups don't do their job they can't take care of their family, if kids don't do their job thet don't learn what they need to be productive adults. I'm not sure that made sense.
    pblanton likes this.

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