Life Skills vs. Academic Learning
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Thread: Life Skills vs. Academic Learning

  1. #1
    amwilson is offline Junior Member
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    Default Life Skills vs. Academic Learning

    I'm encountering some problems with concepts in Math with our girlie (13 with PDD/NOS). The curriculum is going through fractions. Frankly, I don't think she's going to grasp them, nor ever really need them. My question to those who have gone through the same things with your own special kids...how did you handle it from the lesson plans standpoint? I have her in the 2nd grade level for Math. She's doing fine with the majority of items, but I know there will be some she just will never get.

    Thanks for any help you can give!

    In Christ,
    Allison Wilson

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    Ruth_Lanton is offline Member
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    I'm not familiar with your daughter's specific diagnoses, but I have worked with kids learning 2nd grade math before. I would try to do as much "hands on math manipulatives" as possible, in addition to the coursework.

    Fractions are useful in baking- especially if you're making a bigger or smaller amount than the recipe calls for. I also remember a classroom activity (when I was a child) that involved numerous different sized measuring cups (including things like empty half-pint milk cartons and 12 ounce soda bottles) and lots of water being poured back and forth. It made the whole idea of fractions much more concrete- at least for addition and subtraction.

    I'm not quite sure how to do multiplication and division of fractions in a concrete way (though I'm sure I could figure it out if I spent some time playing with math manipulatives.)
    Ruth, single mom to Jack, 13, Hannah, 19, and Leah, 20.

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    lovehmschlg's Avatar
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    Hi, Allison.

    My daughter is 17 and has Down syndrome. She's also doing 2nd grade math. She's done some of the fractions you're speaking of. There have been times when I've thought she would never get something, and she amazes me. I have two suggestions. If she's not getting it and it's frustrating her, you may be right that she will never get it or that she may just not be ready for it. You can skip those lessons and maybe come back to them at a later time.
    My other suggestion is to try supplementing with some hands-on activities, some extra worksheets and/or some hands-on activities. Time4Learning does a great job at explaining the concept in different ways, but sometimes my daughter just needs more practice and different ways of doing it. So I'll search the internet for stuff to supplement the concept she's learning. I like Pinterest.com for creative ideas.

    As for needing fractions, she may need to know just the basics of fractions, without having to learn to add, multiply and so on. I think she will need them at some point, especially for life skills. Something as simple as half and quarter. You can use a pizza pie, apple or even money. For example, teach her that $1 is the same as 4 quarters. Draw a square with 4 boxes and place a quarter in each box. Show her that if you buy something for a quarter (take the quarter away), you are using "1/4 of a dollar" (write it out). I'd also take away the quarters and color in 1/4 of the box. Now you're teaching her money and fractions.

    That's just an idea. You can do the same with a clock as you teach her to tell time. I hope this helps. My main objective with my daughter with special needs is life skills, but I also want to challenge her to learn as much as she can. Time4Learning does this. Like I said earlier, she has pleasantly surprised me.
    Janet
    enjoying homeschooling and learning with my kids, using T4L and T4W
    blogging our homeschool experiences at The Learning Hourglass


  4. #4
    marshmellows is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Quote Originally Posted by lovehmschlg3 View Post
    Hi, Allison.

    My daughter is 17 and has Down syndrome. She's also doing 2nd grade math. She's done some of the fractions you're speaking of. There have been times when I've thought she would never get something, and she amazes me. I have two suggestions. If she's not getting it and it's frustrating her, you may be right that she will never get it or that she may just not be ready for it. You can skip those lessons and maybe come back to them at a later time.
    My other suggestion is to try supplementing with some hands-on activities, some extra worksheets and/or some hands-on activities. Time4Learning does a great job at explaining the concept in different ways, but sometimes my daughter just needs more practice and different ways of doing it. So I'll search the internet for stuff to supplement the concept she's learning. I like Pinterest.com for creative ideas.

    As for needing fractions, she may need to know just the basics of fractions, without having to learn to add, multiply and so on. I think she will need them at some point, especially for life skills. Something as simple as half and quarter. You can use a pizza pie, apple or even money. For example, teach her that $1 is the same as 4 quarters. Draw a square with 4 boxes and place a quarter in each box. Show her that if you buy something for a quarter (take the quarter away), you are using "1/4 of a dollar" (write it out). I'd also take away the quarters and color in 1/4 of the box. Now you're teaching her money and fractions.

    That's just an idea. You can do the same with a clock as you teach her to tell time. I hope this helps. My main objective with my daughter with special needs is life skills, but I also want to challenge her to learn as much as she can. Time4Learning does this. Like I said earlier, she has pleasantly surprised me.
    Allison,

    Those were just wonderful ideas there. Thanks for sharing them with all of us
    lovehmschlg likes this.

  5. #5
    specialkidsspecialhugs is offline Junior Member
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    Smile Hi Janet,

    Hi, Janet,
    I was reading some posts and discovered your post and found some very common threads among the two of us. Actually, just looking for support I guess! I have a 17 year old daughter also, She is the love of our family, She really is. I had a doctor tell me once that she would never talk and that most parents put children with her capabilities into homes. Needless to say I don't have that physician anymore! Anyway she is mentally challenged and has a few little noticed physical conditions. But I have her reading at a 1st grade level I believe in a large part due to t4l. I have spent a lot of money on various software for her. She responds quite well to computer programs that keep her engaged. I also have a friend that has a school for special needs and she gives me programs and tips. But anyway I thought I would just send a shoutout your way. How is your daughter progressing? I don't believe my daughter can go much further but like you say she constantly surprises us. and besides life should always involve further learning for any individual no matter what the circumstances. and new life experiences. Hope to hear a response from you.
    Donna









    Hi, Allison.

    My daughter is 17 and has Down syndrome. She's also doing 2nd grade math. She's done some of the fractions you're speaking of. There have been times when I've thought she would never get something, and she amazes me. I have two suggestions. If she's not getting it and it's frustrating her, you may be right that she will never get it or that she may just not be ready for it. You can skip those lessons and maybe come back to them at a later time.
    My other suggestion is to try supplementing with some hands-on activities, some extra worksheets and/or some hands-on activities. Time4Learning does a great job at explaining the concept in different ways, but sometimes my daughter just needs more practice and different ways of doing it. So I'll search the internet for stuff to supplement the concept she's learning. I like Pinterest.com for creative ideas.

    As for needing fractions, she may need to know just the basics of fractions, without having to learn to add, multiply and so on. I think she will need them at some point, especially for life skills. Something as simple as half and quarter. You can use a pizza pie, apple or even money. For example, teach her that $1 is the same as 4 quarters. Draw a square with 4 boxes and place a quarter in each box. Show her that if you buy something for a quarter (take the quarter away), you are using "1/4 of a dollar" (write it out). I'd also take away the quarters and color in 1/4 of the box. Now you're teaching her money and fractions.

    That's just an idea. You can do the same with a clock as you teach her to tell time. I hope this helps. My main objective with my daughter with special needs is life skills, but I also want to challenge her to learn as much as she can. Time4Learning does this. Like I said earlier, she has pleasantly surprised me. [/QUOTE]

  6. #6
    amwilson is offline Junior Member
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    Hi, Donna! Thanks for sharing!!! What a blessing that you've seen growth in your girlie! I'm already seeing some improvement in our daughter since starting t4l. It's wonderful to see considering how little she progressed in these same areas in public school. The extra time spent on just her is making a difference! Praying for your daughter and you!

  7. #7
    lovehmschlg's Avatar
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    Hi, Donna.

    It sounds like your daughter is doing well. In my opinion, I think my daughter is doing better than she would if I'd put her in school. I know it's a subjective statement, but the one on one attention she gets at home is best for her. Also, I hear of the aggravation some of my friends are going through with IEPs. I'm glad we don't need to deal with that.
    It's great that you have a friend who gives you programs and tips. I know I welcome any help I can get.

    I see you live in Florida, as well. We live in South Florida, near Fort Lauderdale. And you? My daughter met a girl at the homeschool convention in Orlando a couple of years ago, and they still keep in touch. Last year when we went back for the convention, they hung out the whole weekend. We were up there least weekend for a concert at Universal Studios, and she went with us. She also has a friend or two here locally, one with Down syndrome and another with a little bit of a learning challenge. And I have her in a couple of activities with other homeschoolers. How about your daughter? How is she doing as far as socially, with friends? I hate to use the 'socialization' question. It's never a problem with my other kids. But with kids with special needs, it could be a little bit of an issue....but it is whether they're in school or not, I think.

    How is my daughter progressing? Sometimes it seems slow. Other times she amazes me. I think she's still progressing, though. I write about it in a blog. I write about our homeschool. jThere are some things I've found that have been so helpful for our daughter, and I just want to share about it with other families who are in the same boat as we are. You can find the link below my signature. You can reach me through there, too, if you want to share tips.
    Last edited by lovehmschlg; 09-15-2014 at 02:10 PM.
    Janet
    enjoying homeschooling and learning with my kids, using T4L and T4W
    blogging our homeschool experiences at The Learning Hourglass


  8. #8
    specialkidsspecialhugs is offline Junior Member
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    Hi Janet, Thanks for responding. It was great to hear from you and hear about your daughter.We live in Orlando and when we first moved here we went to the theme parks a lot! Now we just go for special occasions. My daughter is sensitive to being outdoors in the heat so we only take her in the winter, maybe for mardi gras or other special events she might enjoy. She has a heart defect and can't ride a majority of the rides. She is the youngest of 5 kids with a fraternal twin who is also a girl. Her twin is fine and is in public school. So as far as socialization is concerned that isn't an issue at all except that with her condition, socialization isn't on the same level as a normally developing teenager as I am sure you are quite aware of. In fact when her twin was in elementary school I used to take my special needs daughter with me every time I went. She gets overwhelmed though She has a few sensory issues we are constantly working on, like she acts as if she is going to vomit whenever she sees someone chewing gum. Go figure! I'll definitely check out your blog and see what has benefited you. One thing is for sure unlike my older children she'll never give me the same problems, you know those problems that tag along with young adults, inability to manage money, college, relationships and more!lol Take care, Donna
    lovehmschlg likes this.

  9. #9
    lovehmschlg's Avatar
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    Wow, Donna. We have some things in common. Samantha is also the youngest of 5. My oldest is 29 and just got married. I have a 29yo step-daughter. Also a just-turned 19yo daughter. She just started college and now has her first boyfriend. So I completely relate to your last sentence....I would add time management issues, also. And Samantha has a twin brother, who is also fine. I've homeschooled Samantha, her twin brother and her sister, who just graduated homeschool. Samantha also has a heart defect for which she received surgery at 10 months of age. Do you know that you can ask for a special pass for your daughter and the family when you visit some of the parks? It helps us get through lines more quickly. She also gets restless, tires easily and is bothered by noise. She doesn't have the sensory issues your daughter has, though.
    So if socialization isn't an issue with your daughter, are her friends mostly typical kids (but younger age) or kids with special needs? It sounds like you've always homeschooled her. Her friends are through a hs support group?
    Last edited by lovehmschlg; 09-16-2014 at 02:03 PM.
    Janet
    enjoying homeschooling and learning with my kids, using T4L and T4W
    blogging our homeschool experiences at The Learning Hourglass


  10. #10
    specialkidsspecialhugs is offline Junior Member
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    Smile Hi Janet,

    Yes that is amazing. It is actually pleasantly surprising how much we do have in common! My son, who is the oldest at 30, followed by my 26 year old daughter, followed by my 24 old daughter, and then of course my twins who are 17, both girls. I had a chance to read your blog, The learning Hourglass. It was very comforting. I really enjoyed reading it. I tried to send you an email however I couldn't
    but I instead made a comment which included my email.Whenever you get a chance check it out. Take care Donna
    Quote Originally Posted by lovehmschlg3 View Post
    Wow, Donna. We have some things in common. Samantha is also the youngest of 5. My oldest is 29 and just got married. I have a 29yo step-daughter. Also a just-turned 19yo daughter. She just started college and now has her first boyfriend. So I completely relate to your last sentence....I would add time management issues, also. And Samantha has a twin brother, who is also fine. I've homeschooled Samantha, her twin brother and her sister, who just graduated homeschool. Samantha also has a heart defect for which she received surgery at 10 months of age. Do you know that you can ask for a special pass for your daughter and the family when you visit some of the parks? It helps us get through lines more quickly. She also gets restless, tires easily and is bothered by noise. She doesn't have the sensory issues your daughter has, though.
    So if socialization isn't an issue with your daughter, are her friends mostly typical kids (but younger age) or kids with special needs? It sounds like you've always homeschooled her. Her friends are through a hs support group?
    lovehmschlg likes this.

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