Money, Multiplication and ASD
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Thread: Money, Multiplication and ASD

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    bbooth's Avatar
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    Default Money, Multiplication and ASD

    My ASD daughter (age 9), is having a time with counting money. I just don't know what to do to help her? Also, multiplication is very, very confusing to her. I have introduced a multiplication chart but would prefer she memorized them. Do you have any tricks you could share?

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    angeleyes1307 is offline Member
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    ASD is a wide range of possible considerations, but assomeone who chose not to finish testing to avoid labeling as a child and withplenty of relations on the spectrum I would offer my opinion. I give mybackground simply so you understand that my opinion is based on a limitedexperience and minimal "official" opinions.
    As for multiplication tables: I know that straight memorization can be anightmare, but an understanding of the process and the reasons and what isreally "happening" can really help. There are times I can still think in my head"7+7=14+7=21+7=28+7=35+7=42=7, 6 times" faster than I can do straightrecall, and I can still do it faster than most of my co-workers and I work in amedical lab where we work a lot of numbers. And doing them repeatedly like that is how most of them stuck (when Ican do a direct recall, which is more often than not now.)
    I would ask the same thing about counting money. Is the problem remembering the values oractually working with them. If it isworking with them, set it up like an algorithm when you explain it. I know it sounds advanced for 9, but thedifferent mental processing it might be what works. Arbitrary stuff is hard to memorize andstandard tricks and associations don't always work well.
    Best of luck!
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    monnalu is offline Member
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    My grown son had ASD, but was not diagnosed until recently. When he was learning multiplication, I despaired of his every learning how to do it. He didn't even get the principle. When he was about 10 he started playing role playing games and had to calculate values for his characters' attributes. Then, it became real to him and he could suddenly do multiplication and division because there was an practical use for it. Today, he does calculus for fun, has lengthy scholarly conversations (via internet) with astropysicists, and does the most complicated equations in his head. He is a college graduate and is maybe the smartest person I know. Good luck with your daughter. I wish I had known about ASD when he was in elementary school Our lives would have been so different.
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    You've gotten some great advice from these parents.
    When we do the money assignments on T4L, I also bring out a box of coins for her to work with as she does her lessons. This way it's more concrete for her.
    Multiplication is also a concept she cannot understand. We've started using a calculator and will revisit it at a later time. Just like with other subjects or concepts, it's all about timing. She may be able to get it in a few months or next year.
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    TymansMom is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbooth View Post
    My ASD daughter (age 9), is having a time with counting money. I just don't know what to do to help her? Also, multiplication is very, very confusing to her. I have introduced a multiplication chart but would prefer she memorized them. Do you have any tricks you could share?
    My ASD son (age 11) was having a terrible time with multiplications - I finally bought a new pack of flash cards and wrote the answer to them in a bold green and had him read them to me every morning and every night. In just two weeks I am amazed! He knows most everyone with a little trouble with the 9's - He is more excited than I am. Now as I go through them the ones I KNOW that he is going to get I just ask him and move on. Try it...I hope it works for you as well as it did for us.
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    TymansMom, did you write the answer on the same side as the multiplication problem, or were the answers in the back?
    Janet
    enjoying homeschooling and learning with my kids, using T4L and T4W
    blogging our homeschool experiences at The Learning Hourglass


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    Quote Originally Posted by TymansMom View Post
    My ASD son (age 11) was having a terrible time with multiplications - I finally bought a new pack of flash cards and wrote the answer to them in a bold green and had him read them to me every morning and every night. In just two weeks I am amazed! He knows most everyone with a little trouble with the 9's - He is more excited than I am. Now as I go through them the ones I KNOW that he is going to get I just ask him and move on. Try it...I hope it works for you as well as it did for us.

    If you have your son put his fingers flat and go from left to right with the 9's he will learn them in a snap. Say... 9x3... well starting from the left pinky you would count over 3 (the middle finger)... the fingers on the left (of the middle finger) would be 2...the other side would be 7. You can do that will all of the 9's. Don't know if that made sense to you or not?

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    angelfire2826 is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Multiplication Help

    Quote Originally Posted by bbooth View Post
    My ASD daughter (age 9), is having a time with counting money. I just don't know what to do to help her? Also, multiplication is very, very confusing to her. I have introduced a multiplication chart but would prefer she memorized them. Do you have any tricks you could share?

    My son is 14 and has Aspergers so I totally understand the difficulty with multiplication. Something that has worked for him is teaching him that multiplying by 2 is one double, 4 is two doubles, and 8 is three doubles. For instance 6 x 8 is .... the double of 6 is 12, the double of 12 is 24, and the double of 24 is 48. Makes it so much easier. Then for 2, 5, and 10 is skip counting. 11 is just the number writen twice. Well, that changes when you get to 10. Still trying to figure one out for that. But when he gets to 12 I just have him do the number by 10 and the number by 2 and add together. 9x12.... 9x10 is 90, 9x2 is 18. 90+18 is 108. Doing it this way will pretty much works every time for him. It also works for multiplying by 7. break it down to multiplying by 5 and 2 and ad together. Pretty much only leaves 3s to deal with and there are tricks for that one too. Hope this helps.

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    My Aspie son, 11 has had great success using a DVD program called Times Tales for multiplication. The student learns mnemonic stories for each fact to help them have a visual memory for each fact. Teachers in public school said he would never learn multiplication, but after beginning the program, within two weeks, he knew most of his facts. He still uses the stories to help himself now, a year after learning them. I highly recommend you try it. As far as money, start out just learning skip-counting by 2's, 5's, 10's and 25's. Reinforce it with file folder games, online games, worksheets, etc., and when she has confidence with them, introduce money in increments.

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    Lightbulb MUSIC can bring multimodal memory fun and dancing reinforces kinesthetically

    For bright children with ADD, ADHD and ASD, memorizing facts can be excruciating; however, when I have been able to find music, rhyme or rhythm mnemonics or visual/tactical game aids, it can be the difference between a blank stare versus engagement and recall.

    On YouTube, I found for



    • There is a preoposition song several student groups in Classical Conversations made into music videos enumerating lists of prepositions which helped my daughter familiarize herself with the concept of position words
    • Songs for presidents, states, the old 'conjunction junction what's your function' and schoolhouse rock music cartoons are great supplements that provide multimodal reinforcement in more pallatable, more memorable way for all 3 of my kids. Jump Start has some great songs- Noun, noun, noun, noun and Verbs were well loved by all three of my kids.

    Be a Seuss. If recall's a hard time, make a song or a rhyme.
    .......or a game, or a drama -- when doing coin addition, I got some little finger puppet 'yukkies' and they 'yip yip' pleaded with my daughter to help them add the coins to help save them from the toy shark with the movable mouth that wanted to eat them. She was going through a phase where she liked making videos and she adores drama, soooo we made movies of 'Yip Yip Math'. It was a fun, different application for a while that helped engage her in a fun way. Cheers!
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