Need Help/Advice For Working with Extremely Distractible Child
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  1. #1
    RushTX is offline Junior Member
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    Default Need Help/Advice For Working with Extremely Distractible Child

    The subject above may not accurately describe what I mean, but I'll try to explain.

    My 8 year old daughter has problems with her hearing and auditory processing problems, which we're working with the doctor on. There may be some other issues along with that, but she hasn't been diagnosed with any psychological problems as of yet. (Testing in September)
    She has problems with reading comprehension, and like I said auditory comprehension, and she learns slow (is about a year to year and a half behind overall).

    When I try to work with her on Time 4 Learning (or any other school type thing), after what seems like only a few seconds to minute, she starts squealing and giggling and acting silly. I try to be patient and tell her to listen and pay attention, but I think I may be going about it the wrong way.

    So I was wondering if you all had some strategies for working with like extremely silly, hopping, giggling and clapping kids? Just telling her to "listen" and "pay attention" doesn't seem to be working and I admit, I have gotten very frustrated by this in the past and still can feel a bit frustrated by her behavior. But I do try not to get mad at her. I think actually I get mad at me because I'm often clueless at how to grab and hold onto her attention, for a few minutes anyway. I don't think this is something she's doing on purpose, and I really want to learn how to meet her at her level (if that makes sense).

    Thanks!

    Rushell

    **Edited to add - she's working on 2nd grade level, which I know is where she needs to be based on what she's been working on. The first LA lesson didn't go too well (I think because it was mostly just talking and no interaction, and plus morals/lessons in fables is a little too advanced for her understanding as of yet ). Math went a little bit better because of the more interaction, and she's a little familiar with place value (was recently working on this - hundreds, tens and ones in some other workbooks). Math is usually difficult for her, but more the memorizing facts took some time. I think we'll try the next lesson activities tomorrow where it talks about characters solving a problem. So I think we need more interaction and doing stuff than just listening (which she has a problem with).
    Last edited by RushTX; 05-03-2017 at 10:07 PM.

  2. #2
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Default Re: Need Help/Advice For Working with Extremely Distractible Child

    Hi. My youngest son has significant special needs, including a very short attention span. Here are some things to try.

    Allow your child to work several short sessions throughout the day.

    Try providing an exercise ball to sit on in front of the computer. Trying to maintain balance requires concentration that often keeps the mind from wandering.

    Provide a standing work station for a more modified version of the last suggestion.

    Let the child do some of the activities verbally with you instead requiring typing.

    For activities like spelling, toss the child a ball while you say the spelling word. Once they have spelled the word, they get to toss the ball back to you. That can work with any question and answer type of thing, so you might try it with quizzes and tests.

    I hope at least one of these helps. Hopefully others will be along with their ideas, too.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  3. #3
    RushTX is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Need Help/Advice For Working with Extremely Distractible Child

    Thank you, Kelly! Great ideas . Some we already do. I do have her work in short sessions, but I don't do it as often during the day as I probably should. We'll try to work on that. But slowly...

    And we actually DO have an exercise ball! I just pulled it out of the garage and cleaned it (it was a bit dusty ). Good idea, and she can use that for other things too.
    But I do wonder, regarding that idea - she has a small desk chair (like the ones that adjust, with just a seat and a back, no arms, nothing special. But it spins. When she sits on that chair, she spins (and rolls, it has wheels and rolls easily on the hard laminate floor in the school room area), and this is something distracts her from what we're doing. So do you think the chair (or the exercise ball), would they cause more harm than good? (Again maybe I'm not doing it right) I mean, I know that at her part time private co-op school, they have those exercise balls and encourage the kids to use them. But how do you get them to us them as helpful tools and not distractions?

    Can't really afford to get a standing desk, so we'll have to stick with what we've got. There's a table in there, and she has her own desk on one side of the living room. Plus I'm all for lying on the bed, the floor, sitting on the couch, or hanging upside down or whatever to do things and learn! I remember when my son was that age (he has ADHD and struggles with bipolar, anxiety, etc.). One time he ended up crawling inside and under his car bed (under the boards that support the mattress) to do some math. I thought it was brilliant! Yes, he had to bring a flashlight under there to see.

    And of course for my daughter, I type for her, but there isn't much typing involved in her lessons yet.

    But I think I figured out something with Language arts. The second grade is a bit too advanced for her right now. But of course the 1st is WAY too behind her level. The phonics lessons she doesn't need. She can read phonetically and does very well in actually pronouncing the words, and very seldom has trouble. But often times it doesn't mean much to her. This has slowly been improving, but like (for example) if she were to read a story, let's say about a girl who was learning how to ride a bike, she'd read the words, sentences, paragraphs, whatever. But it wouldn't immediately click in her brain like, hey I remember when I learned to ride a bike, and this happened, and this and this, etc.

    So anyway sorry I guess I'm kinda rambling. We're going to try to start with the 1st grade, after the phonics lessons and where the reading comprehension chapter starts. Hopefully that will help as well.

    Thanks again,
    Rushell

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