New autism diagnosis. IEP? What?
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Thread: New autism diagnosis. IEP? What?

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    shifflettk is offline Junior Member
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    Default New autism diagnosis. IEP? What?

    My son was diagnosed with autism just yesterday. His therapist urged us to get an IEP started asap. I don't understand how this works. Can we homeschool? We would be signing him up for public school in 2 weeks so I want to get this figured out before them. Public school is the very last thing I want for him. 😰😰 any help and advice is appreciated. We are from Kingsport, tn.

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    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Each state has its own homeschool laws. In my state (Oregon), I can develop a PDP (Parent Designed Plan) for my son to take the place of an IEP. The best place to find your state's homeschool laws is your state's Department of Education website. I just Googled "special education homeschool law Oregon" when we started.
    lovehmschlg likes this.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

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    Lilfox21 is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Is there any new information here? My daughter was just diagnosed but she is high functioning so she doesn't qualify for a public school IEP. We are thinking of homeschooling and using this curiculum but I have no idea where to start!

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    lovehmschlg is offline Forum Moderator
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    Hi Lilfox21,

    Many children with differing abilities have used Time4learning.It is easily adaptable. You are able to set the grade level where you want yourchild to be. You can set different grade levels for each subject. Time4Learning is student paced. Students can repeat and/or skip lessons/activities as needed.

    If you're asking about getting started with Time4Learning, you can sign up whenever you are ready to get your child started. If you're asking about getting started homeschooling, I'd suggest first looking into the homeschool laws for your state. You would need to meet the requirements for your state, which vary from state to state. Then you would be ready to choose your curriculum. Time4learning is a great choice for us because of the reasons I mentioned before, but we also like the Reports section, which helps us track our kids' progress and makes record-keeping easier. It also helps that our daughter loves it!

    Here is a free Guide to Homeschooling, which was written by some experienced homeschooling moms. Also, there are other forums here, like the New to Homeschooling or Thinking of Using Time4Learning where you can peek around at the posts or asks questions.

    I know it can seem a little scary or intimidating at first. I remember.....but it's only because it's new to you. Just take it one day at a time and before you know it, it'll seem natural. Someone said to me that it doesn't have to be a permanent choice. That helps to know...you can choose to put your child back in school or look for another option at any time.

    I hope this all helps.
    Janet
    enjoying homeschooling and learning with my kids, using T4L and T4W
    blogging our homeschool experiences at The Learning Hourglass


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    lene is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Each state has its own rules about homeschooling. I am a retired teacher and knew that the school system would fail my grandson once he got to the mid/high school level. The state requirements were not going to work for him and the homeschooling system established. When he was eligible, I convinced his parents to allow him to "drop out". I had investigated several programs and this one works the best. When we started he could not write nor read. I suggest that you go slowly and patiently; supplement with life skills (money, daily chores, work ethic, field trips); and use positive reinforcement. Public schools are not designed for individual mastery but rather whole group mastery. There are some wonderful teachers but their roadblocks keep them from total success. Start with lower grades and build up, don't worry about scope and sequence/curriculum but rather mastery of content. Use the KWL chart and it works for all areas , not just science.

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    marianes is offline Junior Member
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    Having a high IQ and being classified as "high functioning" doesn't necessarily mean that the child doesn't qualify for an IEP. IEPs are there to provide "FAPE" (Free Appropriate Public Education), meaning that they provide services to help a child access the school curriculum. For example, if a child has communication needs, such as difficult speaking, that could affect his/her ability to respond and ask questions, so it would affect his/her ability to access school curriculum and would qualify for speech therapy. Children with high functioning autism might have difficulty with pragmatic language (social language) that would keep them from effectively asking and answering questions appropriately- that would qualify them for an IEP.

    Many people (and even schools!) think that if the child is cognitively advanced enough to understand curriculum material on their grade level, then they don't need an IEP. That's very incorrect. The law says that the curriculum must be made accessible to the student. It's not fair to keep a student in a wheelchair out of school because he can't go up a stairwell, therefore accessibility is an issue. By the same token, it's not fair to allow a high functioning autistic student to struggle or fail because he can't interact appropriately with the teacher and students. Accessibility is an issue here too, and must be addressed. Both students in this example may be cognitively able to understand the material, but if they can't access it, then we have a problem.

    My preteen is 11 years old and cognitively at the high school level, but she has an IEP because of her social and pragmatic difficulties due to high functioning autism. She also needs extended time as needed to finish testing and assignments. She doesn't always need it, so she doesn't always use the extra time, but having this in place for her makes the curriculum accessible and fair to her.

    We don't homeschool, so I don't have experience with the details of IEPs for a homeschooled child. However, a homeschooled child is still legally a part of their home district, and if additional services such as therapies are needed for him/her to access any school curriculum, then it would have to be provided through an IEP. In this case, a school might be willing to work with you to provide speech, OT, etc as needed, but they legally can't do it without going through the IEP process. They're bound by red tape as much as anyone, to be honest. It's also a great resource to get much needed services such as therapies without having to pay for them out of pocket.

    Long story short, consider what you might need an IEP for. It's possible that you wouldn't need it at all for your specific homeschool plans, depending on your child's specific needs. If you feel like you do need or want to go through the process, look through the laws and experiences of special needs homeschoolers in your state to see what specifically you would need to do.

    Good luck!

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    My 17 year old daughter in grade 11 was diagnosed Asd and anxiety disorder 2 days ago. She has maintained a B average somehow and has not been able to attend school for weeks. It's Always been a struggle to get her to school. Now we know why. Her math is at a grade 5-7 level and reading comp at grade 6. Not sure where to go from here but am starting with this program today regardless.

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    Momcares11 is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lilfox21 View Post
    Is there any new information here? My daughter was just diagnosed but she is high functioning so she doesn't qualify for a public school IEP. We are thinking of homeschooling and using this curiculum but I have no idea where to start!
    That is incorrect. Our school tried to do that but we forced them to set up IEP meetings with us. We also formed meetings and safety issues.

    Don't let them deny you.

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