New and in desperate need of help!
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  1. #1
    ally.ash is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default New and in desperate need of help!

    Hi! I am new to this site and also new to the idea of homeschooling. I haven't actually made the transition but am very seriously planning to do so. I have a 6 year old son who has multiple diagnosis including, PDD-NOS, ADHD, mood disorder NOS, anxiety and expressive language disorder. This is his second year in the public school district and his needs are not being met, plain and simple. I have had spent a large portion of my time with numerous IEP meetings, interventions, trips to school, phone conversations, email, etc. The school district I reside in is great at working with children who have special needs who fit in a nice little box. For example, I also have a 6 year old daughter (they are twins) who has very classic autism, she is at a different school, same district and doing fantastic as she fits very well within their citywide autism program.

    I don't know what else to do, they are not meeting hardly any of his needs - only focused on his behaviroal needs and are doing nothing to help him succeed or help with any of his mental health issues. I want to start homeschooling him but this is a very foreign subject to me and I am wondering if anyone out there can share any experience or advice.

    Also I'm a single parent and do work out of the home. I am open to any "out of the box" suggestions for that as well.

    Thank you all so much and I'm very excited to connect with some people!

    Allyson

  2. #2
    MamaMary's Avatar
    MamaMary is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ally.ash View Post
    Hi! I am new to this site and also new to the idea of homeschooling. I haven't actually made the transition but am very seriously planning to do so. I have a 6 year old son who has multiple diagnosis including, PDD-NOS, ADHD, mood disorder NOS, anxiety and expressive language disorder. This is his second year in the public school district and his needs are not being met, plain and simple. I have had spent a large portion of my time with numerous IEP meetings, interventions, trips to school, phone conversations, email, etc. The school district I reside in is great at working with children who have special needs who fit in a nice little box. For example, I also have a 6 year old daughter (they are twins) who has very classic autism, she is at a different school, same district and doing fantastic as she fits very well within their citywide autism program.

    I don't know what else to do, they are not meeting hardly any of his needs - only focused on his behaviroal needs and are doing nothing to help him succeed or help with any of his mental health issues. I want to start homeschooling him but this is a very foreign subject to me and I am wondering if anyone out there can share any experience or advice.

    Also I'm a single parent and do work out of the home. I am open to any "out of the box" suggestions for that as well.

    Thank you all so much and I'm very excited to connect with some people!

    Allyson
    Hi Allyson,

    First of all, you've come to the right place. Believe me, many of us completely understand what you are going through. What I have found to be true is that homeschooling has allowed me the time to help my child grasp material one on one which has helped him to learn in a way that did not take place in a classroom. Though I say that very carefully as I do not want to ever encourage anyone to homeschool their child if this is not what's best for them personally.

    Here are the things I have found to be very helpful with my three (of four) sons with learning disabilities: (CAPD/ADD)

    1- I found more was not better. Keeping it simple helped my child THRIVE! When we have children with special needs it's very tempting to go overboard with curriculum, therapy, etc..,

    2- Time4Learning was life changing for us. Because my three boys cannot process verbal information very well they THRIVED on the STRONG interactive graphics! What I found was that when information went into their brains verbally it was like it was coated in teflon and slid all over the place, never taking root and staying put. When we started with Time4Leanring it was like the information was coated in velcro and for the first time they were able to build on basic concepts because they did stick and stay put. My oldest son Brandon who had been making forward progress, but not GREAT progress went up over two grade levels in math our very first year with Time4Learning.

    3- Working smarter and not harder! I spent from 1998-2007 homeschooling my children using big programs. We speech therapy, Neurodevelopmental therapy, Manipulative based math programs, textbook based math programs, you name it. In 2007 we decided to try Time4Learning to supplement our big programs. In just a very short time we dumped the big programs to try an experiment of just doing Time4Learning and we had one of the greatest testing results of our lives. (We do field trips, read great books, watch documentaries in addition)

    If you are looking for at home therapy programs I recommend:

    Dianne Craft - Solutions for dyslexia, dysgraphia, and struggling learners. BUT I would try just using Time4Learning by itself first and see if that doesn't net you the results before you invest in Brain Integration Therapy. It is extremely time consuming.

    HTH,
    Mary
    Mary, Child of the King of Kings, Jesus Christ! Wife to best friend and Mama to her four boys 91, 96, 00, 02, Homeschooling since 1998! Come visit us on our blog! http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/MamaMary/

  3. #3
    AlexSp Ed is offline Junior Member
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    I'm a grad student majoring in special ed. I teach general and special classes. I'm in California. I recommend a combination. Let the child stay in school and practice home schooling techniques on your free time. I mean the child is only 6 and in his 2nd year of public schooling. Wait it out a bit.

    Some general ed middle school students I frequent have trouble with academics. I tell them to be patient. Learning and meeting needs takes time, a lot of time.

  4. #4
    crickbrie is offline Member
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    Hi Allyson,
    I recently took my 9 year old daughter out of public school to homeschool her. She has been diagnosed with dyslexia and sensory processing disorder. The school was great at fitting her into an accademic regimen but never really helped HER. She just continued to struggle and was incredibly insecure. Just taking her out of that setting has really helped her.
    She is currently going to Occupational Therapy fo her sensory processing disorder and she LOVES it. Have you tried any outside resources?
    Good luck and let us know if you need more advice
    Christy

  5. #5
    lottie is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    uk
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    Hi Allyson,

    Your experience sounds a little like mine. I live in England, and have a 5 year old son who is in his second year at school. Not sure what grade that puts him in. We call it year 1. He is hyperactive, with sensory processing issues, and challenging behaviour. The school have tried lots of different strategies with him, but all to no avail, and he is currently on his 3rd exclusion from school. He has various IEP's and my husband I have attended numerous meetings with school, neuro paediatricians, mental health nurses, behaviour support team professionals with no improvement. Just high stress for all the family. When ever the phone rings now I feel sick, because I think it is the head asking me to come and get my son ( and it often is). I found T4L this week. My son loves the computer. So I am going to see If we can part time home school, with him going in the morning, and then doing about an hour in the afternoon on T4L. I never thought I would be involved with home schooling, but it now looks less frightening.
    Lottie.

  6. #6
    juanitaclay is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Fl
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    Hi! My name is Juanita. I have a 10 yr old son who has Pervasive Developmental Disorder & Selective Mutism. I pulled him out of public school last march due to the same reasons. By the time I pulled him out I couldn't get him anywhere near the classroom, was constantly called to IEP mtgs where they wanted black & white answers as to how to make him "better" & acted like I had a magic wand to make all the problems go away. They would agree to all of my suggestions, sometimes it would work for a few days, then when he was doing great, they would start treating him like all the other children and wonder why the problems came back. My son is high functioning, very intelligent, but by the time I pulled him out he was not accomplishing anything. I could usually expect a phone call by 8:30am asking me to come get him. By the time he got to school he would be overstimulated & "shut down". This was due to the selective mutism. When he becomes anxious he literally can't speak or move until the anxiety level goes down. This was explained to them many times. Instead of backing off & giving him some space they would try to be "firm" & force him to his feet. Then when he would strike out because he was being touched & couldn't handle it they would proceed to write him up. His anxiety was so bad I had to wait until toward the end of summer to get him started with schoolwork. So far he has done wonderfullly. I also work out of the home as a nurse. Some days we get a lot accomplished, other days we get nothing done, depending on what kind of day he is having. Sometimes we work in the morning, sometimes if the afternoon, & we have even done work at night. If he starts getting overstimulated & needs a break, no problem. He has improved 100% since I have started homeschooling. He is happier, laughs more, he even started having "imaginative play" a couple of months ago. He has made a friend that he plays with when he visits his grandmother & is showing signs of affection. It is very scary making the decision to homeschool your special needs child but is well worth it. There will always be bumps in the road but with homeschooling you have more freedom to weather them.

  7. #7
    ponywow's Avatar
    ponywow is offline Junior Member
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    Hi. I had a great deal of difficulty with trying to get my son's educational needs met in a public school. Bottom line is they just don't have the training or the staff to work with special needs kids. My son spent most of his time in class going outside on time out and being sent home early. This caused him to fall seriously behind. I have spent days reviewing tons of curriculum and although many of the books and materials are a great resource for information they are not geared towards teaching some children. My sons love to sit on the computer, watch U tube and play video games. That is where they feel most at home. Even my 16 month old has been in front of the computer learning the alphabet and phonics since birth. My 11 year old is in a public school and loves the socialization aspect of it. I am going to use this program to enhance his education.

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