New homeschooler with Aspie...need advice please :)
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  1. #1
    Poddygirl is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default New homeschooler with Aspie...need advice please :)

    Hi all....
    I've decided to take the leap into homeschooling my 10 year old Aspie son. I feel confident that we are making the right choice, except the problem is we are not sure what the choice should actually be.
    Here's the thing. My son was diagnosed a year ago but we knew long before that something was wrong as far as school went. Since KG he would scream and cry every morning to go to school and every night before bed begging not to go the next day. Guaranteed I would get a call at least once a week from a teacher about his behavior....mostly his refusal to do the classwork. Once the diagnosis came it all made sense, so we pulled him from the school that wasn't doing him any good (if you're not a cookie cutter kid there you don't survive) and put him into a very small school with special needs trained teachers. He has improved academically and socially in the past 2 years there but he still begs and pleads to not go to school ever again. I know he is no longer being bullied and he is not being abused in any way...in fact, the staff is very supportive and gives him a lot of leeway if he's having an "off" day. Still, given his absolute hatred of traditional school and all things called "learning", we feel he may be happier at home and will excel beyond our expectations at this point.
    Here's the thing: I'm a fairly "lazy" parent, meaning I don't want to be doing charts, logs, lesson plans, etc etc, all the things that homeschooling seems to entail. Obviously supervision and help is needed and that's fine with me but not an 8 hour day of said chores...I dislike school just as much as he does. So I looked into T4L and K12 and FLVS type schooling for him, thinking it would be perfect because everything is done up and there are teachers online to follow up. Another homeschooling mom reminded me that what we are doing now DOES NOT WORK for him (traditional schooling) and that bringing the same thing home will simply be more of the same resistance. I tend to agree! So now what do I do? I'm fairly certain once he unschools a bit and relaxes, he will be more willing to learn....right now it's like beating a dead horse....but should I bring brick and mortar home or go the full hippie mom type thing, making up lesson plans on my home made paper that I slaved over all night lol? I'm at a loss here. I don't know what combining the two systems entails, nor do I even understand where I will be starting with him because his days are so very structured at school and I want a much more relaxed approach at home. He likes and needs structure yes but it gets really old really fast for him. If you're still with me at this point I appreciate it! Long post but I hope somebody can guide me. Thank you

  2. #2
    eltus is offline Junior Member
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    Default your not gonna like my answer but here goes:))

    Quote Originally Posted by Poddygirl View Post
    Hi all....
    I've decided to take the leap into homeschooling my 10 year old Aspie son. I feel confident that we are making the right choice, except the problem is we are not sure what the choice should actually be.
    Here's the thing. My son was diagnosed a year ago but we knew long before that something was wrong as far as school went. Since KG he would scream and cry every morning to go to school and every night before bed begging not to go the next day. Guaranteed I would get a call at least once a week from a teacher about his behavior....mostly his refusal to do the classwork. Once the diagnosis came it all made sense, so we pulled him from the school that wasn't doing him any good (if you're not a cookie cutter kid there you don't survive) and put him into a very small school with special needs trained teachers. He has improved academically and socially in the past 2 years there but he still begs and pleads to not go to school ever again. I know he is no longer being bullied and he is not being abused in any way...in fact, the staff is very supportive and gives him a lot of leeway if he's having an "off" day. Still, given his absolute hatred of traditional school and all things called "learning", we feel he may be happier at home and will excel beyond our expectations at this point.
    Here's the thing: I'm a fairly "lazy" parent, meaning I don't want to be doing charts, logs, lesson plans, etc etc, all the things that homeschooling seems to entail. Obviously supervision and help is needed and that's fine with me but not an 8 hour day of said chores...I dislike school just as much as he does. So I looked into T4L and K12 and FLVS type schooling for him, thinking it would be perfect because everything is done up and there are teachers online to follow up. Another homeschooling mom reminded me that what we are doing now DOES NOT WORK for him (traditional schooling) and that bringing the same thing home will simply be more of the same resistance. I tend to agree! So now what do I do? I'm fairly certain once he unschools a bit and relaxes, he will be more willing to learn....right now it's like beating a dead horse....but should I bring brick and mortar home or go the full hippie mom type thing, making up lesson plans on my home made paper that I slaved over all night lol? I'm at a loss here. I don't know what combining the two systems entails, nor do I even understand where I will be starting with him because his days are so very structured at school and I want a much more relaxed approach at home. He likes and needs structure yes but it gets really old really fast for him. If you're still with me at this point I appreciate it! Long post but I hope somebody can guide me. Thank you
    Hi I am a mom of two aspies and i have been in your shoes. my 10 year old learns very differently then the traditional kid so i am now a full time stay at home mom because my kid would not learn what was given to her in school. instead she likes rocks and historical places so this is how she learns! all math is related to fossils or rocks and minerals. weather is finding their weight or measuring them or problem solving all problems will be in relation to a dig or a historical site how big as the battle how many soldiers how many dies. use division percentages calculations based on facts she likes. Now here is the part you are not gonna like. i have yet to find a software that can tailor this! you have to be the one to explain it in this scenario and then let them take the online tour of the math problem so now they have something they can relate to. there is no program that is going to take this and make it easy for you. but if you find one! please share
    I am new here and i just started this program for her. i am looking forward to her liking the visual lessons and oi wont have to do as much of historical reenactments for her!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Default Hi, sitting with similar situation

    I have two children, a girl 8 has aspergers and my son 6 has autism. Difference is she can speak he can only use small sentences. Both are very intelligent but just can't articulate what they are thinking properly. Both love computers and that is how I am slowly but surely getting my son to learn something. My daughter is another issue entirely she has been in schools since she was 3 and at the age of 8 she still cannot read on her own so I decided to do it myself as the teachers don't seem to know what to do with her. I have been struggling with figuring out what is the best course to go so I enrolled her on T4L hoping this will work. I am starting at preK just so that I am covered on all bases seeing as technically she has already done and 'passed' grade 1 (they just put her through stating she cannot be held back another year)

    I am kind of floundering struggling to find a balance as I was never really into school myself and struggled with maths all my life. But I can see this is what she needs, she needs someone who loves her and who is willing to wait for her while she doodles and struggles and not rush her, it's only been two weeks and I hope to get into a functioning routine soon. I put her in front of the computer for at least an hour each day, first she has to do language lessons then maths and then science. She enjoys them. The rest of the day is dedicated to writing, learning to read and art. I am so scared I am doing it wrong and it did my heart good to read that there are other parents struggling with similar things as me. I am not alone in doing something so 'crazy', according to others. My dad even made the comment that he thought I was off to mars with my crazy idea to pull my daughter out of school seeing as my son has never been.

    Thank you for sharing and hope it works for you as much as I hope it works for myself as there really are very view online curriculum's that work for aspies.

  4. #4
    lovehmschlg's Avatar
    lovehmschlg is offline Forum Moderator
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    Default

    Hello, Rosabeth.

    My daughter learned to read when she was 9 years old. She has Down syndrome. She is an avid reader now. She absolutely LOVES to read. Shortly after she started reading, I found Time4Learning. It was perfect timing because it made reading fun! We also read a lot of books together. When she was struggling in the beginning, we would 'buddy' read. I would have her read the words I thought she'd be able to de-code, or the words that were familiar to her. Gradually we moved to her reading every other page. Oftentimes she'd read the same book repeatedly to build her confidence.

    Rosabeth, I didn't like school either. It's one of the reasons I homeschool. I want my kids to like learning. We pursue their individual interests. So, for example, when my daughter started showing an interest in horses, we borrowed lots of books from the library about horses, fiction and non-fiction. We looked at movies. We took a field trip to a ranch. She took riding lessons. My son enjoys watching documentaries, so we watch lots of documentaries on Netflix.

    I know with my daughter with special needs, having her at home and teaching her at home allows us more time to work on things like character training, life skills, areas she struggles in, like math and handwriting. We use a Draw-Write-Now books, in which she learns to draw and then she copies a few short sentences to go with the picture. Your kids may enjoy these interactive science lessons online.

    Don't get discouraged. You're doing the right thing. People tend to put down what they don't know. And homeschooling carries a lot of myths and stereotypes that couldn't be further from the truth. It does sound like you're making all the right choices. It's good that you're starting her from earlier grades. I'd just have her do the quizzes, and if she does well, I'd have her skip the accompanying lessons. If she does poorly on the quiz, then I'd have her do the lessons. The Lessons Scope and Sequence for each grade level may also help you determine what lessons she may need to do or skip. Lastly, I'll just share the Hints and Helps page for new Time4Learning users.

    Enjoy your homeschooling journey!
    Janet
    enjoying homeschooling and learning with my kids, using T4L and T4W
    blogging our homeschool experiences at The Learning Hourglass


  5. #5
    MominTexas is offline Junior Member
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    Default

    My aspie son is 14 and is working at the 7th grade level. He hates to write. It's not just the difficulty with motor skills; it's also the impatience of trying to get out what he's wants to express. He had all the usual modifications and therapies back in public school 1st - 3rd grade but it all went out the door when he turned 9 and that's pretty much when I decided to homeschool. He's used all computer based programs.
    I think that each kid needs to be allowed to follow their own path in learning - and we just have to guide them along. Sometimes that path changes...thus requiring a change in method. We've done worksheet homeschool, Switched on Schoolhouse, Brainpop. Now we're on Time4learning. I know he's bright - not a genius - just bright. I know he has trouble communication - maybe a bit of MERLD.
    And don't be tempted to judge your child by the standard of others...be it the government, the education system, or someone else's child. They each will reach their own potential.

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