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Thread: New member

  1. #1
    Sosthene is offline Junior Member
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    Default New member

    Hello,

    I am new to the board and I am currently homeschooling my 6 year old son diagnosed with autism. He is verbal ; however, 95% consists of echolalia and scripting. He's doing well on time4learning at the kindergarten level . He's going to need an evaluation this year and I wanted to know what the evaluation entails for special needs children.
    Any information will be greatly appreciated.


    Andree

  2. #2
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    MamaMary is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: New member

    Hi Andree,

    Welcome to Time4Learning! I am so glad you're here. I don't know much about echolalia and scripting? I do know that we have a very large presence in working with children who have any form of delay. The strong, interactive graphics add velcro to the information so it goes into the brain, sticks and stays put. That way my child is able to continue to build upon basic concepts. Time4learning has been a blessing for our family. How is it going?
    Mary, Child of the King of Kings, Jesus Christ! Wife to best friend and Mama to her four boys 91, 96, 00, 02, Homeschooling since 1998! Come visit us on our blog! http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/MamaMary/

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    SahmIam is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: New member

    Welcome Andree! Our son has autism as well, though he is a bit younger (PreK). I'm not sure what you mean with regards to evaluation. Do you mean through the state or the curriculum?

    Mary, scripting and echolalia are ways of talking that aren't necessarily what would be considered "true" conversation or mainstream speech. For example, we were at a play area with trains and a little girl said hello. Callum didn't say hello or look at her, but he repeated one of his books in its entirety to her. He knew he had to say something, but he wasn't sure what. That's echolalia, repeating something he saw or read verbatim days or weeks later. Scripting is more like using a formula to try to communicate. A few days ago I moved a table into Callum's room. He said, "The boy is beside the table. The boy is on the table. The boy is under the table, etc" and when I asked him if he learned that at school, he said, "Yeah, the bear is beside the box. The bear is on the box, etc." He wasn't saying "Yeah" as in the way ppl tend to do, it's just something he picked up from the girls. He uses it as a bridge to repeat whatever you say to him. Also, last night we took him trick-or-treating and he knew they were giving him candy but he didn't get why he had to say trick or treat. At one point he spoke, saying, "The trick-or-treat is brown" when he put the Snickers bar into his bag. I say CLOSE ENOUGH!!! lol
    Melissa.

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    MamaMary is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: New member

    Quote Originally Posted by SahmIam
    Mary, scripting and echolalia are ways of talking that aren't necessarily what would be considered "true" conversation or mainstream speech. For example, we were at a play area with trains and a little girl said hello. Callum didn't say hello or look at her, but he repeated one of his books in its entirety to her. He knew he had to say something, but he wasn't sure what. That's echolalia, repeating something he saw or read verbatim days or weeks later. Scripting is more like using a formula to try to communicate. A few days ago I moved a table into Callum's room. He said, "The boy is beside the table. The boy is on the table. The boy is under the table, etc" and when I asked him if he learned that at school, he said, "Yeah, the bear is beside the box. The bear is on the box, etc." He wasn't saying "Yeah" as in the way ppl tend to do, it's just something he picked up from the girls. He uses it as a bridge to repeat whatever you say to him. Also, last night we took him trick-or-treating and he knew they were giving him candy but he didn't get why he had to say trick or treat. At one point he spoke, saying, "The trick-or-treat is brown" when he put the Snickers bar into his bag. I say CLOSE ENOUGH!!! lol
    Thank you so much Melissa. I love this description and the examples. I couldn't help, but think of my Colton. He does these type of things. He's my child that is most significantly effected by CAPD. An example is last year when we went to the Holocaust Museum. They had a holocaust survivor come in and share her story. At the end she asked if any of the children had any questions. Colton raised his hand and said, "Did you hear the bell"? The whole room stopped, looked at him, looked at me, looked at her and then back at him. I forget how we saved that, but it wasn't until later I learned what he had meant. We had watched, "The Diary Of Ann Frank" and when danger came into the shop they would buzz a bell to warn the families in the attic to be quiet. He was taking all his information and mixing it up. There was no explanation of what "the bell" meant. You are such a good mom Melissa. I meant to ask you how everything was going for Callum with his new school? It sounds GREAT!
    Mary, Child of the King of Kings, Jesus Christ! Wife to best friend and Mama to her four boys 91, 96, 00, 02, Homeschooling since 1998! Come visit us on our blog! http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/MamaMary/

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    Sosthene is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: New member

    Thank you for replying

    We are doing very well on time4learning. I also use IXL.com to practice his math skills. As for the evaluation ,I was referring to the state evaluation. I wanted to know if they have specific tests for special needs children. Any input is welcomed.
    Andree

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    SahmIam is offline Senior Member
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    Andree, I am not sure about hte rules for state testing for homeschooling children with special needs, but I will say that Callum's IEP through the school states that he is exempt from state testing due to his disability. If there is an alternative for meeting the requirement in your state, I would look into that. For example, here in Washington, there is an article that says school-aged children (8-18 ) must either be tested yearly, or have their progress evaluated by a teacher currently working in the state. So if my special needs child was not able to take state testing for whatever reason, he'd have that to fall back on. Definitely look into local laws or get in touch with someone knowledgeable about the laws in your area. From what I understand, in some areas there is a lot of tension when it comes to "special ed kids" learning at home.
    Melissa.

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