Report on Autism....did you see this???
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    Default Report on Autism....did you see this???

    October 5th, 2009
    Study: 1 percent of children have autism or related disorders
    Posted: 01:08 AM ET
    (CNN) — A study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics indicates about 1 percent of children ages 3 to 17 have autism or a related disorder, an increase over previous estimates.

    “This is a significant issue that needs immediate attention,” Dr. Ileana Arias, deputy director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday. “A concerted effort and substantial national response is warranted.”

    The study used data from the federal government’s 2007 national survey of children’s health. The survey of parents was conducted by the Health Resources and Services Administration, and by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    The results are based on a national telephone survey of more than 78,000 parents of children ages 3 to 17.

    In the study, parents were asked whether a health care provider had ever told them their child had an autism spectrum disorder. ASD is a group of brain disorders comprising autism and two less severe disorders: Asperger’s disorder and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified.

    Children with the disorder show impairment in social interaction and in their ability to communicate. They also display repetitive behavior.

    The investigators also asked a follow-up question: Were the children considered to have ASD now? Nearly 40 percent of the parents and guardians said no.

    That finding led the authors to question whether some of the children originally diagnosed as having ASD may have been improperly diagnosed, since the disorders are not considered curable.

    But Kogan said the two surveys cannot be compared because the earlier investigators did not ask the follow-up question about whether the children were still considered to have the disorder.

    Still, based on the findings, lead author Dr. Michael D. Kogan of HRSA’s maternal and child health bureau estimated the prevalence of ASD among U.S. children ages 3 to 17 at 110 per 10,000 — slightly more than 1 percent.

    Boys were four times as likely as girls to have ASD, and non-Hispanic black and multiracial children were less likely than non-Hispanic white children.

    He estimated that 673,000 children have ASD in the United States.

    Monday’s findings of nearly 1 in 100 appear to indicate an increase from the average of 1 in 150 that was reported in 2003, the researchers said.

    The researchers urged caution in interpreting the change, noting that an increase in diagnoses does not necessarily mean that more children have the disorder. It could simply reflect a heightened awareness of the disorder.

    “We don’t know whether the change in the number over time is a result of the change in the actual condition, in the actual number of conditions or in part due to the fact that the condition is being recognized differently,” Arias said.

    She said that preliminary results from a separate, CDC-funded study she is working on also indicate that about 1 percent of children in the United States are affected by ASD. That study is to be published later this year, she said.

    “This is a behavioral diagnosis, and it’s difficult to make, and it’s difficult to make at young ages,” said Dr. Peter van Dyck, HRSA’s associate administrator for maternal and child health.

    Half of the cases were considered mild by their parents, the study reported.

    The results underscore the importance of creating policies that will result in early identification and intervention, the officials said.

    The reports raise “a lot of questions about how we are preparing in terms of housing, employment, social support — all the issues that many of these people are going to need,” said Dr. Tom Insel, director of the National Institute of Mental Health.

    “It also raises questions about how well we’re prepared in the educational system to provide for the special needs of many of these kids.”

    Insel said the federal government is beefing up the resources to address autism and related disorders, with $85 million being appropriated by the National Institutes of Health and $48 million for next year by the HRSA.

    if you have an autistic child......were you included in this survey??? deni.............
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    Default Re: Report on Autism....did you see this???

    Deni,

    I am so glad you shared this report. I thought it was interesting looking at the numbers, wondering who was not included? I am glad to see that there are those out there taking notice. Awesome information
    Mary, Child of the King of Kings, Jesus Christ! Wife to best friend and Mama to her four boys 91, 96, 00, 02, Homeschooling since 1998! Come visit us on our blog! http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/MamaMary/

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    denimay's Avatar
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    Default Re: Report on Autism....did you see this???

    Mary....It's also interesting to ME that so many (40%) parents responded to the 'follow up' question with NO! (their children were no longer considered to have "ASD.)" The respondents in the second study were not asked the follow up question so we don't know how many of THOSE children are no longer considered "ASD." I've often felt that children are "mis-diagnosed" ....most expecially when it comes to ADD/ADHD and dyslexia.

    When I was in school back in dinosaur times there were always kids who fidgeted, who were a little "slow" to learn new things, as well as those who seemed to sail through effortlessly. No heavy labels, some extra effort by the teacher.....and (thank you LORD!!) I was allowed to read when I'd finished my work/test.

    When I was taking my first 'teacher ed' class in college (I was "old" then too), I had a class (psych of ed??) that required us to put in X amount of hours "tutoring" a child who'd been labelled "special needs" by the local elem. school. In MY class we learned about IEP's and IQ tests and we were visited by "dis/abled" people (guy in a wheelchair/a blind woman/ a deaf AND blind woman, etc.) I don't remember ANY visitors who did NOT have some sort of PHYSICAL reason for being learning challenged. And they were all meeting and besting their challenges.

    Anyhow, I got a little boy....first grade I think. Nice family, nice suburb. Three kids of which this child was the youngest. I went to his house and did some (of my own) assessment activities. Played some games with him and (gently) worked on some phonics and read to him and left some of my own books for his parents to read to him.

    Understand that at this point in my life I had already been teaching people how to read for almost 20yrs (I started with project head start when I was 15 - recruited out of high school). I couldn't see ANY problems with this child and I asked his parents if I could see his paperwork and if I could have permission to share it with my instructor or other "professional" to assist me in being sure that I understood what the papers actually said.

    They said they would be VERY grateful if I could understand these papers and then explain them (the papers) to THEM (the parents). They'd been to the IEP meeting and had understood NOTHING and had been too intimidated by all of the "experts" to ask any meaningful questions. They left confused and a little fearful and maybe a little insulted. Having been part of more than a few IEP's, as the teacher, I knew first hand how horrible they could be for the parents and how snotty some of the "experts" can be.

    So to try and shorten this at least a bit, I consulted with several people to be sure "I" understood what each paper said and then I set up a meeting with the parents and said I wanted the kid to be there as well....the parents were very surprised at this, but I said that if this boy was going to trust me (and them) we should not have this discussion "behind" his back. He missed the first 15 min. of the meeting because of soccer practice, but joined us after.

    I started by telling the parents that the VERY WORST THING all this paperwork said about their son was that he was AVERAGE. (this was true) I also pointed out that this same score only a few years earlier would have labelled him "educable - mentally retarded." and that THIS really meant that who ever was in charge of creating/giving/and assessing this type of (IQ) test could and HAD manipulated things in order to 'interpret' the #scores however they chose.

    I talked to them a little bit about 'birth order' and loaned them a good book I had on the subject. Their three children were textbook examples; the first (boy) outgoing and personable, the second (girl) always happy to please others, and the 3rd ("my" boy), content and complacent and possibly the happiest of the three.

    I told them that "I" could find NO signs of "dyslexia" in this kid......that many, many children reverse a few letters in the begining (R and S most often, E, B, and D sometimes)...but that we had already corrected that (in about 6 sessions) and that he COULD read much better than anyone had thought he could. (The parents agreed that he seemed "much smarter" than the school thought he was.)

    I also pointed out that THEY (the parents) had been with this child his whole life (7 or 8) years. They had taught him TONS of stuff that he had no trouble learning and that THEY would know better than ANYone if he had any kind of "disability" AND that they needed to trust in themselves and not let the "experts" steamroller over them. I also offerred to go to an IEP with them as an advocate for their child.

    I also did some reseach (and a few interviews at this kid's school) on my own and this is what I discovered. The PS this kid was attending was an okay school. It was a neighborhood school in an upper-middle class neighborhood in a small town/city in Northern California. The dad's had good paying jobs, the moms were mostly stay-at-home, most everyone attended church regularyly....a realy "Leave It to Beaver" kind of place. (most of the parents, dads AND moms were college educated)

    WEEEEEEELLLLLLLLLLLll.....low and behold, this school had just received a very LARGE (I think gov't) GRANT for assessment of and services for "special needs" students with the biggest part of the grant reserved for "services and material" to provide for all of the "special ed" kids that could be found in this particular school.

    They (the school) had pretty much "assessed" ALL of the kids in this school (k-8) regardless of GPA or complete lack of any previous problems. AND despite the national average of truly "dyslexic" people in the general population was about 6% (yes, I know some feel this is as high as 25-40%...more later.... THIS school had found that almost 80% (no typo, almost EIGHTY PERCENT!!) of their students where not only "dyslexic" but ADD as well!! (ADHD hadn't been invented yet.) I interviewed about a dozen teachers, the school counsellor and the Principal at this school and the general feeling of the teachers was that they were REQUIRED to 'find problems' so that the school could keep all of the grant money. The counsellor was going to become the Vice Principal in charge of Special Ed and the Principal just wanted to do "what was best for the children!"

    It's a good thing that I didn't want to spend the rest of my life in this really nice community because I (honestly, not on purpose!) sort of started a small revolution. My research had also turned up the non-disseminated information that parents could "opt out" of any "special ed" program the school offerred.

    I went with my student's parents to a second IEP (requested by the parents -another right that was either NOT given to the parents or seriously glossed over). I showed my assessments, including a tape of this kid reading and laughing and talking about what he'd read (about 12 min.) They (really rudely) challenged my credentials and expertise and I (politely) walked them through all of the papers and asked them to show me where ANY one of them said this child was 'below average' or had demonstrated any lack of ability. I asked the teacher if this was the lowest performing kid in the class (no), if his grades were really low (no, B- average), if he was in danger of being held back (no) if he had problems with other kids or no friends (no)......she finally said that he didn't VOLUNTEER much to answer questions in class, but she believed that he knew most of the answers.
    (when "I" was in school we called this "shy" not disabled) I was asked to speak with some other parents and a LOT of parents formed a goup that found and paid an "independent" expert to assess the assessments of their children, some parents had their children independently retested. And in the end the school ended up with about 8% of the school population who needed/wanted extra "special ed" services.

    I think that ALL of our children face many challenges today. They are bombarded with a multitude of electronic media, tons of advertising, gratuitous sex, violence and foul language in videos, lice, cold and flue viruses, too much sugar and junk food (not to mention the whole vacination issue). Public schools are full of drugs, bullying, overwhelmed teachers, unhelpful administrators and apathy.

    Research (and anecdotal evidence) shows that many "problems" can be avoided/eliminated by simply turning off the tv, computer, video games, cell phone(s) and spending more time in family pursuits. Homeschooling has proven itself to be a positive, constructive alternative to public or private school. HOMEcooking is better than "fast food" and sugarless candy/gum is another alternative as well as water or (natural) juice in lieu of "soda".....where I currently live WATERMELON "juice" is very popular (just cut up the watermelon and throw the chunks into a blender, and strain out the seeds)

    I know there are a lot of kids who do have special needs and who should be evaluated and receive whatever 'special help' they need. My own son has a speech delay and I would like him to be evaluated (in both English and Spanish) and get some professional therapy. I think there MIGHT be some kind of processing issue............but maybe he just needs more time or a better teacher... I've been teaching people how to read since I was 15...the youngest was 4 the oldest 78. I've taught...who knows??......over 45 years......maybe a couple thousand. I taught maybe 300 latino (mostly) moms how to read and write in Spanish when I didn't really speak much Spanish. In all of my experience I've only had 3 truly dyslexic students......though many of the kids referred to me (from PS) had been "diagnosed" as dyslexic. I also had a lot of kids who'd been deemed "anti-social" and ADD or ADHD. In every one of MY cases, the child simply had not been taught how to read. Once the child (kids are easy) learned to read (6-8 wks/1 hour/day/5-6 days/wk) he/she gained self-confidence, self-esteem, and a willingness to 'take chances' and try new things. Many, many, many of my kids not only learned to read, but suddenly ceased to be behavioral problems. Suddenly they weren't so "ADD/ADHD" and suddenly they could "focus" better. Many members on this forum have testified to significant "behavioral problems" disappearing when their kids were pulled from PS.

    So this is tooooo long and has taken forever to write but I want to leave you with 2 things. 1)Beware of labels and "assessments" offerred by PS: where in the past there was a lot of money and therefore impetus for finding lots of "special needs" children, now there's not enough money to go around so the impetus is to NOT FIND any more "special kids."

    2) I have believed since that first teacher ed class taken in the early 80's that "special ed" was created to provide jobs for all of the out of work teachers in the 70's (after the baby boom - before the baby boom "echo"). I believe that there are many good people in the world and that some are even in education. But that doesn't mean every parent can relax her/his vigilence over his/her children. deni..............
    deni may ............
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    Default Re: Report on Autism....did you see this???

    Quote Originally Posted by denimay
    Mary....It's also interesting to ME that so many (40%) parents responded to the 'follow up' question with NO! (their children were no longer considered to have "ASD.)" The respondents in the second study were not asked the follow up question so we don't know how many of THOSE children are no longer considered "ASD." I've often felt that children are "mis-diagnosed" ....most expecially when it comes to ADD/ADHD and dyslexia.


    So this is tooooo long and has taken forever to write but I want to leave you with 2 things. 1)Beware of labels and "assessments" offerred by PS: where in the past there was a lot of money and therefore impetus for finding lots of "special needs" children, now there's not enough money to go around so the impetus is to NOT FIND any more "special kids."

    2) I have believed since that first teacher ed class taken in the early 80's that "special ed" was created to provide jobs for all of the out of work teachers in the 70's (after the baby boom - before the baby boom "echo"). I believe that there are many good people in the world and that some are even in education. But that doesn't mean every parent can relax her/his vigilence over his/her children. deni..............
    That is interesting that they followed up with a "no"? I found #2 interesting. I never even thought of that?
    Mary, Child of the King of Kings, Jesus Christ! Wife to best friend and Mama to her four boys 91, 96, 00, 02, Homeschooling since 1998! Come visit us on our blog! http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/MamaMary/

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    Default Re: Report on Autism....did you see this???

    Quote Originally Posted by denimay
    Mary....It's also interesting to ME that so many (40%) parents responded to the 'follow up' question with NO! (their children were no longer considered to have "ASD.)" The respondents in the second study were not asked the follow up question so we don't know how many of THOSE children are no longer considered "ASD." I've often felt that children are "mis-diagnosed" ....most expecially when it comes to ADD/ADHD and dyslexia.


    So this is tooooo long and has taken forever to write but I want to leave you with 2 things. 1)Beware of labels and "assessments" offerred by PS: where in the past there was a lot of money and therefore impetus for finding lots of "special needs" children, now there's not enough money to go around so the impetus is to NOT FIND any more "special kids."

    2) I have believed since that first teacher ed class taken in the early 80's that "special ed" was created to provide jobs for all of the out of work teachers in the 70's (after the baby boom - before the baby boom "echo"). I believe that there are many good people in the world and that some are even in education. But that doesn't mean every parent can relax her/his vigilence over his/her children. deni..............
    That is interesting that they followed up with a "no"? I had never even considered #2. I do know that my personal experience with families in the upper grades, who use special ed, do not feel as though it helps, but they don't know any other options.
    Mary, Child of the King of Kings, Jesus Christ! Wife to best friend and Mama to her four boys 91, 96, 00, 02, Homeschooling since 1998! Come visit us on our blog! http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/MamaMary/

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    Default Re: Report on Autism....did you see this???

    Wow, it sounds as though you think the surge in children being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders is due in large part to schools wanting money for special education services. Is that what you were saying? If so, I must vehemently disagree. Here, in a very low budget school in the states, it is difficult to get children into special ed without a prior diagnosis from a doctor. They receive enough money to support a great special ed program, but very few children are accepted. There are 8 children in our district who are in C's program. I saw many children at the screening who were not disabled whose PARENTS were trying to get them into the program as an all-day daycare, but they were refused.

    I think the larger number comes from two sources. First, the PDD-NOS and Asperger's diagnoses were not in the DSM until the 4th edition, which came out after the 1/150 number. Then, when those kids were getting diagnosed, some of which have famous parents, it led to more awareness because autism became a disorder of many faces. "Autism" used to be considered the completely non-functional "mentally retarded" child locked away in a special home. Now there is more research and better diagnostic tools. Children with autism can be functional and extremely smart. That doesn't mean that their schools are simply trying to get mroe funding. It means that children with Aspergers and classic (frank) autism are distinguished from their neuro-typical peers. They are called different because they are different. They're not bored, they're differently wired. Children who seem to "grow out of it" don't change their brains so much as they are simply more adaptable than the children who don't. They can mold their special abilities in order to make it in the world. The 40% of parents who claim that their children are cured may be in denial, have children who have adapted, or maybe have been misdiagnosed.

    Even with better diagnostic criteria, less knowlegeable doctors may sometimes misdiagnose behaviors that stem from other disorders, which left untreated cause the children to seem autistic-like. There is a metabolic disorder, such as the one that McCarthy's son likely has, which can be controlled with a CFGF diet. In that case, the children aren't autistic, but that's an accidental misdiagnosis, not treachery of the government. That is why the average autism diagnosis take months if not years. It is a combination of medical history, observation, and other testing with a variety of individuals. There may be some doctors quick to diagnose, but there are many more who aren't. Being diagnosed as autistic can be a blessing and a curse because it gives a parent much sought-after answers, but can also still be a stigma.

    It is my honest opinion that making judgements that don't take into account the reasearch being done and the parameters of the polls and studies can't lead to the answer. If anything, it leads to knee-jerk reactions that only serve to devalue a piece of MY child that is not just a label, but at the core of his being.
    Melissa.

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    Default Re: Report on Autism....did you see this???

    Oh Melissa.........please forgive me. It was NOT my intent to insult you or your child or any other special child. I did say that I believe that all children who need special services should receive them. I don't pretend to be any kind of authority on AS disorders. This is not my particular area of expertise. However, I have plowed through enough research to make my eyes bleed. I did this mostly because my son has a significant speech delay and I wanted to know why.

    I suspect that you too have poured through the literature as well. I've read Jenny McCarthy's first book. It gives one parent's perspective and she brings up a lot of interesting points for further research and consideration.

    I've read tons about AS disorders and don't believe that my son is on the spectrum.....but I have seen pie graphs where the "spectrum" is 180 degrees.....does that mean that 1/2 of the world population would qualify?? The only "symptom" on the laundry list of possible symptoms for AS disorders that my son has is speech delay.

    We have no services here. There was a speech therapist here one year (her husband was working with a local foundation) and I sent my son twice a week for that year. She never really gave a diagnosis, but she did say that SHE didn't feel he was on the AS...she also said that "processing disorders" were such a new series of problems that the "disorder community" was really split between pro and con. I didn't feel there was any great improvement with the therapist. He was getting better before she came, he made some observable progress while she was here and he's continued to improve since she left. I have been his primary "speech therapist" for most of his life. (8+yrs)

    I've gotten some "good" vitamins that he started about a month ago. We started the brain integration therapy last week and I just bought the "fish oil" supplements that we will start when they arrive in a week or so. We started T4L about mid-August. He doesn't LOVE it but he will do it if I sit with him. He does not resist the supplemental "pages" that I give him....if I go away and let him do them ALONE. (???????)

    I am committed to these 4 things (plus my supplimental "pages" and hands-on activities) for the next calendar year. At best, all of these things will help my son move forward in the acacemic world; at worst they won't do him any harm. As a mother of a special child I believe I understand your concerns. Again, I meant no insult or denigration to either you or your child. I want to do everything I can for my son........including not allowing him to be either labelled or mislabelled.

    I have been teaching for 45 years. I am not a "special ed" teacher. My areas of expertise are literacy, second language acquisition and student advocacy. I have worked with a lot of kids. Some were so bright they hurt your eyes. Most were just regular kids; meaning that they were bright, able and willing to learn and, for the last 15yrs the only real learning challenge(s) many faced were a) that English was not their first language and b) (very often) there was no English speaking person at home who could assist the child with English language acquisition. Also very often, (in public school) the parents had little formal education in Spanish and so could not help much in the first language either. I'm sure that over the course of my life that there have been more than few "special" kids; unassessed, unlabelled, unsupported by special programs who wound up in my class(es). I've always tried to treat ALL of my students as if they're gifted....because they all are in one way or another.

    I believe there are a multitude of reasons for the drastic increase in children diagnosed with learning challenges. Being bombarded with various elctronic media from birth, diets full of fat and sugar, families who struggle to make ends meet (whether single parent , two working parents, grandparent(s) raising a second family; public/private schools and teachers who are overwhelmed and under appreciated. Then there's that whole vacinations debate.

    With all the medical advances and research into brains and learning styles we still know so little about how it all works. I am fundamentally against drugging children. At the same time, I know that there are no doubt drug protocols that are a huge benefit for some. I'm sure there are many professional and paraprofessional people out there who are doing wonderful things and helping lots of children. I am still very wary of doctors and people whose job it is to find something wrong. I have strong feelings and opinions on lots of different things but I try to keep an open mind and maintain a willingness to listen to other points of view.

    At the end of the day, I can only try to make the best decisions I can for my own child. I shall endeavor to make future posts more clear in a sincere effort to foster better communication........deni............
    deni may ............
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    Default Re: Report on Autism....did you see this???

    Quote Originally Posted by SahmIam



    Even with better diagnostic criteria, less knowlegeable doctors may sometimes misdiagnose behaviors that stem from other disorders, which left untreated cause the children to seem autistic-like. There is a metabolic disorder, such as the one that McCarthy's son likely has, which can be controlled with a CFGF diet. In that case, the children aren't autistic, but that's an accidental misdiagnosis, not treachery of the government. That is why the average autism diagnosis take months if not years. It is a combination of medical history, observation, and other testing with a variety of individuals. There may be some doctors quick to diagnose, but there are many more who aren't. Being diagnosed as autistic can be a blessing and a curse because it gives a parent much sought-after answers, but can also still be a stigma.

    g.

    Melissa,

    So in your opinion then McCarthy's son Evan didn't/doesn't have Autism? He has something else that was misdiagnosed? You believe that it wasn't that his Autism was caused by another source, as Autism could be caused by different sources, not just a single one? I hope I am explaining this right.
    Adria
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    Bryanna 13
    Ralphy 7
    Coleman 5
    GraceAnn 3

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    Default Re: Report on Autism....did you see this???

    Adria..........It's been a long time since I read her first book (and I've not yet read the most recent book but I do want to as soon as I have the $$) so I'm not totally sure I can recount her journey precisely accurately.

    If I remember correctly, her son was born completely "normal" and was developing normally until he was about 3-4yrs old and had a series of vaccinations. Then he became kind of disconnected and suddenly began having seizures. There were several trips to the ER resulted over several months I believe.

    Eventually he was diagnosed with epilepsy and treated with epilepsy meds. His seizures stopped, but he developed other symptoms, memory problems, repetitive behaviours, lack of affection, no eye contact, etc.

    She went to many doctors and finally got a diagnosis of autism.

    There are three reccommended therapies; physical, occupational...and I'm not sure of the third...maybe speech.

    She mortgaged her house to pay for these therapies because she could only get on 'waiting lists' for the free services that I believe are offerred through the school system. The wait lists were up to 2-3years long and all resources say that the younger the child is when he gets this therapy, the more effective the therapy seems to be.

    After several months (with therapy at home) her son got into a program at UCLA. While waiting for his sessions to end, she connected with other mother's whose children were also in the therapy program. One group was very actively researching autism; causes, treatments, alternative treatments, ect. and they shared the information they found.

    Jenny joined in the researching and she found the controversy over vaccines. She also found out about the gluten-free diet. She took her son to a specialist in San Diego who tested her son for yeast and he told her that the level of yeast in her son was equal to that found in advanced stage Aids patients. Her son was treated for that and continues on a maintenance program. She also took her son to an eye specialist in Texas....and I don't remember exactly what he did; glasses or therapy or both maybe.

    She feels very strongly that the gluten-free diet and the purging of the excess yeast and whatever the eye doctor did, combined to give her back the son she had before all of his problems began.

    There is no (medically accepted) "cure" for Autism. Jenny and the parents who believe as she does, refer to their children as "recovered."

    Was he misdiagnosed?? He was certainly misdiagnosed whith epilepsy. Who knows how the treatment for that affected him. He no longer has seizures and takes no seizure medication.

    Was he misdiagnosed as Autistic? Who knows?? Is he "recovered" or cured?? Who knows?? He evidently no longer presents with any autistic symptoms.

    Jenny does not claim any medical expertize, nor does she claim or promise that what she's done with her son will have the same effect on any other child. She tells her story and she offers sources for research, doctors, and the gluten-free diet she follows. One caveat; She writes like she talks and unfortunately she uses a fair amount of profanity, including the "f" word. I feel it detracts from her story and I'm hopeful that her editor managed to temper this in her most recent book. If you can get past the swear words, I think it's a book worth reading. just my 20 cents worth.....deni...
    deni may ............
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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

    http://www.currclick.com/?affiliate_id=15313

  10. #10
    adria2328 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    252

    Default Re: Report on Autism....did you see this???

    I have read both Jenny's books. I am glad for all the work she has done to get more information out there regarding Autism. (I also love her straight forward approach, including the f-word! lol) What I was trying to understand was if Melissa thought Jenny's son Evan was misdiagnosed having Autsim since her has since "recovered". Like does his "recovery" mean he didn't have Autism?

    My DD 11 has Epilepsy. But only has that diagnosis due to the repetitiveness of the seizures. Not because we know what causes them. Our neuro explained it that the diagnosis of Epilepsy is just due to the frequency of the seizures, not what may be causing them. We have no idea why my DD has them. They began after her last dose of MMR. She was misdiagnosed with "Night Terrors" for almost 2 years until I finally saw her stiffen her arms on evening, told the doc, which then caused her to run an EEG. Do I think her MMR caused them. Yes I do. There is nothing in our family history or any other physical ailment to have otherwise brought them about. The MMR was the *only outside source brought in. She takes meds for Epilepsy and ADD. I also had things set up for my DD to have testing done to see if she falls within the Autism spectrum. Once I pulled her from school I canceled the tests. I don't need her labeled. I know there are things she does differently that others and that's ok with me. Anywho, what I was thinking is that a child may be diagnosed Autistic due to symptoms caused by something else but still be Autistic due to those symptoms. Like my DD she still has Epilepsy even though we don't know the cause, and if we find the cause doesn't change the fact she is Epilepsy now. And since we don't know the cause of Autism couldn't there be more than one?
    Adria
    Mommy of 4
    Bryanna 13
    Ralphy 7
    Coleman 5
    GraceAnn 3

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