Sensory Processing Disorder
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  1. #1
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    Default Sensory Processing Disorder

    Quote from yahoo group private: sensoryhomeschool 1/16/06
    Sensory Processing Dysfunction (SPD) or Sensory Integration Disorder (SID)

    To those that are not familiar with me my name is Terri. We have been homeschooling now for 5 years. My husband John and I have 2 beautiful girls. Our youngest is now 5y/o and was diagnosed with SPD at age 3. At age 4 she was diagnosed as gifted and expressive speech delay.

    I have been keeping up with the posts but I have not really had time to reply until now. I know that sometime back some of you were talking about ways to home-school and ideas as to what to do. There are so many ways that you can home-school but I think sometimes that it is a little more challenging with a child with SPD. My oldest child now 11y/o seemed to be a breeze but I have had such a time trying to just "grab" the youngest's attention and spark her interest in any way possible.

    I have spent many hours looking around trying to find something that would help me and my children so that we might attempt to get the best of both worlds. LOL


    We have started a program called Time4learning. We found it at http://www.time4learning.com/ it is on-line learning program that goes up to 8th grade. It has been absolutely wonderful. We are starting our 3rd week this week and both my children love it. Instead of fighting with the youngest to attempt to do anything at all, she asks first thing in the morning to do her "school work" and I have to make her take a break. It is so animated and tells the child what to do with each step. They have it set up so that as each lesson is finished the icon, which is a star, twirls as she has completed it. This has increased her self esteem which had been lacking. I can not say that it will be this way with all children and to be honest I was a little sceptic about it working for her. They had a 2 wk trial period so I thought what the heck it is worth a try. We plan on keeping it because it is grabbing her attention and keeping it. She is learning academically and her expressive speech has been improving as well. Her eye hand coordination has gotten better from using the mouse and her listening skills have also improved because the program tells her what to do and then shows her how to do it. I do stay near her so that I can see what she is doing and sometime throw in my own stuff but it has helped me to not have so much scheduling, grading, and logging. I am really excited about the program and all that it entails.If I have a question and send them a quick email my question is answered relatively fast and they have even called me afterward to see if my issue was resolved. I am now finding more time to do some of those things that we always say we want to do in home school but never seem to find the time. I am also interested in how it might work for other children with SPD issues.

    Some of the things I have set up for her while doing her lessons is I allow her to swivel the chair back and forth and she always has a stress ball in her hand. As long as she fidgets she seems to do much better. They do sell fidgets at some of the on-line stores but I find that most anything can be a fidget it you think about it.

  2. #2
    Lisa333 is offline Member Regular
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    I know Time4Learning collects information about children with different special needs and how they use Time4Learning.

    They seem to be looking for guidance to help other parents with info on what works for what type of children and what doesn't. They have a page on sensory processing syndrome.

  3. #3
    MarilynM is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Sensory Integration Disorder is fascinating to me. My son has had the diagnosis for many years and I attended a seminar regarding this issue in 2001. I would love to attend another one! I am having to really work to change to the "new" name. It was called Sensory Integration Dysfunction when I first became educated about it and later changed to Disorder. I do see how the acronym was confusing with SIDS.

    Although a huge majority, if not all, of developmental pediatricians do not believe it exists, I have seen the therapy work for my son.

    Swinging and other therapy has helped him over the years, but his interaction on a horse has proven the best for him.

    My son participated in Hippo Therapy for years and has been in Therapeutic Riding for four or five years. The former utilizes side-walkers who hold on to the child. The later is independent riding with an instructor nearby.

    This is one area of Sensory Integration Therapy that is very effective. My son has Speech Apraxia and speech was the first change we saw in him. We would leave therapy and he would jabber away for hours. We are now seeing that the therapy has a longer carry-over affect and that is exciting.

    Since I believe that all special needs children have SID/SPD to some extent, I encourage all parents to research Hippo Therapy/ Therapeutic Riding for their children/teens/adults. I believe in it so much that I've done several interviews about it. My son will be participating through his adult years, also. He's now 15.

  4. #4
    MarilynM is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    I really appreciate Dr. Jean Ayres and her pioneer work in this area. Her book, Sensory Integration and the Child has a great analogy: "Good sensory processing enables all the impulses to flow easily and reach their destination quickly. Sensory integrative dysfunction is a sort of `traffic jam' in the brain. Some bits of sensory information get `tied up in traffic,' and certain parts of the brain do not get the sensory information they need to do their jobs." (Ayres, p. 51).

    Isn't that rich? She describes sensory information as food for the brain similar to the food which nourishes our physical bodies. Difficulty in processing and organizing sensory information causes dysfunction which can be compared to indigestion which occurs when the digestive tract malfunctions.

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