Son with Aspergers Struggles with Worksheets
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Thread: Son with Aspergers Struggles with Worksheets

  1. #1
    write4myboys is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Son with Aspergers Struggles with Worksheets

    Hi, all! I am new to Time 4 Learning, and homeschooling my 6 year old son. I have found that while he excels with the computer-based format of T4L, I am struggling horribly with motivating him to do anything on paper. I have workbooks that I have been using to reinforce information from the lessons, but I feel like every time we sit down to work on them, he starts staring into space, playing with his pencil, fidgeting, and doing anything and everything other than doing the work.

    I feel as though I am constantly nagging at him to finish his worksheets, and I just don't want his homeschooling to be this way. I've tried starting the day with them, ending the day with them, sprinkling them throughout the day, it makes no difference. Once he gets the pencil in his hand, it's all over. He wants nothing to do with it.

    Anybody else with this type of experience? Any suggestions? Maybe he doesn't need the worksheets? Maybe I'm just being too old-school about it and not shaking my preconceptions? How else can I reinforce writing skills? I know that I can reinforce the concepts with him just through talking to him, but what about those motor skills for writing? Any advice would be GREATLY appreciated - I am at such a loss.

  2. #2
    TNAutismBorden is offline Junior Member
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    Yes, we have similar issues. My daughter is PDD-NOS and non-verbal. When I can I use supports for the worksheets. As in colors. Color the correct answer color x- her choice- and color the others color y. Other ideas are to make two copies of worksheets then cut and paste because she likes the cutting and pasting and keeps her involved. I use a magnetic board with magnetic scrabble letters for spelling or unscramble letters. The worksheets with mainly writing creatively are tougher. I may queue her with options from a previous worksheet or days work. And help her write very short sentences.We are on 1st grade level currently.

  3. #3
    suzi42 is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    I am new to home schooling my Asperger's son as well. He is 13 but tested on a 4th grade level. Right now we are simply working on the computer lessons. I am not adding worksheets right now because it reminds him of public school and for him that is very negative. I say just take it one day at a time and follow your child's lead. You don't want to frustrate or make them upset with home schooling. It needs to be a positive experience for both of you. I have a degree in Early Childhood Education and worksheets are not for every child. No worries if you need to be worksheet free. Hope you have a wonderful day!
    MominTexas likes this.

  4. #4
    write4myboys is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Thank you both for the feedback! I feel much better to hear that it's really okay to NOT do worksheets if they don't work. I guess for me, it's kind of that shred of traditional indicators of grasping concepts. I am thinking about creating electronic worksheets, since he excels so much with the computer, the tablet, and other electronics. I guess it really IS just about finding what works for him to ensure that he's getting it. Thanks again!!!

  5. #5
    Carissa Robinson is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    I am a teacher and I have worked with a student who has Aspergers at the high school level. He did not like doing the worksheets either. He liked doing podcasts to demonstrate knowledge and using computers in general. From what I have gathered research has shown that iPads and computers are great for students with Autism Spectrum.
    A scrabble board board may be a good alternative to worksheets for spelling. Using sticks with beans glued on, ranging from 1-9 or 1-5, may work as an alternative to math worksheets.
    Also try motivation such as "if you can do this for 10 minutes I will then let you play your favorite game". Gradually increase the increments overtime.
    I encourage you to look beyond worksheets and use digital methods if he likes them. There is more to life than worksheets and test, though they are good prep for paper work. Support Creativity and individuality.

  6. #6
    Melissa55 is offline Junior Member
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    Hi, I have an 8 year old son with high functioning autism. He also doesn't enjoy worksheets. I motivate him by letting him have a short break with his favorite activity after completing his worksheet(s). The activitiy is usually a stimming one (small windmill, hand held fan, clocks) etc. When he was in an autism program (IBI) the teacher would give him a piece of a gear (highly motivating for him at the time) after he handed in each worksheet. By the end of the day, he had all the pieces he needed to get the screwdriver and build the gear and play with it for 5 minutes or so before the bus came. I think it is all about what motivates our kids to do things that they are not motivated to do in the same way typically developing kids are. Good luck!!

  7. #7
    MistyRae is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    I'm new to T4L as well. In fact, my son will be starting tomorrow so I'm not 100% familiar with how this works yet. Where I live, a portfolio with work samples are a requirement of the state. My son doesn't tolerate the sensation of using a pencil or pen of any kind for long periods of time. Your opinion is to not worry about being worksheet free, but how would someone who needs to have work samples deal with this issue? When I was lesson planning on my own, I created worksheets in word then had him highlight the correct answers or type his response then save it into a digital portfolio.

  8. #8
    write4myboys is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    MistyRae,

    I am not sure if Kentucky actually requires worksheets as part of the portfolio, or if you can use the gradebook that is available through the parent portal. Time4Learning provides you with visibility to all of your son's grades, and even allows you to pull grade reports. Maybe this, paired with some art-style projects, might be enough?

  9. #9
    write4myboys is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Also, I have found that, for my son at least, his workbook pages seem to be much easier if I sit him down with those first, and only have him do 2 separate pages per day. So, we pick one subject each day to do worksheets from, and he does 2 pages first thing in the morning. Then, he gets to log in to the computer for his T4L lessons.

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    Write4myboys!!! I am sooooo feeling your pain right now. I to have a daughter who is almost 6 years old, and loves T4L, she has almost completed level one preschool in 2 days. She will work on it on her own. I have been a homeschooler for 4 years now, and have even worked with a special education teacher who is also a dear friend of mine, trying to homeschool her. I have 3 folders full of worksheets that I have laminated and she can use dry erase markers on them so she can continuously reuse them, but she just has no interest whatsoever in doing the worksheets, but she can rock on her laptop with T4L, She is also signed into ABC Mouse, and even though it is a good site, it is nothing like T4L, she enjoys changing her avatars clothes more than doing the lessons on ABC MOuse. That is what I really like about T4L, it is sooo at her level, but it is all about education, no bologny to distract her. Her two sisters are schooled the old fashioned way with textbooks, pencils, and paper, which is what I enjoy doing, they learn better that way, but sissy is having no part of it, so learning is learning, and if she learns better with T4L then that is what I will do, the pencil to paper will come later I am sure. As far a writing goes, I had a therapist recommend a wonderful curriculum to me for special kids called "Handwriting without Tears." you might want to try looking into that, it might help. I am going to order it for sissy in a couple months when I feel she is ready to try it. good luck, and I hope I have helped a little, if there is any way I can help, please do not hesitate to let me know.

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