Specials Needs Daughter
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  1. #1
    sunriver is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Specials Needs Daughter

    Hi everyone, my name is Karrie and I just started homeschooling my daughter this past August. My daughter is 15, failed the 4th and 8th grades, and since age 7 diagnosed with ADHD, ADD, Bipolar Disorder, and Asperger's syndrome. That in itself is a lot to deal with, but my daughter has given up on herself and doesn't believe she is capable of being successful. I attribute this to the constant failure in school, with teachers giving up and the constant bullying from her peers. I am desperately trying to turn this around for, but it's hard to undo these past 10 years of school. I'm using a combination of Time4Learning, Saxton Math, and was even able to get the Civics and Social Studies books from her former school. It seems no matter how many different methods I have used over the years, she just cannot memorize her multiplication tables. Believe me, I have tried it all. Short-term memory is a real issue with her. Does anyone have any suggestions that might help me help her to memorize her multiplication tables? Thank you very much in advance.

    Karrie

  2. #2
    meredithgloria is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Karrie, First of all (((hugs))) I have an 11 year old son who was just diagnosed yesterday with Bipolar, Asperger's and Turrets-we have been waiting for a diagnosis for the last three years. I actually homeschool my 7 year old daughter who is as of yet not diagnosed but has some "issues". She can not memorize charts, addition, subtraction whatever and when I really looked at it why does she need to? Now this is just my own opinion here but I myself never learned the tables and I am a math wiz, memorization is just not a strength of mine. Memorizing something doesn't mean you have learned to do it. So if she can do the multiplication the question is, is it important to YOU that she memorize it? If it is then by all means don't give up; but just because it is the standard in school to do something does not mean that it has to be done.

    Meredith

  3. #3
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    SHayMitch is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunriver View Post
    Hi everyone, my name is Karrie and I just started homeschooling my daughter this past August. My daughter is 15, failed the 4th and 8th grades, and since age 7 diagnosed with ADHD, ADD, Bipolar Disorder, and Asperger's syndrome. That in itself is a lot to deal with, but my daughter has given up on herself and doesn't believe she is capable of being successful. I attribute this to the constant failure in school, with teachers giving up and the constant bullying from her peers. I am desperately trying to turn this around for, but it's hard to undo these past 10 years of school. I'm using a combination of Time4Learning, Saxton Math, and was even able to get the Civics and Social Studies books from her former school. It seems no matter how many different methods I have used over the years, she just cannot memorize her multiplication tables. Believe me, I have tried it all. Short-term memory is a real issue with her. Does anyone have any suggestions that might help me help her to memorize her multiplication tables? Thank you very much in advance.

    Karrie
    ADHD and education is a hard mixture specially if she is going to a "normal school".. You should try to enroll her in an alternative school because their individual needs will be attended. There will be proper assessment on every student and they will be involved in the planning process and hopefully will be able to solve whatever stress/crisis they are in. With regards to memorization, you should create a positive learning environment at home so there is a continuous educational process.
    Last edited by SHayMitch; 02-23-2012 at 07:52 PM.

  4. #4
    jpenn's Avatar
    jpenn is offline Senior Member
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    Hello Karrie and Meredith! My DD is 14 and has the same issues minus the Asperger DX. We have tried public school, private school, and homeschool since she was old enough to attend school. Homeschooling is the only answer for us. She tried PS again this year for 8th grade (we held her back one year thinking it would give her an advantage--NOT). She wanted to go, so we agreed to let her try. She was o.k. except for the massive homework, that I really don't think was even necessary. Her grades were o.k. for the most part. She did have problems with trying to copy from the board, keeping up in class, and the noise levels. When she started having panic attacks because she didn't think she was going to get enough sleep (she had to ride the bus an hour to and from school--up at 5:30am and home by 4:00pm) if we went somewhere on a school night, it was just too much. Besides all that, she only had one hour of freedom a day. When she got home from school at 4:00, she had one hour to herself and the rest of the night was spent doing homework. That's just too much for any kid.

    T4L works much better than public school.
    Joyfully,
    Jackie

  5. #5
    dada1111 is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Hi Karrie I also have a special needs daughter

    Hi Karrie I also have a special needs daughter who has a TBI. She is in a wheelchair and has had many problems with school. She went to regular school thru the 8th grade and had a full time aide but she could not read or write at all. After the 8th grade I pulled her and decided to home school her. I signed her up with Connections Academy thru an IEP and sat down and devoted a few hours a day of my time to be her tutor and she learned very fast that way. She did 4 years in Connections and then they booted her out but by then she could read and write some. Then for almost 2 years I paid out of my pocket and she attended Time4learning.com online and finally got bored and decided to quit about a year ago. A couple of weeks ago she asked if she could start school again and this very morning she again started Time4learning and I will pay for it out of my pocket as she really enjoys it. She will never learn enough to pass any sort of a college entrance test but she sure is proud of what she can do and her multiplication is not very good but who cares as long as she is happy with what she can do well. Relax and dont worry so much and it will all work out. Tom & Ashley Hayes

  6. #6
    msheilman is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    I have a four year old homeschooling now and future, and she also has issues of her own. However, I'm not speaking from that experience. I am also an educator at college level, and I have worked with adult learners with memory issues such as this. I have two thoughts on this.

    First, you mentioned her not having many successes. All learners deal with this whether they have serious learning issues or not. I teach writing, and lack of confidence is a real killer when it comes to learning! So I mix feedback. If there is a negative feedback to offer, I make sure there is also something positive. My little one, for example, couldn't spell her name in correct order this morning, but she got the first half right the second time, so we worked from that. Now she can get the first three letters right--at least today And she's really proud of that. It helps her be less discouraged. If I'm grading a paper, I make sure I also point out strengths. It helps just to know you (the learner) are at least doing something right. Success leads to more and other success.

    I also had a student once with a truly mind boggling memory issue. If she learned something in class on a certain day, she remembered it till she left class. The next day--no idea. Didn't even remember learning it the day before. She was seeing specialists and working on developing her memory skills, but I wasn't qualified to help with that beyond what they suggested I do, which was repetition. Another mother pointed out, however, that it might not be necessary to memorize, and since repetition just didn't work for that student, I went with the other mother's point. I didn't ask her to memorize. Instead, I asked her to start adding resources to her notebook. We added spelling pages, quick reference grammar reminders, and tools such as outlining templates. Rather than teach her to memorize rules, I taught her to remember bringing her resource binder, and we organized the binder so that she didn't have to remember where each resource was. She didn't have to memorize spellings. Instead, she learned to use her resource binder and dictionaries and so on. Would it be appropriate in your situation to create such a binder for your daughter? Maybe you could start a binder with a multiplication quick reference card first?

  7. #7
    jpenn's Avatar
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    dada1111, if you pay quarterly or yearly, you get a discount. Also, not sure if you know this or not, but if you are going to need a month or so off, you can put your account on hold so you don't loose anything. I think the "on hold" is about $4 for a month.
    Joyfully,
    Jackie

  8. #8
    jpenn's Avatar
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    Karrie,

    My daughter has tremendous trouble memorizing her facts. I don't know why I didn't mention this before, but I have my daughter answer X facts using a calculator. She is required to say the problem as she keys it in the calculator, and she has to say the answer when she sees it on the calculator. Using more than one sense is key here. It truly does help them remember the facts. She is a point where she now answers all the ones she has memorized by using the calculator first and has me check it, then she goes back and uses the calculator to answer the rest. Try that and see if it helps. There have actually been studies done on this and they are favorable.
    Joyfully,
    Jackie

  9. #9
    reb621's Avatar
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    Wow, all great ideas! Here's what is helping my short-term memory issues gal (14-yr-old) with all of her math facts (incl. addition and subtraction): Timez Attack! We love this free game and my average 4th grader was able to "teach herself" her mult/div facts. For my delayed 7th grader, it's harder, but she's getting there. (NOTE: The addition/subtraction is only available as a Beta right now, and you have to e-mail their contact person to get it.)

    And it's fun and cute.

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