Is TFL a fit for a math and reading disabled child?
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  1. #1
    AnninNY is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Is TFL a fit for a math and reading disabled child?

    I've homeschooled my 11-yr-old adopted daughter from day one. She was born with fetal alcohol syndrome and struggles with short term memory problems, numerical concepts, and decoding in reading. I had her tested last year by the school district who told me she would definitely be placed in a special ed. class if enrolled. She is doing pretty well in Saxon math 2 though she still struggles with subtraction. I've also used Semple Math with her. In reading, she is in a 3rd grade reader but progressing. What's this I hear about a parrot who can help the student read on-screen messages? I've also considered using audio books to help her learn because she's an auditory learner.

    If anyone has a situation similar to mine or if anyone can help me know if TFL is for my dd, please post. Thanks so much.

  2. #2
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    In the lower grades, lessons require little reading. From third grade on, Peedy the Parrot is available to read text to your student. He does have a "robot" sounding voice, which some students find difficult to understand.

    The best way to know is to take advantage of the risk-free trial. You can use Time4Learning for two weeks. If you cancel within that period of time, you will not be charged.

    Here are a couple of links about using Time4Learning as special education:

    http://www.time4learning.com/special-education.shtml

    http://www.time4learning.com/learning-s ... eeds.shtml

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  3. #3
    ergon4 is offline Member Regular
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    So glad to see you considering T4L for your daughter. It has been an incredibly positive experience for our son. He has Anxiety/OCD and dyslexia, and T4L has a lot of tools that have helped him with various difficulties. The Peedy the Parrot is very helpful when a lesson needs to be read to your child, although if I am really concerned about him comprehending everything he is reading, I just read the passages aloud to him myself. The graphic organizer program within the writing assignments is very helpful too, especially if your child is a visual learner. There are wonderful on-board math tools (almost like virtual manipulatives) that can help with making sense of the math lessons, although they are pretty self-explanatory already. I agree with the suggestion of giving the program a two-week trial. I think you will find that this is a wonderful program for any child with learning challenges. Good luck!

    Kerry

    Just noticed an article on homeschooling children with special needs.
    Raising homegrown geeks...one laptop at a time. Check out my Topsy-Techie blog at http://topsytechie.wordpress.com/

  4. #4
    dad3n1 is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default RE: Is TFL a fit for a math and reading disabled child?

    YES! Something I do a bit differently is that I repeat lessons - A LOT! My dd is almost 10. She was alcohol exposed, and I personally think it affected certain memories. For example, one day she can tell you all her multiples of 3, and the next day not know what 3 + 3 equals. So, I'll go through a lesson for a while. The next day, I go through it again. The same lesson. I've found that on Quizzes, if you repeat them, their questions differ, so that helps, too. With memory problems, it's probably a good thing that they can repeat the same lessons. It's like going to see the same movie for the third time. You see something each time that you missed the time before.
    Also, since T4L is great about keeping the child's attention, they can understand better. The greatest benefit, though, is how they explain things so clearly. Sometimes I think she'll never catch on to something, but when she learns it on T4L, it's expressed differently, and the light bulbs start going on!

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