What to Do? Child May Have Dyslexia
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  1. #1
    PreciousPitty is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default What to Do? Child May Have Dyslexia

    She has a hard time STILL with always mixing up 2 and 5, like say the clock (digital) says 2:45pm she'll say its 5:42. There also some other things ive noticed besides the dislexia like she will still skip T in the Alphabet and mix up 13 14 15, please help I don't want her to be behind.

    The thing that worries me is from the age of 2 - 5 she had a unbelievable memory, and at the age of 5 I noticed a huge drop in her memory, and she has a really hard time still.

  2. #2
    Mandy in TN is offline Senior Member
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    If your mommy gut says something is wrong, then definitely take her in for testing.
    Mandy
    ds Doodlebug 11yo
    currently homeschooling with an eclectic mess of stuff

    homeschool graduates:
    ds Cashew 20yo
    ds Peanut 22yo

  3. #3
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    jpenn is offline Senior Member
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    It is not unusual for a 7 year old to mix up numbers and letters, however, it sounds like you have a little more going on. I agree with Mandy, I would have a specialist see her. Keep in mind, even if she is dyslexic (my DD is), dyslexic folks are quite bright and very creative! There is always a sliver lining somewhere.

    I am going to suggest you post this in the "Special Needs" forum since this forum is really for posting about supplemental resources. I think you will get more responses in that forum. Maybe some folks there can share their experiences with you.

    Keep us posted on how things go.
    Last edited by jpenn; 10-28-2011 at 11:36 PM.
    Joyfully,
    Jackie

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    msheilman is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    We have a similar problem. My four year old writes everything backward. She spells everything backward, and she tries to write from right to left instead ofthe other way around! Someone has suggested going to the Special Needs forum, and I will try that. She is also currently in a headstart program, and they have said that the problem will just "work itself out" as someone here also suggested. However, if it continues much longer I will seek specialized assistance. I'm certainly not equipped to cope with this particular issue! I'm also hoping that this program will help with that. She argued at length with me this morning that the program was wrong when it spelled her name in the correct order. So I'm going to add a few more of those spelling drag-n-drops to her lessons. Maybe seeing words in correct order more often will help?

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    msheilman, you might want to take a look at one of our sister sites, VocabularySpellingCity. It is free to use.
    Joyfully,
    Jackie

  6. #6
    Mandy in TN is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by msheilman View Post
    We have a similar problem. My four year old writes everything backward. She spells everything backward, and she tries to write from right to left instead ofthe other way around! Someone has suggested going to the Special Needs forum, and I will try that. She is also currently in a headstart program, and they have said that the problem will just "work itself out" as someone here also suggested. However, if it continues much longer I will seek specialized assistance. I'm certainly not equipped to cope with this particular issue! I'm also hoping that this program will help with that. She argued at length with me this morning that the program was wrong when it spelled her name in the correct order. So I'm going to add a few more of those spelling drag-n-drops to her lessons. Maybe seeing words in correct order more often will help?
    As I said in the previous post, if you feel like something is wrong, have it checked. However, most evaluators will want to wait until a child is 7yo before doing a psycho-educational evaluation.

    At 4yo I would not be concerned unless there is a family history of dyslexia. Here is why: to a 4yo a teacup is a teacup no matter which way you turn it- even if you turn it upside-down. Then, we show them a circle and a line and tell them that depending on how they are positioned you can have a b, d, p, or q. It is not uncommon for a 4yo to not grasp this concept.

    You are very correct in saying that spelling is sequential. You can have the correct letters, but if they are not in the correct order from left to right then the word is spelled incorrectly. There are two spelling programs (that I know of) that really work from this perspective: Phonetic Zoo and Sequential Spelling. Phonetic Zoo takes a phonetic approach. For some dyslexics phonics makes no sense. They either can't hear or see phonemes. Sequential Spelling shows how words are built without a phonetic approach. Both of these are easily implemented at home. However, if you are wanting to research working with dyslexics, look into Orton-Gillingham methods. Some of this is expensive and may be more difficult to implement at home or without some training, but it is certainly worth looking into.

    Some suggestions:
    If she writes with her right hand, place her left hand on the left edge of the paper to hold it in place. Explain that she should begin writing by the hand that is not holding the pencil. If she does her written work at a desk, place a piece of blue painters tape on the left side of the desk. Explain that she should begin writing on the same side of the paper as the tape.

    Find an old wooden puzzle and use the rough wooden back or purchase sand paper and have her "write" with her pointer finger and middle fingers. Use both fingers at once extending them from the hand as if they are a writing implement. This will imprint the information into her brain more than writing with a pencil. With sand paper you can tape the paper to the table and have her trace letters or letter combinations with her fingers that you have written. While she is tracing the letter, have her make the letter sound. Be sure that she traces left to right and top to bottom. So, she would trace m while saying <m>, sl while saying <sl>, ch while saying <ch>, ai while saying <A> and so on. Also, for what it's worth, upper case letters are easier to distinguish than lower case, so you could begin with the upper case alphabet.

    She can also air write with her entire arm. Stand holding your entire arm stiff in front of you like your entire arm is a giant writing implement. Using the larger muscle groups in your arm will imprint the information into her brain more than writing with a pencil. Stand (or sit on the floor so that she can mimic you more easily) beside her and air write. Say the letter sounds rather than the letter names. <b> <a> <t> bat

    HTH-
    Mandy
    Last edited by Mandy in TN; 01-04-2012 at 07:47 PM.
    ds Doodlebug 11yo
    currently homeschooling with an eclectic mess of stuff

    homeschool graduates:
    ds Cashew 20yo
    ds Peanut 22yo

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