how essential are the decodable books
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  1. #1
    Janet is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default how essential are the decodable books

    We joined back in late winter/early spring. My son is 12 with down syndrome. We started at the K level to initiate him into the T4L way to do things also as a tool to see if there were any gaps or areas needing review.

    All is going o.k. We do about 3 lessons a day in LA or Math. On areas that he has trouble (money) I repeat lessons and or do things off the computer to further learning.

    My question is that he is very slow in reading. We are almost finished with K LA EXCEPT for reading the decodable books. We are still on Sam and Dad (2nd book) I printed it out, we review all the new words daily. How important are these books, can we go on to 1st gr and still continue reading these books ? Or are they essential to read before we progress to 1st gr. Or should I just forget reading and do another reading program altogether?

    Thanks
    Janet in AZ

  2. #2
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Learning to read phonetically is sometimes a challenge for children with Down syndrome. It is often suggested that they master many sight words first, before progressing to phonics instruction. Have you read Teaching Reading to Children with Down Syndrome? It's the bottom book on this page. Using this method, my three-year-old (who has Down syndrome) recognizes four words on flashcards. (We started with two and are adding more gradually.)

    The ability to skip around and choose appropriate lessons is one of the reasons Time4Learning is a good choice for students with special needs. To progress to the first grade phonics lessons, your son should master the kindergarten phonics lessons first. BUT, he can still try the first grade language arts lessons that teach high frequency words (what I call "sight words"). The language arts extensions are good to use for students who are not yet reading, as the program will read the selection aloud to the student.

    Love and Learning is a reading program specifically designed for children with Down syndrome. I started using this with my son when he was a newborn. He has recently shown interest in some of Time4Learning's preschool lessons.

    It sounds like you are doing a lot of supplementary things with your son, and I agree that it's beneficial to use a variety of media (computer, DVDs, audio CDs, books).

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  3. #3
    Janet is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    We do use the Teaching Reading to Children w DS. It is slow going with a sight word bank of about 75 words. Love and Learning was very, very long ago.

    He does know all the alphabet, sounds, match u to l case and initail and final letters in words by placing pic in those catagories. We are working on using letter tiles for short vowel words. He can blend some 3 letter words on his own.

    But as for actual reading...slow. Yes we had his eyes examined for visual and tracking issues.

    So does he actually need to be able to read the decodable books to continue to 1st gr phonics since he knows all the other components?

    Thanks for your input.

    Janet

  4. #4
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    The first grade phonics lessons aren't dependent on actually being able to read the kindergarten books, so he could move on to the first grade lessons and add to the phonemes he has mastered. There is even some review of sounds he already knows, so he might find encouragement in some early success.

    There are online books included in the first grade curriculum. The student can click on each word to hear them read aloud. It isn't essential that he be able to read them himself.

    The blending-together of sounds can be challenging. I think it's great that he can blend some three-letter words. That shows that he has the basic idea.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

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