Anybody using this for preschool?
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Godzgirl is offline Junior Member Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1

    Default Anybody using this for preschool?

    I will be starting to homeschool my daughter for preschool this coming month and was told about this website. Looks interesting and i'm thinking of signing up. But i was wondering if any of you mom's have or are using this particular ciriculum for your preschooler and if so how is it working out for you?

  2. #2
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    OR
    Posts
    6,894
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    I am using it for four of my six children and for my nephew. One of my daughters was a preschooler last year. She loved being able to "do school" like her brothers and sisters. I liked being able to gradually advance her into the kindergarten program as she was ready.

    One thing I did was to read the online books in the preschool program aloud to her. Then, she went back and had the program read them to her a few times.

    I think it's important to also read a lot of library books to kids this age, and to give them opportunity to freely explore arts and crafts. Stock a box or basket with scissors, glue sticks, crayons, construction paper, and stickers. Throw in some of your more interesting "junk mail" as it arrives, and let her loose! You might show her how to cut pictures of animals out of magazines and glue all the dogs on one piece of paper and all the bird on another. Or, have her cut out pictures and put animals in one envelope, food in another envelope, clothing in another.

    The lesson plans give more ideas for hands-on activities to accompany Time4Learning's preschool program (which is called Playbox).

    This could be a great thread if other moms of preschoolers would post their ideas. I'm looking forward to seeing what others have been doing with their little ones!

    Have fun!

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  3. #3
    clopin0 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6

    Default

    My son will be 4 next month, and I've been using T4L with him since the end of June. He's currently working on the kindergarten level, and he absolutely LOVES it. He loves the animation and that each activity covers something different. I love the fact that he can now use the computer all by himself.

    I work 3 days a week, so he only works on it 2 or 3 times per week. When he does do his work, I have a hard time pulling him away (he will easily work for 2 hours-especially on his math). I also do supplemental worksheets and other activities with him.

    My one complaint about it so far is that it doesn't do much "teaching" at this level. Luckily, all of the material that he has covered so far, he pretty much knows already-he just enjoys doing the activities. If the material is new for your child, then you may want to preview the material and teach it to your child before doing the lesson. With the language arts lessons, they have a little bit of instruction time before questions are asked; however with the math, there is usually no instruction at all - just activities and questions. For example, in a lesson about directional words (above, below, behind, etc.), it assumed that children already knew the meaning of these words and just started asking questions such as "Move Sheldon behind the tree."

    I will continue using it because it certainly does reinforce skills that I'm already teaching him in a fun and innovative way. I'd much rather him do T4L for an hour than watch TV, and I think he would too!

  4. #4
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    OR
    Posts
    6,894
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    clopin0 . . . Thank for sharing how you're using Time4Learning.

    I thought the same thing about the lack of "teaching" at the lower level, until my daughter decided to get one wrong on purpose to "see what happened". I had placed her a little lower than she really needed to be, just to give her time to get accustomed to the program, and she hadn't gotten any wrong until then.

    The program actually waits until your child makes an error to do the teaching. If it says, "Move Sheldon behind the tree" and the child does just that, then it says, "Good! You moved Sheldon behind the tree!" If, however, the child moves Sheldon in front of the tree, the program will say, "You moved Sheldon IN FRONT OF the tree. Try again to move Sheldon BEHIND the tree." If they get it wrong again, the program will move Sheldon itself, highlight him in gold, and say, "THIS is BEHIND the tree. Sheldon is now BEHIND the tree."

    I'm kind of glad it tries to assess what the child knows first. My daughter would get tired of being "taught" concepts she already knew quite well, but she doesn't mind showing off what she already knows.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  5. #5
    MamaMary's Avatar
    MamaMary is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Fl
    Posts
    1,336
    Blog Entries
    8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hearthstone_academy
    clopin0 . . . Thank for sharing how you're using Time4Learning.

    I thought the same thing about the lack of "teaching" at the lower level, until my daughter decided to get one wrong on purpose to "see what happened". I had placed her a little lower than she really needed to be, just to give her time to get accustomed to the program, and she hadn't gotten any wrong until then.

    The program actually waits until your child makes an error to do the teaching. If it says, "Move Sheldon behind the tree" and the child does just that, then it says, "Good! You moved Sheldon behind the tree!" If, however, the child moves Sheldon in front of the tree, the program will say, "You moved Sheldon IN FRONT OF the tree. Try again to move Sheldon BEHIND the tree." If they get it wrong again, the program will move Sheldon itself, highlight him in gold, and say, "THIS is BEHIND the tree. Sheldon is now BEHIND the tree."

    I'm kind of glad it tries to assess what the child knows first. My daughter would get tired of being "taught" concepts she already knew quite well, but she doesn't mind showing off what she already knows.
    Oh Kelly! Now I'm gonna have to sign my youngest up! Your costing me money with wonderful explanations like that!
    Mary, Child of the King of Kings, Jesus Christ! Wife to best friend and Mama to her four boys 91, 96, 00, 02, Homeschooling since 1998! Come visit us on our blog! http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/MamaMary/

  6. #6
    clopin0 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6

    Default

    I now have to take back what I said about kindergarten math! My son just began the third unit (the safari unit) and the material is taught first before any questions are asked. The lessons are a lot more comprehensive and are also longer in length.

    I do have a question about the printable books for kindergarten language arts. What is the best way to use the readers? Should a child be able to read those alone or should they be read to the child? Also, is T4L a complete "learn to read" program?

  7. #7
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    OR
    Posts
    6,894
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    A child can learn to read using Time4Learning. It is as complete as any phonics or learn-to-read program that I've ever used. In addition, it is FUN, so the kids like doing it.

    I don't think any reading program can really be complete in and of itself, because children always do better with lots of practice. Sounding out words on signs, looking for familiar letters in magazines, and being read to A LOT all help a child gain and improve reading skills.

    Eventually, your child should be able to read the readers himself. If that doesn't happen right away, you read them aloud to him. Follow along with your finger and pause at the words you know your child will be able to sound out, letting him read those words. In this way, you will read the books together.

    Here is some more information on learning to read with Time4Learning. You might also be interested in the Reading Skills Pyramid and this information.

    I'm glad your son is enjoying kindergarten math. My youngest daughter finished K math last year. She learned a lot and can't understand why her friends say they don't like school.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •