I'm new- a little about us and then some questions
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    dgdg5150 is offline Junior Member Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    3

    Default I'm new- a little about us and then some questions

    Hi, my name is Debbie and I have one son who is 11. I was very excited when I found this website because I have decided to homeschool my son. I am a single parent and work full time, and I too attend school online, so this no doubt will be a challenge for me. I am here because I am fed up with the public school system. They just keep passing him every year and he has fallen behind horribly. I am no teacher so I'm looking for a curriculum to help him catch up. I'll try to not write a book here but I have several questions as this will be his whole curriculum. My son is behind horribly in reading, comprehension, spelling, handwriting and math. He should be starting the 6th grade this year. So where do I start him? If he gets ahead, do I bump him up a grade in the middle of the school year? Can we do different levels in different subjects? Do we end one year and then start with the next after summer like a traditional school? How long is the school day and is it all online? Do I need to be with him constantly or can some of it be self taught while I am at work? I am home off and on during my work day. And last, is there something to help me keep records as my state, (Missouri), has a law about us keeping records? I'm sorry so many questions but this really means a lot to me to have found this. I am really lost on where to start and need some help! Thanks a million for any help and advice. Debbie

  2. #2
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    OR
    Posts
    6,892
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default Re: I'm new- a little about us and then some questions

    Quote Originally Posted by dgdg5150
    So where do I start him? If he gets ahead, do I bump him up a grade in the middle of the school year? Can we do different levels in different subjects? Do we end one year and then start with the next after summer like a traditional school? How long is the school day and is it all online? Do I need to be with him constantly or can some of it be self taught while I am at work? I am home off and on during my work day. And last, is there something to help me keep records as my state, (Missouri), has a law about us keeping records?
    Hi, Debbie. Welcome!

    Keep in mind that Time4Learning is a curriculum, not a school.

    Time4Learning is a complete CORE curriculum. It covers math, language, science, and social studies. Most families at least add a separate handwriting program, daily required reading (student's choice of reading material), and daily writing (such as a journal entry). Many also include a typing program, foreign language study, art, music, or other enrichment programs.

    You may enroll your son in different levels for different subjects. This is very common. You will have easy access to one level above and one level below his enrollment level. If his lessons seem too easy or too hard, you will be able to try out the lessons on the other levels. If you want his enrollment level changed, you may request that at any time.

    Whether to follow a traditional school year or school throughout the summer is up to each individual family.

    Printable worksheets are available for some lessons. Some parents always use the printables. Some parents do not use them at all. Some choose to use the worksheets only if the student has difficulty with the online lesson.

    Homeschooling takes far less time than a group school situation. This is mostly because of "crowd control" issues. Your student will not need to wait in line for his turn to use the classroom microscope, take time to attend school assemblies, wait for other students to understand before proceeding with his work, etc. Few Time4Learning students spend more than two hours per day on their online lessons. The rest of the time can be spent on enrichment studies, reading, and so forth. My own family has chosen to not allow recreational television or computer time during the school day so that, even when the children are technically "finished" with their school work, they generally find something productive, healthy, or educational to do with their time: read, write, practice musical instruments, play board games, and climb on the monkey bars!

    It's nice if the child's tutor (you! ) can be available for questions when he is doing his lessons, but many working parents use Time4Learning successfully. If he gets stuck, he can move on to another subject and speak with you about the item needing clarification when you are available. Time4Learning does do much of the teaching for you. It is a great timesaver, motivating for the student, and can help students become more independent learners . . . but . . . just as you wouldn't hand a textbook to your son and say, "Go learn!", you will not want to be completely hands-off with his Time4Learning lessons.

    Here is some information on the kinds of reports and records that are kept. There are three pages, so click on the arrow at the top, right-hand side to read all of them.

    Do read all of the Hintsbefore getting started. We are happy to have you with us!

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  3. #3
    dgdg5150 is offline Junior Member Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    3

    Default Thanks for info.

    Thanks for the info. I wonder if anybody else from Missouri is using this program and can tell me how they keep track of their hours etc... I guess they have to do things outside of T4L to get the hours required by the state? You can reply here or reply and ask for my email or IM me on messenger if you don't want to be public with your advice. dgdg5150 on yahoo IM. Thanks, Debbie.

  4. #4
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    OR
    Posts
    6,892
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    Debbie, here are the laws that pertain to homeschooling in Missouri. Homeschooling does not appear to be highly regulated there.

    Here is a Time4Learning user's map. This only includes forum users who have taken time to place themselves on the map, but I see several in Missouri!

    Your state stipulates that 400 of the required 1000 hours take place at the student's "regular school setting" (usually home). Approximately 2 hours a day with Time4Learning takes care of that part.

    Your state requires a little over 5 1/2 hours of school per day. No online or traditional curriculum should keep your student at the computer or sitting at the table reading and filling out worksheets for 5 1/2 hours per day. Students in public school don't do that, and it would not be "good for them" if they did. Students spend their school time in a variety of ways, unrelated to reading and filling out worksheets.

    Homeschoolers count the following types of things in their school hours. This is not "fudging". They are legitimate activities that can be openly listed in your required records. Once you see the examples, if you stay alert, you can come up with many, many more. These are not very different from what good, creative public school teachers try to do in their classrooms. They are just easier to do at home, and we are not accustomed to thinking of them as "school", but good teachers are always looking for ways to provide their students with practical application of their lessons.

    Music . . . music lessons, practice on a musical instrument, singing in the church choir

    P.E. . . . Little League and other sports, walking, jogging, bicycling, active play at the park

    Home Ec . . . making dinner for the family, actively helping and receiving instruction in grocery shopping, receiving instruction and practicing with sorting laundry

    Science . . . baking bread (accompany this with your explanation of yeast activity or have him research that subject on the Internet), working with a department store chemistry kit, viewing a video on a science topic, going to the zoo

    Social Studies . . . watching television news with the family and taking part in discussion, reading a newspaper, choosing an historical biography to simply read and enjoy

    Math . . . cooking, shopping, building a birdhouse (measuring)

    I'm sure you get the idea. No one expects you to keep a timer on hand while your student is baking a cake, so you can record exactly how much time to chalk up to "math" and how much is "home ec"! Your estimate is fine.

    Good luck to you, as you make these choices for your son.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  5. #5
    dgdg5150 is offline Junior Member Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    3

    Default Thanks a million!

    I really appreciate all of the info. Its a huge help. It almost seems to good to be true that I stumbled across this website. Its nice to know and very comforting knowing there are other parents out there like me and going through the same thing. And I can converse with them on here, which is even better. Now I just have to learn how to use it and convince my son its going to work. We have had a really bad experience with the public school system and he has a very bad attitude towards school now because of it. I am going to do the traditional school year so I can hopefully keep him on track. Needless to say, we will be signing up next month before school starts. Thanks again, Debbie.

  6. #6
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    OR
    Posts
    6,892
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    I'll look forward to seeing you're signed up! Meanwhile, you might want to read Time4Learning's Welcome to Homeschooling Guide for new homeschoolers. You'll see you have plenty of company as an "accidental homeschooler".

    Do give yourself a couple of weeks to a month to get accustomed to the program. We're always here if you have questions!

    I usually try to avoid saying things that might sound like "parenting advice", but I have learned something important about attitudes that I'd like to share. Our kids take their cues from us. Trust me . . . you WILL question your homeschooling decision sometimes. Just don't let him know it! He should see that you are absolutely certain this is the best thing for him. He may grumble occasionally (what kid DOESN'T complain about school?), but he'll accept homeschooling as readily as public school if he knows the decision has been made.

    Again, good luck!

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  7. #7
    witchly's Avatar
    witchly is offline Senior Member Guru
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    422

    Default

    I'm homeschooling in Missouri. As far as keeping track - we have a log I made that I print out which just has a space for the subject and then hours. The hour is 2 columns - core and non core. I put in how many UNIT HOURS (not time hours) we do for whatever subject on each line for each day. There is debate always with MO homeschoolers about the hour thing and if they mean 60 minute hours or unit hours, either way it's very easy to get to the 1,000 required hours.

    Examples of my entries:
    Math - T4L - Graphic 1 unit hour core
    Reading - The Outsiders - 1 unit core
    PE - Bike Riding - 1 unit non-core

    You get the idea.

    I print out a report at the end of each month here from T4L also to keep in his portfolio. I also keep a few various other worksheets/papers/assignments each month along with art projects (or pictures/scans of them), experiment notes/pictures, any computer made projects (PowerPoints, digital videos, etc.) that he does. I do not put a ton of thought into this at all - just pick a few things along the way.

    You will probably never need to show these to anyone. You do not have to check in with anyone in Missouri or register with the state or take tests or have anything approved. You just have to keep those records though, and if ever challenged you may need to show them, but that is not the norm at all. If you are planning on returning to "regular" school at any point the portfolio can be helpful to show them for grade placement if need be also, but it's not required.

    Missouri is a pretty easy state to homeschool in. Hope that helps
    Robyn
    Secular homeschooler of 1 son (14)
    http://feeds.feedburner.com/RobynsOnlineWorld.1.gif

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •