Retention and Review
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Thread: Retention and Review

  1. #1
    Batgirl is offline Junior Member
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    Default Retention and Review

    Hello all,

    When I was first starting out with homeschooling five or six years ago, I used T4L for first grade for my oldest son, who is on the autism spectrum. After awhile I realized that he was listening to the lessons, answering the questions correctly, and promptly forgetting everything he had learned. It took me awhile to figure out this was happening because there were no built in review lessons, plus my son was extremely resistant to repeating a lesson he'd already seen. (This became a HUGE issue with math.) I had to quit. Eventually I found curricula that had enough incremental learning and built in review to suit our needs.

    Fast forward to now: My son is now entering 7th grade. He's a lot more mature than he was 6 years ago, but still struggles with recognizing when he doesn't understand something. He would love something like this and I would love to allow him a little more independence in his learning. He would likely be more willing (grudgingly) to repeat lessons if we both realized he needed the practice.

    My question is: how have other people addressed this problem with their spectrum kids with T4L? Both the need for review and monitoring for retention?

  2. #2
    topsytechie's Avatar
    topsytechie is offline Administrator
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    For our son on the spectrum, retention was really connected to lessons being in a visual format. He's an extremely visual learner, so as long as he was really paying attention to the lessons, they would usually stick. We used T4L all the way through middle school and most of high school and it suited him better than any other program we tried. I think the biggest check is the quizzes and tests. With our son we had an agreement that if he made lower than 70% on a quiz or test, he would rewatch the material. If he was still struggling at that point, we would usually supplement and find other creative ways to study the material. Videos from YouTube, other online sites, books, hands-on etc. Then we'd go back and watch the lesson together, talk it through, and try again. This was the best way for us as a homeschooling family to make sure that he was "getting it."
    bailbrae and Batgirl like this.

  3. #3
    Batgirl is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks, Topsy! I think an agreement like the one you described would be essential. Is there a way to retake quizzes and tests separately from the lessons? Are there any cumulative tests?

  4. #4
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    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Batgirl, it helps to understand how the curriculum is laid out so you can locate the quizzes and tests and have your student take them as many times as you like. (Most of the tests will be somewhat different each time they are attempted, because a few questions are drawn from a large bank of potential questions each time. This assures that the student actually understands the material and doesn't simply memorize test answers.)

    When your student clicks on a subject icon (such as "math"), that is like "opening a textbook". He is taken to a page of icons that represent chapters in the textbook. When he clicks on one of those, he is taken to a page of icons that represent lessons in that chapter. When he clicks on one of those, he is taken to a page of icons that represent lesson activities in that lesson. When he clicks on one of those, he is finally taken to an activity to do.

    The chapter tests are located at the bottom or end of a page of chapter icons. The lesson quizzes are located at the bottom or end of a page of lesson icons. In the newer math lessons, you will find quizzes distributed throughout the curriculum, but the icons are marked "quiz", so they aren't hard to find.

    The chapter tests are intended to be cumulative tests, as they cover what has been studied in all the lessons from that chapter.
    bailbrae and Batgirl like this.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

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