Should I start my son now?
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  1. #1
    hcacka is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Should I start my son now?

    My kids have been going to a small private school for the past couple of years. My son has had many difficulties in school and that is why I took them out of public.
    He is 12 years old and still in the 5th grade. There seems no way he will pass this year.
    He will not do his work, and now they do not want him back.
    With it being this late in the school year, should I pull him out now or is it too late in the school year?
    I was hoping to homeschool all this summer in hopes of getting him to a 6th grade level. Nothing has worked with him. Not public, private or even thearapy. I am hoping your system will be a sucess for him.
    Thoughts?

  2. #2
    IrishMamato2Irishkiddos is offline Junior Member
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    I know where I live you can pull your child out in the middle of the year and homeschool; I don't know about where you live. If my daughter was struggling I would pull her out (since that is allowed where I live), then again I am homeschooling already so I guess I am kind of bias. If your son is struggling, and you have tried everything else and homeschooling is an option then I would totally go for it. Good luck.

  3. #3
    Yca's Avatar
    Yca
    Yca is offline Senior Member
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    most districts will let you pull your child out at anytime, but it never hurts to double check with your county just in case. some other things you want to consider:

    sometimes when kids struggle in public school, it is simply because they have a different learning style than can be afforded in public school. that is what happened with my son. after awhile, teachers get frustrated with them, and they start to take major hits to their esteem and confidence. it sounds like this possibly could be what happened to your son.

    some food for thought: consider taking a year to homeschool him and build back those things that he has lost. but don't start right away ... take a couple of months to "deprogram" him (as i jokingly call it lol). take lots of field trips, explore, hang out .... and then start back slowly. t4l is an amazing program to go at your own pace. a good word of advice is to start below where you think he is ... that way he can get used to the program, and begin building that confidence back up.

    if you are still really on the fence about homeschooling in general, no worries! i was there too!! if, after a year (or whatever time period you decide), you're ready for him to go back to public school, you'll need him to learn skills to set him up for success. work on time management, stress management, evaluating the importance of certain lessons, test taking, all of that stuff that starts to matter in middle school because it is DEFINITELY going to matter in high school.

    we are here for you and all the questions you might have ... just send us a note!!
    ~ Yca ~
    (otherwise known as Jess )

    Wife to Dave and Mom to Red - 13, The Princess - 11, Fluffyheaded Diva - 6, and Sir Smiley - 3
    Read about our adventures HERE!


  4. #4
    hcacka is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Thanks and one more question (for now)

    My son will be 13 this year and is not going to pass the 5th grade. Most of this is not because he does not know the material, but because he just won't do his daily work.
    The only subject I think he is truely struggling in is math.
    I have read that with T4L you can go back one or up one on the grade he is entered in. Would it be your suggestion to start him with 5th grade agendas, and see how it goes?
    Lastly, do you have to complete all grade courses before you can move him to the next level?
    Ok two questions.
    I plan on using T4L this summer as a trial before making a final decision about the upcoming school year.
    Thanks for your reply and help.

  5. #5
    Yca's Avatar
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    Yca is offline Senior Member
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    nownow ... you're starting to hit your max # of questions (totally kidding, my friend)

    what seems to work for most people in determining where a child is in a subject is to have them go and take the chapter tests at the end of each section. you can start him on level 5, since that is where he "should" be. if he passes a unit with flying colors, you know that he knows that material. if he fails it miserably, you know that he doesn't understand it. if he misses a couple of questions, you know that you might want to start a little bit before that just as review.

    children learn different subjects at different speeds. for me, i could read on a high school comprehension when i was in 4th grade ... but i STILL can't balance a check book to save my life. (don't ask!! lol) one of the things i love most about this program is that you don't have to keep all subjects at the same level - he could be in level 6 language arts, but only level 3 in math.

    a couple of things to keep in mind with this program:

    - YOU are in charge of your child's education. t4l does NOT make any decisions for you, nor will they chase you with a club if you don't do things THEIR way (altho, i've heard rumors .... lol) they simply provide a curriculum for you ... it is your decision what to do with it and how to best utilize it for your child's needs

    - this program's main concern is your child's success! no one here is going to throw any curve balls or try and trip you or your child up. the reason why so many people experience success with this program is because children who are supported are successful!!

    one of my closest and dearest friends watched me transition my "problem child" out of public school and into homeschooling and wanted to do the same with hers. her husband totally freaked. as a test, she worked with him during the summer and they watched her child blossom and bust out of all of his hesitations. be forwarned about homeschooling thru the summer ... you could experience such success that you never want to go back to public school again!!

    keep asking questions - we're always here to answer them
    ~ Yca ~
    (otherwise known as Jess )

    Wife to Dave and Mom to Red - 13, The Princess - 11, Fluffyheaded Diva - 6, and Sir Smiley - 3
    Read about our adventures HERE!


  6. #6
    Momma Crystal is offline Senior Member
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    These are my words of advice handed to me from MANY homeschooling moms in my area.

    1st... like YCA said, take some time OFF! Like LOTS of time off. Like MONTHS! School and learning are a battle for this child. Let him relax and veg out. After a few weeks maybe work in some day trips and trips to the library for whatever reading material might actually interest him. If I pulled my kid at this point in the year we wouldn't do any "school" until perhaps the fall. Some people call this deschooling. I like deprogramming!

    2nd... Don't homeschool through the summer to see if it will work. First off, summer is too soon. Secondly, this child has associated summer with fun and freedom and NO school for so long there is a good chance he'll buck it and it won't work. Homeschool NEXT summer if you feel the need. Right now, rest and relax!

    Now, T4L is different than most things out there. I WOULD keep the membership and make it an option now and then with the expectation set that eventually he'll need to work on it every day.

    Hope that helps!

  7. #7
    mcmary is offline Member
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    Hi, My daughter is also twelve and has some special learning needs. She started public, then went to a private school but now (after we moved) does homeschooling plus a few classes at our local school. What really helped for us, when it became apparent that our daughter was falling behind academically, was having her evaluated. She had several neuropsychological evaluations that explained what was going on and why. It was really helpful to help plan her academic course. She started educational therapy to address her specific congnitive and processing weaknesses, which helped a lot! So, before I ramble on too long, my suggestion would be- if you haven't already done so- to find out what his underlying needs are that are causing him to fall behind. The beauty of homeschooling is that you are in charge and you can create the best learning environment for him! One-on-one learning is ideal for kids with special learning needs. We haven't signed up for T4L yet but I'm really excited about it because it is auditory, visual and interactive. I think it will be a great alternative to a traditional textbook (textbooks are NOT a good source of information for my auditory learner). This is my daughter's first year of homeschooling and she loves it- she does not miss the stress of her traditional private school at all!

  8. #8
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    MamaToHerRoo is offline Senior Member
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    Hi, I'm late in chiming in here but agree with what the other moms have posted. My daughter ( 9y/o and now in 5th grade T4L) struggled in school. One of her biggest problems was that she thought the school "thinks I'm the stupidest person on the planet" because they made her repeat things, sit quietly while other students finished their work, and do busy work, meaning do work for NO credit. She saw this as totally pointless. If they didn't think it was important enough for credit, she didn't think it was important enough to do. Very quickly, her self esteem plummeted, she refused to do work if it was not for credit, and they labelled her combative. I spent more hours in the school office each week than it would have taken me to homeschool her. She was not a good fit for the classroom setting because she refused to conform. It was like WW3 every day at our house. T4L changed all of that and set my "butterfly" free. Much of T4L is "for credit" meaning she gets a score, she can see her progress. If it is too easy, I give her the option of passing the quiz with a 90% to opt out of doing the lessons. IF she doesn't pass the quiz, then it is back to the lessons, and she she has to pass with an 80%. Maybe your son just needs a different setting. One of the other moms said to take time off. This is true, sometimes kids get so programmed into the way "school works" and in bucking the system, that they simply don't know how to learn without the battle. I've heard that generalization of take one month off for every year they were in institutionalized school.
    Do you plan to put your son back in school in the fall? Or are you hoping to make homeschooling a way of life? Either way, I hope T4L works for you.
    I am not the state rep for MS, but if you go to the state groups, you will find the one for MS, and ask specific questions about how homeschooling works in your state.
    Linda
    Homeschooling one for 8 years and counting!

  9. #9
    Yca's Avatar
    Yca
    Yca is offline Senior Member
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    i met with my local homeschool mommies last night and one of the biggest things we talked about is how useless each year can be in public schools simply because you spend the first part of the year reviewing, and only then can you learn new things. time management is not a strong suit of the public school system.
    ~ Yca ~
    (otherwise known as Jess )

    Wife to Dave and Mom to Red - 13, The Princess - 11, Fluffyheaded Diva - 6, and Sir Smiley - 3
    Read about our adventures HERE!


  10. #10
    gardenarian is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Hi - I also took my daughter out of school to homeschool. It was a big relief to her! A lot of people recommend taking time off to "deschool." That means not doing any academics at all for a while. This worked for us! I didn't know about T4L at the time, and I do have to say she has been more enthusiastic about this curriculum than any other. Maybe you could try it out for a trial and if your son rebels, try it again in a few months.
    I'm sorry he's going through this difficult time! I hope homeschooling works for all of you. We love it!

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