Wanting to homeschool my kids.
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  1. #1
    lovn5 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Wanting to homeschool my kids.

    I've got three kids and want to pull them out of public school. They have good grades but are not being pushed enough and their teachers are having to move so quickly with what's being done in class, that if a student doesn't understand something there is "no" time to stop. Then sends them out with homework they don't fully understand. Schools are not like they used to be. One is middle school and other two are elementary. I've let all three use the demo and they like it. I've signed up the oldest so he can get a feel for it. But don't really know exactly what all i would need with T4L to make everything legit with school board or state. Any thoughts, feedback, or anything at all would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

  2. #2
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Hi. Each state has its own homeschool laws. Some have no requirements at all. Some simply want you to notify them that you are homeschooling. Others want your children tested each year, or need you to keep "attendance records". So, the first step is to know the laws of your state.

    The best place to find those laws is through a thorough online search. Read information from several online sources and try to find the exact statute, so you know you understand completely.

    Probably the worst place to ask is the school district. When you ask about "homeschooling", schools will often point you in the direction of their own online public school options. Although that takes place at home, it is not "homeschooling". In homeschooling, the parent is the teacher of record and makes all decisions regarding the student's education. Time4Learning is a homeschool curriculum, not an online school, so you are free to use it however you decide best suits your student. For example, your student may work at different grade levels for each subject. You may skip lessons, repeat lessons, make the tests open-book, do lessons out of order, etc.

    We do encourage you to follow your state's homeschool laws, but the vast majority of states are not concerned with the details of how you are educating. Most of the laws are designed to make sure the student is being educated . . . not to dictate how the education takes place.

    You will find more help in our free Welcome to Homeschooling Guide.

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  3. #3
    myakita3 is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    I just registered with this site however have not purchased anything yet. I am getting ready to homeschool my little ones next school year. I have a 7 year old and a soon to be 6 year old. They are both very bright and we believe they are capable of being challenged and pushed a bit more academically. I am not sure if this program is good for us as I would also like to incorporate an open book system as well. I just have no clue as to where I should begin. My husband and I have built a classroom and we hired a private teacher who is licensed to teach elementary education. Is Time4Learning mainly and online curriculum? Does anyone have any suggestions as to where we can find books to add into the daily routine?

  4. #4
    hearthstone_academy's Avatar
    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Hi! Time4Learning is an online curriculum. There are printable worksheets for many of the lessons.

    If you hired a private, licensed teacher, he or she may have their own ideas about what curriculum to use and how to use it. By the legal definition, a parent is the teacher of record when homeschooling, although you are free to delegate tasks to anyone you wish, including a licensed teacher. I want to make sure you know this is not necessary to follow the law.

    There are many, many homeschool book pubishers. Just Google "homeschool curriculum" and you will find more options than you could possibly ever explore. Some of the more common complete programs are A Beka, Bob Jones University, ACE, and Alpha Omega (Christian curriculums). If you are looking for secular curriculum ideas, you might start by asking at http://www.secularhomeschool.com . (Time4Learning is secular.)

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

  5. #5
    nelschooling is offline Junior Member
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    I'm at the same place at the moment and can share what I have figured out this week...

    In my state T4L is an acceptable curriculum choice. However, I have an hours requirement that I need to fill and this will not even come close. After I set up the activity schedule for a year, my 8-year old did a weeks worth of third grade work in 5 hours. My 10-year old is taking a little longer, but will probably finish the week in about 8-hours. I need approx 20-30 hours a week to meet our quarterly requirement. Of course there are other subjects I need to add in weekly, such as PE, art, music, library, and health, but they will not fill such a huge gap.

    Now, even if I did not have an hours requirement to meet and report, I would still want my child doing more than 5-8 hours of academics a week. So, if I do decided to use T4L as my primary curriculum this year, I will add in book reports, research projects, and science experiments to provide not only more bulk to his learning, but also a good amount of time away from the computer. Plus I will be adding in additional math lessons that we will do together so that I personally know for sure that he has a firm understanding of the concepts and is not just clicking through the work and getting lucky on the quizzes and tests.

    All that said, the first step is figuring out what your state requires, then determining how much above and beyond T4L you need to do to meet that.

    Now, aside from the requirement, I need my children to be working independently for about 10 hours a week, so I myself am still on the fence as to whether this really will work for us or not. But for now, my boys are really liking it and want to do it everyday, which is certainly a good thing.
    Last edited by nelschooling; 07-02-2015 at 06:22 PM.

  6. #6
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    hearthstone_academy is offline Administrator
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    Hi, nel and myakita! Here is an article you might be interested in: How Long is a Homeschool Day? I would strongly encourage you to read it. A student should not be expected to sit at a computer for six hours a day and for only that work to "count" as "school work". Those who make the rules are of the public school mindset, and new homeschoolers commonly have difficulty acquiring a homeschool mindset, too.

    There are only a few states with "hours" requirements. In those states, homeschoolers can legitimately count Scouts, music lessons, organized sports, 4H, church activities, educational DVDs and computer games, and casual instruction in things such as cooking, sewing, auto repair, etc. as school hours. Just jot notes of hours spent on those activities on a calendar.

    Again, please read the article and don't expect your child to sit with books at a desk or in front of the computer for six hours. Kids at school DON'T do that. Much of their class period is spent on things besides filling in worksheets.

    Best of luck to you!

    Mom of six . . . current students and homeschool graduates. Enjoying using Time4Learning since 2006!

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