For Wisconsin homeschoolers of special needs kids
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  1. #1
    Rags is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Nov 2010
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    Red face For Wisconsin homeschoolers of special needs kids

    I do not want in anyway for someone to think I am putting down T4L, because I am not, but I want to let parents of LLD kids know of another option. Please remember when reading that it is to late to do this for next school year, but something to keep in the back of your mind for next year....
    Wisconsin allows for any student to be open enrolled in ANY Wisconsin school, reguardless of home district, as long as accepted by the purposed school and the home district agrees. This also includes enrolling in public online academies. Here I should let you know that I would never put my son back into public school if I did not have control.
    Sparta Area School District is using Calvert online academy (one of the best homeschool programs available if you can afford it) as their online school, which means that parents of special needs kids can use Verticy. Verticy is a program for children with language based disabilities. All of the text books and reading materials are able to be read to the students with a program that the school district purchases for you. Grammar/composition and phonic/spelling are not based on grade levels, but on color level based on ability. Math is tested seperatly, then the core subjects. The base of this program is that children are tested and placed based on what they know, their abilities, and their ability to learn when listening instead of reading. As an example- Our son will be a 7th grade public school student who will be using the 2nd level of spell/phonics and grammar/composition, 4th gade math, and 5th gade core ( science, social studies, geography, technology and art). Sparta school district will allow a 12 month school year for Verticy students, instead of a 9 month school year. We intend to use T4L as an add-on to the Verticy program because, as any special needs parent knows, sometimes you need different ways to teach the same thing or extra materials. The open enrollment window begins in Feb or March of each year, and you just fill out a simple online form.
    Like I said, I have almost complete control with Sparta school district. I say how often, and when he goes to school. The ONLY requirement is that he do a 3 question knowledge quiz when he does do his online lessons, and that he complete 160 tests by the end of the year. That boils down to a test every 20 lessons. He is allowed to dictate any "writing" portions to me to type or write out. He is also allowed to type and print any answers to any of the tests, if he chooses. The students also call in and read to a special ed instructor with those tests. The instructor then mails back feedback to the parent and student, along with stickers and such for the student.
    Anyway, I just wanted to let others know about this program as an option for their special ed children. It is very hard to find a program that actually caters to special ed kids, and often times someone else sharing is the only way we know. We will post follow-ups to this as the next school year goes on to let you all know how it is working out.

  2. #2
    MrsPreston is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Hi,

    I just wanted to add some additional information to this, though I know it's an old post.

    Wisconsin state law allows the home district to REFUSE to allow students with IEPs to leave their home districts. Apparently this is because they must pay the accepting school district additional money for services, and the law allows them to deny the request to transfer because of cost.

    When we decided to homeschool, we applied to online programs in neighboring districts, as ours does not offer that option. We were denied at both of them, because our home district said her services would be too expensive. This, despite the fact that nearly all of the services she requires are directly related to her actual presence in school (she's physically disabled, so things like extra help in phys ed). We were so angry we didn't appeal, but apparently this is not a new situation. The rate of kids with special needs enrolling in online public schools here is very low, lower than the general population and much lower than you would expect, given that it's a very common reason to want to pull your kids out of school.

    As I understand it, some people are considering a lawsuit against the state, because the way the law works ends up being discriminatory. Obviously, not all students will be refused, but I wanted to make people aware that they could be, and why.

  3. #3
    mamaneedham is offline Senior Member
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    May 2009
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    1,320

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    Hello Mrs Preston,

    Thank you for sharing this with us all. I wasn't aware of this situation, so thanks for spending the time to "educate" us on this!
    Mom to five of the world's most incredible kids, and homeschooling all the way!

    "If the schools were perfect, I would still homeschool my children - because it isn't about school. It's about families taking back their children and educating them as they see best. School is only a substitute for the real thing."

    Nutrition Curriculum For Homeschoolers at NutritionForHealthyKids.com



  4. #4
    Julie Roy Levenhagen is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Jan 2013
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    I know this is an old thread, but wanted to add my 2 cents. We recently pulled our son out of public school (we're in the Appleton school district) and decided to enroll him in Wisconsin Connections Academy, the e-school in our district. In doing so, we had to actually decline special education services, effectively ending his IEP. All of his special services were in place to accommodate his ADHD, but because the IEP is a legal document, Wisconsin Connections would have had the right to deny his admission due to their inability to provide those accommodations (at least that's how it was explained to me). I wasn't aware of this potential issue, and figure others in similar situations might benefit from this info!

  5. #5
    PJ54669 Guest

    Default Re: For Wisconsin homeschoolers of special needs kids

    Quote Originally Posted by Julie Roy Levenhagen View Post
    I know this is an old thread, but wanted to add my 2 cents. We recently pulled our son out of public school (we're in the Appleton school district) and decided to enroll him in Wisconsin Connections Academy, the e-school in our district. In doing so, we had to actually decline special education services, effectively ending his IEP. All of his special services were in place to accommodate his ADHD, but because the IEP is a legal document, Wisconsin Connections would have had the right to deny his admission due to their inability to provide those accommodations (at least that's how it was explained to me). I wasn't aware of this potential issue, and figure others in similar situations might benefit from this info!
    My daughter pulled her dyslexic son out of H.S. last year about half way through the year. She had the same issue with online schools because of his IEP. Now this year she enrolled him back into her residential district school and they are trying to deny him enrollment. He had some issues in school last year,nothing major just typical teen rebellion, but has outgrown them this year. He has a job, his own car and drivers license and has matured greatly. So now she has to fight the school on not allowing him access to public school. They say it's because of his lack of credits, but have not asked for any proof of her schooling him at home or even asked for a meeting with her about this. This is a school that if you don't have the name or play sports your child doesn't really matter. A small school as well in a small town :/ I would think that because he has special needs they can not refuse to allow him in his residential school to complete his education. No they rather told her he would be sent to the Technical College to get his GED or HGED anyway and that she might as well do that.I do have the schools response for verification if needed. They are forcing him to get a GED over his H.S. diploma on her. Any help on this would be greatly appreciated. My email is [email protected], please put DYSLEXIA in the subject so I do not delete on mistake. Thank you

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