Full-time WOHs - Why did you add this OTHER full-time job?
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  1. #1
    robotti is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Full-time WOHs - Why did you add this OTHER full-time job?

    I was just wondering, were all of you WOH when you started homeschooling? I was, and I really hesitated to start homeschooling for that reason.

  2. #2
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    timmysmom is offline Member
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    Default Re: Full-time WOHs - Why did you add this OTHER full-time job?

    Because I'm a sucker for punishment!!

    No, really, the amount of time that we spent at the school trying to help the little guy through the day (all we asked for was a one-on-one--the school district fired all the para-professionals due to "budget cuts") we might as well as home schooled him. So we are.

    When the principle finally said, "I think home schooling is the best thing you can do for him", (much longer story than that. A whole semester of fighting for what ds needed ended with that sentence) we said "OK!" It has been a lot of trial and error figuring out how he learns best, but he is learning!! T4L will help me keep up with how he is doing while I'm gone. MY dh is home with the boys while I work, but is "hands off" with helping ds with the day-to-day learning and assignments.
    Sandra
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    Worksheets created by my cousin for preschoolers!!

  3. #3
    deluxi is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Re: Full-time WOHs - Why did you add this OTHER full-time job?

    I work at home and I'm considering homeschooling my 5 year old. But since I work at home, I'm afraid I won't have enough time for work AND for homeschooling. The best route for me might be to hire someone to teach my child at home, but that'll cost me a lot and finances are a little tight right now.

  4. #4
    abandemehr is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    Default Re: Full-time WOHs - Why did you add this OTHER full-time job?

    I'm a classic "accidental homeschooler" -- my son was asked to leave his private special needs school, due to their inability to meet his needs. Actually, I would call myself a "long-time wannabe homeschooler" as I have always liked the idea of doing this for my children and now am doing it because we have no other choice. I work full-time with the option of going to part-time, which I may do. My job is demanding. And I'm seeing homeschooling as being demanding too. We'll see. We just signed up for T4L today! Looking forward to posts on this forum!
    Angela in Falls Church VA

  5. #5
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    misschrys is offline Junior Member
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    I was homeschooled off and on throughout my own education. Course I had a om who was not only indecisive, but also not really worried about whether or not I learned. As a result, i feel severely behind in school. Each time I re-rentered school, it was harder and harder to keep up. I ended up getting my GED on my own two weeks before my oldest was born. (I prmoised myself to do either that or learn to drive. The doctor vetoed driving. LOL). Due to my not so great experiences, I planned to NEVER home-school my children. Education is EXTREMELY important to my husband and I, mainly I think becuase we failed to get a proper one and we still feel the repurcussions of that today.
    So, we sent our children off to school and thought that was it. After several years, medications galore, tears, counseling, etc, I was still convinced I would not home-school. Then, one day I was having another tear ful conversation with my oldest, when I looked at him and realized "This is not the happy go lucky kid I sent to kindergarten. This kid is miserable and it's not getting better. I want my little boy back." So, i had to ask myself if I was going to allow my own fear to stand in the way of doing what was right for him. And then, my boss suggested it, and my husband got a huge per diem bonus that was enough to get my son a decent curriculum and everythin else fell into place. So, how could I say no?
    After a year of struggling, we have made real honest to godf progress. He has skipped a grade, he is off alsmot all his meds, and he actually HAS a personality. It's been really great for him.
    Of course, my youngest son was still in school, fighting his own fight. After rounds of psyche evals, he was finally diagnosed with Asperger's. Instead of being a shock, it was more of a validation for what we already knew as parents. So, we were allowed to treat him as he needed to be trteated rather than treat him a just a badly behaving child. Despite his teachers' efforts, the school board bound thier hands and refused to give him the educational accompdations he needed. So, we pulled him out , too. Of course, that has added a whole new dynamic to be dealt with where my oldest is concerned, b ut we are dealing with that. My youngest MAY end up going to a special school nearby. The tuition is high, so we have applied for SSIDisability for him. We are waiting to see both how that goes and also how well he adjust to home-schooling.

    So, that's pretty much my story. LOL. At this point, i think it's less adding homeschooling to my work life and more like "continuing to work, even though i am home-schooling", if that makes any sense whatsoever.
    They say that we are better educated than our parents' generation. What they mean is that we go to school longer. They are not the same thing.
    ~Douglas Yates

  6. #6
    smbrate is offline Junior Member
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    Actually, I don't 'work at home', but work outside the home. we did 'unschooling' until this year. I have a 9 and 7yo, and the 3yo just kept to herself. I work nights, and pretty much sleep most of the day. That worked out great for us. My 9yo learned a lot of history just watching tv, like Drive Thru History, Liberty Kids, ..there are a lot of educational shows on tv you can throw at them I still am not sure how my 7yo learned to read, but this year when I started her on grade 1 she had to 'skip' a grade, because it was just too easy. math can be easily learn doing computer games. i know my 9yo learned to read (she had the phonics down, but refused to do it) when she started getting into video games and had to read the instructions. Mom wasn't available to help, so it was learn or stop. She learned! They also have penpals, so that helps with their writing skills. I corrected the ones I saw, adding grammar tips now and then.

    Anyways, that's our life! I work outside the home, though. They're doing fine! When you take that route...there really isn't much stress at all. (only to play quietly so mom can sleep

  7. #7
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    JoyMariah is offline Junior Member Newbie
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    "WOH" Work OUTSIDE of the home right? Yep, thats me. I do work a 40 hour week outside of the home. And your right about homeschooling being a second full time job, thats exactly what it is. For me, the reason is because my only child had struggled in school for three years with an anxiety disorder that no one could ever really seem to accomodate. We tried the IEP route, went through many teachers who tried to accomodate but the nature of his illness made it so that every week there were new problems to deal with and the old ones would be out the window. In the end i was spending every day all day in the classroom to assist with his needs. Somewhere along the line it hit me that homeschooling was the solution i was looking for....basically doing what i was already doing in his classroom only cutting the time it took in half since we didnt need to allow for all the other time suckers the classroom has to provide. Last year was our first successful year homeschooling. My sons report card at the end of his last semester in public school was a d in english/reading/writing a c in Math, social studies and science and a b in art and music. At the end of our first year with T4L and a few other curriculums added in he walked away with straight a's, for the first time in his life. I only wish I had made the decision sooner.

  8. #8
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    I work a 40 hour week outside the home as well. It is like I have two jobs, and a serious lack of life. Heh. My son is high-functioning autistic and while we had an IEP and such, it wasn't working for him. I think the nail in our public education coffin was when I surprise visited the classroom and found my son left in the middle of the room staring at a blank wall with absolutely no interaction or bringing him back to reality. I watched this go on for over 15 minutes and I was left in shock. I'm hoping T4L is going to help us better manage our time. Nana watches him during the day for me, but she is not confident to lead his materials. However, I have already seen vast improvements in his capability, desire to learn more, and his speech is even getting better with our intense phonics regimen (our state doesn't teach phonics anymore...). I wish I had never sent my son to public now that I know what was going on... he was being forced into rout memorization for their tests and being left with no complex thinking or reasons why a pair means a pair or what a sentence structure was like. I cried not too long ago when he presented me a 10 sentence paper. It was the first time he didn't fight about writing. I ask myself, what were they doing with him? I'm sure everyone meant well, but I just don't think they had the time to give him everything he needed, so I'm glad we're doing this now.

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